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Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth?

Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth? | general geography | Scoop.it

"Muslims call it the Noble Sanctuary. Jews and Christians call it the Temple Mount." 

 

What happens when various religious groups claim the same territory as their own?


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Mrs. B's curator insight, February 10, 9:08 AM

#Jerusalem

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 14, 11:35 AM

This article and picture points out just how hard it is to “solve” the problems in Israel.  The constant overlapping of buildings on holy sites complicates the issues more than anything political ever could.  Belief is one of the biggest driving forces for conflict in the world and this illustration reminds us of that.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 1:54 PM

In some of the oldest civilizations on earth, religion is the most important aspect of life. There will always be extreme conflicts in these ancient areas all over religion.

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | general geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:16 PM

unit 2

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Crisis Guide: Iran

Crisis Guide: Iran | general geography | Scoop.it

"Iran poses steep challenges to its Middle East neighbors and the world. Explore the country's complex regime structure and controversial nuclear program, and watch experts debate the range of policy options."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 7:08 PM

Iran is in the middle of one of the most important geopolitical regions. One the bordered with Iraq and the Persian Gulf, Iran is stratgeically positioned to have considerable control over the world’s most important waterway for oil shipping and trade, the Strait of Hormuz.


Given it's context, Iran is a country that students should more about than the three main facts that that most Americans are already aware of (1-Iran has an Islamic-based government, 2-an emerging nuclear program and 3-a ton of oil).  This interactive feature is a good starting point with great videos, timelines, maps, articles that assess the current situation in Iran. 


Tags: Iran, political, Middle East.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 22, 2013 12:35 AM

This is an amzing resource to use and find out much about this country, both its past and present.  With this you can understand their feeling of hatred toward the US with its support of the Shah.  This is a relationship that the US needs to repair, but both sides need to work on this.  This are is so important to the US and the world given Iran's geographic location right on the Persian Gulf, whcih they can cut off and controll the oil flowing from that area, plus the oil they control, plus bordering several crucial US and NATO allies.  It only seems in everyone's best interest to sit down and talk.  Given the support Iran gives to many terrorists organization and it's longstanding position that Israel does not have the right the right to exist, this idea of sitting down and talking may be a fantasy.  However, with the new elections and the new President of Iran speaking at the UN there may be renewed hope of at least a start. 

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Syria for Educators

Syria for Educators | general geography | Scoop.it
-Introduction (1 minute) -Sign up for a free Prezi account and give your students background with the Syria the Basics   PREZI . (5 minutes)  - Follow up with another   PREZI   about Youth...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 6, 2013 7:49 AM

Have you wanted to teach about current events in Syria but weren't sure where to start?  This resource suggested by the Arizona Geographic Alliance has lesson plans, materials and resources for all grades.  


Tags: Syria, conflict, K12, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Welcome To The New Middle East

Welcome To The New Middle East | general geography | Scoop.it
The violent protests at U.S. embassies this week seemed to catch the new Middle East governments flat-footed. So are these attacks an aberration on the rocky road of nation building, or a harbinger of a region moving toward greater chaos?

 

This nicely puts the political instability of North Africa in context to understand the recent attack on U.S. embassies.

 

Tags: MiddleEast, political, states.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 18, 2012 6:33 PM
Although change is continuous we must remember that it does not occur instantaneously. The Arab Spring and the removal of many autocratic governments has created in many of these countries a power gap that the new governments are trying to fill among other local competing factions. Before we judge the New Middle East we must take into account that these actions were done by individuals in the response to a video uploaded by an individual. Should the worth of a nation be measured by the acts of a few people? Likewise the anti-Islamic video that went viral stuck at the heart of Middle Eastern beliefs and it should not be surprising that it was not well received by Muslims. Remember the public outcry in the US over the “victory” Mosque in New York? Multiply that feeling by a factor of 10 and we might understand how many Muslims felt about this video.
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On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | general geography | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political. 


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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 11:32 AM

A relatively grim reminder that even things as clear-cut as road systems can be inherently political. This system forces segregation by the law of which roads can be driven on, but it's a good jumping point to remember that even the placement of roads can exclude or include communities. I'm reminded of the proposed idea for a NAFTA superhighway running through Mexico, Canada, and the US. One of the criticisms was that the highway would not provide exits for anywhere but major economics centers, effectively cutting off small towns from the rest of the area.

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Interactives: War and Refugees

Interactives: War and Refugees | general geography | Scoop.it

UNHCR has been attempting to count the world's refugees since it was created. If you want to find out which years resulted in the worst displacement, which were the biggest countries of origin and which were the biggest countries of asylum, use the interactive map.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 27, 2013 10:02 AM

This interactive on refugees is especially timely, given that the Syrian civil war has created refugee situations in many of the neighboring countries.  One of my favorite elements of the Guardian's interactive is that they provide the raw data, so students can create their own maps with the same high quality data.  Equally important, this interactive shows the regional power bases of all the various factions of the Syrian rebellion that is seeking to overthrow the Assad regime.  The political conflict has huge demographic implications.    

Tags: refugees, Syria, migration, conflict, political, MiddleEast, war.

Emilie Kochert's curator insight, September 8, 2013 4:25 AM

via gduboz

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 12:16 PM

unit 2

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A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next

A parched Syria turned to war, scholar says; Egypt may be next | general geography | Scoop.it
Prof. Arnon Sofer sets out the link between drought, Assad’s civil war, and the wider strains in the Middle East; Jordan and Gaza are also in deep trouble, he warns

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 11:25 AM

The article explains how population growth, climate change, drought, and water shortages could have contributed to the rise of war in Syria. This is an interesting interpretation, one which certainly could have been a contributing factor, but not all the Arab Spring can be attributed to water shortages so it is not a direct cause. The water shortages in Syria and a lack of government response certainly could have fanned flames which already existed due to an oppressive regime and regional conflicts. Climate change gets a lot of attention for the potential damage it could do to the environment, but I had not given much thought to the conflicts it could cause between nations and peoples.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:22 PM

Egypt may be the next country to be in deep trouble. With so many militant attacks coming out of Egypt to being with there is no surprise that the Middle East thinks it will be next on the list.

Pamela Hills's curator insight, July 18, 8:37 AM

 A world at war and hot spots are growing with people caught in middle <3

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Syria for Educators

Syria for Educators | general geography | Scoop.it
-Introduction (1 minute) -Sign up for a free Prezi account and give your students background with the Syria the Basics   PREZI . (5 minutes)  - Follow up with another   PREZI   about Youth...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 6, 2013 7:49 AM

Have you wanted to teach about current events in Syria but weren't sure where to start?  This resource suggested by the Arizona Geographic Alliance has lesson plans, materials and resources for all grades.  


Tags: Syria, conflict, K12, political, MiddleEast, war.

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Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia

Fields of Green Spring up in Saudi Arabia | general geography | Scoop.it
Saudi Arabia is drilling for a resource possibly more precious than oil by tapping hidden reserves of water in the Syrian Desert.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 11:53 AM

These images show the growth of farmland in Saudi Arabia. With little to no rainfall annually, these fields are irrigated by mining for water deep in underground aquifers. This investment into agriculture by Saudi Arabia, an oil rich country which can buy the food it needs, suggests that the nation is concerned with the production of the food it buys or the sustainability of its oil wealth. Problematic, though, would be the long-term agricultural plans as the method being used for acquiring irrigation water is only sustainable for 50 years.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 8:30 PM

Saudi Arabia may have an abundance of oil, however, they do not have an abundance of water and fertile soil. Saudi Arabia could import plenty of food with the profits they receive from oil production. It appears they are attempting to be more self-sufficient and trying to invest in agriculture, with the hopes of growing their own food and other crops. This country will not have oil forever, and it appears they are planning for the future.  

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 12:56 PM

In any society, survival trumps economy.  In this case water and oil are the respective area of focus in Saudi Arabia.  Saudi Arabia has been tapping into aquifers under the Arabian desert in order to grow food.  This is a move of independence;  as the NAFTA agreement may allow the Americas to be energy-independent, Saudi Arabia needs a backup plan to become  a little more independent itself as their oil money decreases.  However, this water source is limited and is ecologically very unsound since the desert climate is not good for water and plants.

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An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World'

An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World' | general geography | Scoop.it
The violent backlash against the American film is taking place in Muslim societies, but it doesn't seem to correlate with Islam's reach.

 

This is a good reminder that the generalizing about "all Muslims" is as inaccurate as generalization about "all Christians" or any other group.  The world and people are much more nuanced than that. 

 

Tags: MiddleEast, Islam, conflict.


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Martin Daumiller's comment, September 16, 2012 2:53 AM
The map is slightly poor. 100% and more world muslim population? There is a great mix-up between muslims living in a country and percentage of muslims living in a country, therefore turning the U.S., Russia, etc. also into the discussion.
Also there is a distinction between not-protesting and not supporting the protests, which should influence the authers comparision of different mentalities.
The main idea against stereotypes and generalization is a very worthy one, but the way is article shows it is flawed.