Gender in the Media
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Facebook Ads and Gender Targeting | Social Media Today

Facebook Ads and Gender Targeting | Social Media Today | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it
Knowing the facts of gender engagement can help social media advertisers better optimize their ad spending.

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
Alireza Rezaei's insight:

in other parts of the world we see the participation of the women in medias to much. but in Afghanistan because of traditional grassroots, still the participation of gender in society, especially in media is less.

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Rescooped by Alireza Rezaei from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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Africa: Gender media and Information Literacy | Chat Literacy Blog

Africa: Gender media and Information Literacy | Chat Literacy Blog | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it

Women are known to be poor users of the media and many other sources of information mainly the written and digital information. They are also wrongly captured as media sources as most of them lack information literacy skills.

 

Media is a source of information and news. It is the key driver of the democratization of social spaces and societies, providing a platform for citizens to freely share information, express their views, learning and to develop themselves and their communities.

 

The Global Media Monitoring Programme Report 2010 on the media consumers indicates that 21 percent of those interviewed and whose views appeared in the media were women. However, in southern Africa, according to Gender Links research 17 percent of women in SADC make media sources.

 

The major reason for the small number considering that in the region women and girls consists of 54 percent is that they are constantly left out owing to their information literacy levels and competencies.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Rescooped by Alireza Rezaei from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Boys, Girls, and Media Messages | Common Sense Media

Boys, Girls, and Media Messages | Common Sense Media | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it
Advice from Common Sense Media editors. Help kids learn to recognize harmful gender stereotypes -- and not perpetuate them.

Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, January 26, 2013 5:27 AM

Thanks to http://www.scoop.it/t/new-learning-ny-laering for this link!

 

Very interesting, a MUST read:

 

===> In this digital age, it's important for kids to develop media-literacy skills early on. Parents, relatives, teachers, and other adult mentors are uniquely positioned to help kids analyze the gender messages they see on TV, at the movies, in ads, in games, and online — and to encourage them not to perpetuate harmful stereotypes. <===


Rescooped by Alireza Rezaei from Afghan Women in Media
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Digital Development Debates - 04 Media - Women's empowerment - Influence of Afghan Media  

Digital Development Debates - 04 Media - Women's empowerment - Influence of Afghan Media   | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it
Digital Development Debates and Biodiversity (Women's Empowerment - Influence of Afghan Media - Digital Development Debates:...)...

Via Kimberly Stinson
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Rescooped by Alireza Rezaei from Afghan Women in Media
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Afghan Women in Media

Stories for & about Afghan women working in media, as well as a collection of articles tracking the representation of Afghan women in media.

Via Kimberly Stinson
Alireza Rezaei's insight:

Afghan women have many difficulties to use media or work in media

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Categorizing women: gender and social media during the 2011 Egyptian Revolution

Categorizing women: gender and social media during the 2011 Egyptian Revolution | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it

From February 2011 to July 2012, formerly suppressed political parties struggled to fill the political void post-Hosni Mubarak. While debates about Egypt’s political future circulated, individuals as well as dissident factions employed various interpretations of women and their roles to symbolically represent their varying ideologies. Despite the significance and economic value women produce as citizens, many political actors regularly bracket their concerns as irrelevant to the affairs of the state. As a result, political actors have engaged with new strategic techniques to access the various politicized publics that marginalized subaltern groups. The most publicized approach during this time, involved individual’s employment of social media, where political actors could not only escape state media’s control over information, but also produce their own level of citizen authority. By ethnographically exploring social networking forums and engaging with Cairene political actors, this research argues that a dialectical relationship exists between social media and politicized publics where actors repurpose, and challenge concepts about women to alter the political atmosphere during the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Using participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and discourse analysis, this research explores how the analytical category of women was contested in social media and to what extent these classifications were manifested in publics found on- and offline. In order to understand the shifting political spheres during the Egyptian revolution, this ethnographic study engages with the symbolic deployment of women as a category, and the relationship between the production of women and publics. Participants of this research were selected amongst a systematic random sampling framework via Twitter; using prevalent hash tags that engaged with discourses about Egyptian women, the 2011 Egyptian revolution, future governance, and cyber activism. Key events served as a methodological frame to constitute case studies. The events were derived from interviews in which, participants defined what they believed to be moments of significance. This research contributes to the literature regarding the effect new communication technologies have on social structures by investigating the implication that genders has online. This is important because the ways women are marked, categorized, and circulated, consequently contribute to shaping future governance and sociopolitical apparatuses.   Source: http://dar.aucegypt.edu/handle/10526/3258

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Facebook Ads and Gender Targeting | Social Media Today

Facebook Ads and Gender Targeting | Social Media Today | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it
Knowing the facts of gender engagement can help social media advertisers better optimize their ad spending.

Via Marylene Delbourg-Delphis
Alireza Rezaei's insight:

in other parts of the world we see the participation of the women in medias to much. but in Afghanistan because of traditional grassroots, still the participation of gender in society, especially in media is less.

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Rescooped by Alireza Rezaei from Consumer Behavior in Digital Environments
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How Men and Women Use Social Media Differently (Infographic)

How Men and Women Use Social Media Differently (Infographic) | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it

When it comes to social media, male and female behavior is very different.

 

For instance, women do the bulk of Facebook sharing (62 percent), while more men are on LinkedIn than women (54 percent). Men also spend more time on YouTube each week than women, as guys clock an hour compared to 35 minutes for women.

 

Twitter appears to be dominated by women (62 percent) and, not surprisingly, Pinterest (70 percent). 

 

Overall, though, a higher percentage of women (71 percent) use social media than men (62 percent). 

 

For more on the differences between the genders" social media use, check out this infographic from Interentserviceproviders.org:




Via Russ Merz, Ph.D.
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Russ Merz, Ph.D.'s curator insight, May 20, 2013 12:38 PM

Interesting contrasts between man and women and the use of social media...what do you think? Agree? Disagree?

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’100 Percent Men’ Tumblr highlights gender gap in media, tech, politics | Poynter.

The new “100 Percent Men” Tumblr highlights “corners of the world where women have yet to tread” and aims to “shine a light” on the issue. New Republic reporter Lydia DePillis created the Tumblr earlier this month to show the gender disparity among higher-ups at news organizations, political groups, tech companies and more.

 

“[I] just wanted a place to collect the 100% men instances I’d noticed in a central place, and Tumblr’s generally acknowledged as the best platform to do that,” she told Poynter. Many of the posts include photos that show how male (and white) the executives of some companies are. Other posts highlight media-related “Boys Clubs”:

- “Everyone to ever serve as editor-in-chief of The New Republic.”

- “Top editors and reporters at Talking Points Memo.”

- “All the bylines in the April 29th issue of The New Yorker. (h/t @annfriedman)”

- Every annual award given by the National Sportscaster and Sportswriters Association, ever, along with the entire board. DePillis said she plans to continue adding media-related posts to the Tumblr....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, May 1, 2013 1:20 PM

Gender bender tracks gender bias.

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How to Use Social Media for Research and Development | Entrepreneur.com

How to Use Social Media for Research and Development | Entrepreneur.com | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it
Consider this advice for getting customer feedback over Facebook and Twitter.

Via Kimberly Stinson
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Turkish PM: social media and opposition to blame for protests

Turkish PM: social media and opposition to blame for protests | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it
'Social media is the worst menace to society,' says Recep Erdogan after thousands take control of Istanbul's main square (RT @guardianworld: "There is now a menace which is called Twitter...
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Infographic: social media use by gender, age and network

Infographic: social media use by gender, age and network | Gender in the Media | Scoop.it
Pew Internet released a study back in February entitled, “The Demographics of Social Media Users” which keyed into the social media use by gender, age and network (and ethnicity).

Via Alan Horton
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