Gender in Children's Literature
231 views | +0 today
Follow
Gender in Children's Literature
Children's Literature is one of the ways that children learn about gender. In order to increase tolerance and acceptance of some of the many differences that people have, it is important that a plethora of books exist that address these issues. Yet how much diversity is really out there?
Curated by Klara Charlton
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

A Manifesto for Children's Literature; or, Reading Harold as a ...

A Manifesto for Children's Literature; or, Reading Harold as a ... | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
It thus a literature for an audience whose tastes, reading ability, socio-economic status, hobbies, health, culture, interests, gender, home life, and race varies widely. Children's literature is literature for an unknowable, ...
Klara Charlton's insight:

This is very good!  I recommend reading this article!  It delineates all of the things I have ever thought about Children's Lit, and I wish more people thought about these things in general.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Gender issues in children's literature - PhysOrg.com

Gender issues in children's literature - PhysOrg.com | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Writers, publishers, teachers and parents need to closely scrutinise gender construction in children's literature so that young children are presented with stories that promote equality and respect for both sexes according to ...
Klara Charlton's insight:

R E S P E C T!

more...
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Gender equality doesn't endanger gender - Gaelick

Gender equality doesn't endanger gender - Gaelick | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Gender equality doesn't endanger gender Gaelick My understanding of the various Swedish policies is not that they wish to trample gender into the history books but rather create a society where gender isn't the the main defining characteristic of...
Klara Charlton's insight:

Sweden seems to have many progressive policies.  this is a wonderful idea, but is it legislatable?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Princess upstaged by humble legume - Canberra Times - The Canberra Times

Princess upstaged by humble legume - Canberra Times - The Canberra Times | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
The Canberra Times
Princess upstaged by humble legume - Canberra Times
The Canberra Times
It is, says director Barb Barnett, an expanded take on the classic tale, playing with gender stereotypes and sending a different message to the young audience.
Klara Charlton's insight:

Hmmmmm.......perhaps a good direction!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Reject "Girl Things" and "Boy Things" -- Sex Organs Don't Dictate Nurturing Or ... - Huffington Post Canada (blog)

Reject "Girl Things" and "Boy Things" -- Sex Organs Don't Dictate Nurturing Or ... - Huffington Post Canada (blog) | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Reject "Girl Things" and "Boy Things" -- Sex Organs Don't Dictate Nurturing Or ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

The Paper Bag Princess | The Official Website of Robert Munsch

The Paper Bag Princess | The Official Website of Robert Munsch | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Hi, welcome to robertmunsch.com. I hope you enjoy this selection of my work, as well as the creative art and short stories donated by kids and teachers.
Klara Charlton's insight:

I like that this changes the gender role without necessarily adding any potential issues of sexuality into the mix.  I would like to see some more neutral role reversal from authors who are coming at this type of story from the opposite gender prespective.  Perhaps a balance between the issueswould be good?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

ChildrenandTeens_Bib.pdf

Klara Charlton's insight:

This is a good find, and includes resources from this millennium.  Thank you San Francisco Library!

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Williams" Doll

Williams" Doll | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Klara Charlton's insight:

I found this book, but it was written in 1972.  That does not invalidate it in any way, but when I searched the web for children's books about boys playing with dolls, this was it.  So far I have not found another.  So it is a groundbreaking book that is now 40 years old, and has had no modern  succesor.  I am surprised at this.

more...
Klara Charlton's comment, April 25, 2013 8:29 PM
Really, that is all I could find. I welcome any title suggestions.
Amy Dean's comment, April 26, 2013 3:46 PM
I bet in 1972 this book was pretty groundbreaking! Here is a blog I found that lists 10 books that "challenge traditional gender roles." There are a few about boys that like to engage in what society would call "girly" activities (including the title you posted above) such as dance and wearing dresses. http://humaneconnectionblog.blogspot.com/2012/06/12-childrens-picture-books-that.html
Klara Charlton's comment, April 26, 2013 7:22 PM
Thank you Amy!
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Study finds huge gender imbalance in children's literature

Study finds huge gender imbalance in children's literature | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
New research reveals male characters far outnumber females, pointing to 'symbolic annihilation of women and girls'
Klara Charlton's insight:

This represents a historical analysis of Children's Literature in the 20th Century.  One of the most impressive aspects of this is that it is even being openly addressed at all; it speaks volumes about the evolution of feminism and the genre, but there is still plenty of rrom for improvement.

more...
Courtney Davis's comment, April 25, 2013 5:34 PM
This is really interesting! I know there's been a huge movement towards creating strong female characters in young adult literature (and actually I struggle with finding quality YA literature with convincing and inspiring male protagonists), but I think this article highlights the fact that this trend hasn't yet spread to children's books.
Katelyn Nelson's comment, April 25, 2013 6:22 PM
I read this article today and thought of you, Klara. It pertains more to YA literature than to children's lit, but might be worth a look? http://www.delcotimes.com/articles/2013/04/22/life/6bb593b5-3972-4a6f-b8d7-0dbb2bb0e645.txt#.UXYfSmIWTkU.twitter
Klara Charlton's comment, April 25, 2013 8:11 PM
Katelyn, that is a really good article. Thank you! Thank you also Courtney, for sharing your search for books with believable male protagonists. I am relieved to learn that it isn't easy, even for someone with plenty of experience in the field. Perhaps this will be the year that several are published at once, to make up for it.
Rescooped by Klara Charlton from Gender Stereotyping Children
Scoop.it!

Effects of Gender Stereotypes in Children’s Picture Books

Effects of Gender Stereotypes in Children’s Picture Books | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Children's picture books may seem to be the last place where gender stereotypes are present. However, stereotypical messages are evident in picture books and as a result, our children may be limited and restricted to mold into these stereotypes.

Via sarita
Klara Charlton's insight:

I am not certain that even a majority of people really analyze all  iof the effects of the books they read to their children.  It is not an easy task to weigh all of the many important considerations about gender issues, and I wonder what the safest, most neutral way for librarians to address this matter is?

more...
Klara Charlton's comment, April 25, 2013 8:05 PM
Yes! Thank you so much for you comment! So far, I have actully found that there seem to be plenty of books about girls who don't want to be princesses, but I have not found one yet about a boy who wants to play with dolls. I think that we still have a long way to go, but every interaction counts as a chance for positive change.
Klara Charlton's comment, April 25, 2013 8:49 PM
This link represents some of the things that create the struggle: http://www.dw.de/challenging-the-color-pink/a-16765775
Klara Charlton's comment, May 1, 2013 9:40 PM
More scary things occurring every day: http://www.norwalkcitizenonline.com/news/article/With-a-daughter-s-input-Pink-Lemon-Blue-Lime-4470461.php
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

“Are there any girl bears?”: Gender and the 21st Century Picture Book — @fuseeight A Fuse #8 Production

“Are there any girl bears?”: Gender and the 21st Century Picture Book — @fuseeight A Fuse #8 Production | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
@janekohuth asks Are we backsliding when it comes to gender in children's books? http://t.co/FOJjtpANxi via @MrSchuReads Counter examples??
Klara Charlton's insight:

The inspiration for the title of this post is quite frightening as presented.  I wonder what the intent of the author actually was?

more...
Sarah Sullivan's comment, April 26, 2013 12:34 PM
This is a scary, but very important article and I'm glad you shared it here. As a mom to boys, it is disheartening to see how "gendered' things have gotten. I'm doing my best to neutralize things in my home, but it is frustrating when people give ME the hairy eyeball because my son wants the Cinderella book at the Book Fair. And of course I bought it for him - it came with a magic wand and he loves it.
Sarah Sullivan's comment, April 26, 2013 12:35 PM
And don't get me started on the "girl" Legos. Was that really necessary? And yet I be they have been a big moneymaker, further supporting the thought that girls will only like building things if things are pink and purple.
Klara Charlton's comment, April 26, 2013 7:24 PM
Yes, I know. I actually bought my daughter no only Legos (normal), but Kinex. She built "people" and spaceships, and when she took one to school in 6th grade as an assignment (for people to guess who made what), no one guessed that the spaceship was hers.....She had a terrible time finding other girls to build spaceships with. Thank you for your comment, Sarah.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

book review: The Gender Trap: Parents and the Pitfalls of Raising ...

A review of The Gender Trap, an excellent exploration of how parents push--and push back against--gender norms for our children. ... about · archives · my book project · « children's books from feminist readers: Sarah ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Breaking the Mould – it's child's play | GEA – Gender and Education ...

Breaking the Mould – it's child's play | GEA – Gender and Education ... | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Resources for teachers and parents about children's books that challenge gender stereotypes. The National Union of Teachers has been working with a small group of primary schools to challenge 'traditional' gender ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Two New Children’s Books About Gender-Independent Kids

Two New Children’s Books About Gender-Independent Kids | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it

cisprivilege:

(via transitioningdownunder) (Two New Children’s Books About Gender-Independent Kids - cisprivilege: http://t.co/frozgDMX86)

Klara Charlton's insight:

Found this a little late for class...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Olive Senior: 'Literature is political because we are political animals' - The Guardian

Olive Senior: 'Literature is political because we are political animals' - The Guardian | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
The Guardian Olive Senior: 'Literature is political because we are political animals' The Guardian For example, as a child, I grew up in a world where I never saw myself or the people around me visually portrayed in the children's books I read...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Etheldredasplace: Oh no, snippet from article on crazy change in ...

Etheldredasplace: Oh no, snippet from article on crazy change in ... | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
It was sparked by the publication of Sweden's first ever gender-neutral children's book, Kivi och Monsterhund(Kivi and Monsterdog). It tells the story of Kivi, who wants a dog for "hen's" birthday. The male author, Jesper ...
Klara Charlton's insight:

As a final scoop, I think that this presents many interesting possibilities for future children's books.

more...
QMP's comment, April 28, 2013 9:31 PM
I’m really glad that somebody chose to look at gender stereotypes in children’s book. Our culture has so much deep rooted mysogyny in it, that we dont realize just how big the gender gap is. Through literature and media children are very quick to be placed into a stereotype based off their gender, and many people dont take a second glance because its so ingrained.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

10,000 Dresses

10,000 Dresses | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Every night, Bailey dreams about magical dresses: dresses made of crystals and rainbows, dresses made of flowers, dresses made of windows...
Klara Charlton's insight:

I am thrilled to post this book via a link to some contemporary children's books that a colleague shared.  This sounds like an excellent book for a boy who has interests outside of his traditional gender role!  I do also wonder, however, if there are books that support gentleness, or other stereotypically feminine qualities, in boys in a less dramatic way.   Could a boy like aspects of both genders, too?  Why not?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

Project MUSE - Sissies, Dolls, and Dancing: Children's Literature and Gender Deviance in the Seventies

Project MUSE - Sissies, Dolls, and Dancing: Children's Literature and Gender Deviance in the Seventies | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
Klara Charlton's insight:

Although I do not have direct access to this content, even the first page offers several interesting titles to add.  Following up with a search for the complete article could be a great help towards finding more diverse titles.

more...
Klara Charlton's comment, April 25, 2013 9:02 PM
Unfortunately, it stil seems that match ground-breaking work was done in the 1970s, with very little occurring in the 21st century beyond an admission of "guilt," or the problem of gender in Children's Literature in the 21st century.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

THE EVOLUTION OF CALPURNIA TATE- REVIEW AND SIMILAR BOOK SUGGESTIONS

THE EVOLUTION OF CALPURNIA TATE- REVIEW AND SIMILAR BOOK SUGGESTIONS | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
"Mother was awakening to the sorry facts: My biscuits were like stones, my samplers askew, my seams like rickrack."
Klara Charlton's insight:

I found this book on a colleague's Scoopit page, and I think it looks like an excellent book for this topic, because it is deals with a girl who has interests and aspirations that are typically designated for boys of that time period.  Now, to find an equivalent book about a boy who wants to sew and cook.  I wonder if one exists?
 

more...
Kim Rowley's comment, April 25, 2013 8:21 PM
Yes, this is a great choice for your topic of gender stereotypes.
Scooped by Klara Charlton
Scoop.it!

The Duck Who Shared Her Eggs: How Children's Books Approach Modern ... - The Atlantic

The Duck Who Shared Her Eggs: How Children's Books Approach Modern ... - The Atlantic | Gender in Children's Literature | Scoop.it
The Atlantic
The Duck Who Shared Her Eggs: How Children's Books Approach Modern ...
The Atlantic
The Duck Who Shared Her Eggs: How Children's Books Approach Modern Reproduction.
Klara Charlton's insight:

I think that this is an interesting way to approach the complex subject of reproduction in the 21st Century.  There are many picture books here which look like good potential additions to a Children's Library.

more...
Kim Rowley's comment, April 28, 2013 5:31 PM
This would have been a great resource for our discussion forum on books about where babies come from. Thanks for sharing!
Amy Dean's comment, April 28, 2013 7:16 PM
What a great list of resources about modern, non-traditional families that can be used to open up discussion with kids!
Rescooped by Klara Charlton from Gender Stereotyping Children
Scoop.it!

Children's Books Enforce Gender Stereotypes

Take a look (especially if you have children) to see how children's books enforce gender stereotypes and sexist ideas.

Via sarita
Klara Charlton's insight:

This is a passionate presentation by a student.  While I do not believe that there is necessarily enough gender-equal character diversity in the totality of children's literature, at the same time choice of subject, individuality and story integrity must be maintained.  

more...
No comment yet.