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Parole denied for Manson follower Van Houten

Parole denied for Manson follower Van Houten | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Former Charles Manson follower and convicted murderer Leslie Van Houten has been denied parole once again.
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Kevin Bishop's comment, June 13, 2013 5:31 AM
This article is pretty depressing. Houten chose to partake in severe crimes at a young age and it appears that she will continue to live out her days residing in prison. She deserves her punishment but still it is rather depressing that she has been in prison more than double my lifetime. I wonder if after all of those years if she is truly a changed person or if she just knows what response to give at parole hearings.
Lacy Church's comment, June 17, 2013 6:28 PM
I agree with Kevin, I too wonder if her parole hearings are practiced and rehearsed events at this point. Practice makes perfect and after 20 hearings you'd think she would have some idea of what to say. If family of victims and even a former "colleague" hadn't spoken against her I wonder if the parole board would be singing a different song. If she is in relatively good health I would have to believe she may still be a danger and am glad she is still locked up. As she ages and her health deteriorates I could see her being much less of a threat and living out her last days in a home of a different sort.
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Father's Brains Respond Differently to Girls Than Boys

Father's Brains Respond Differently to Girls Than Boys | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
According to a new study, dads are more attentive and responsive to toddler daughters' needs than fathers with sons of the same age.
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I have 3 daughters (no sons), so I have nothing to compare, but I can see how this might be true.  I was the oldest of 4 brothers and I ignored my younger brothers quite a bit...so.....
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Taiwan First Place in Asia to Recognize Same-Sex Marriage

Taiwan First Place in Asia to Recognize Same-Sex Marriage | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Taiwan's Constitutional Court has ruled in favor of same-sex marriage, making the island the first place in Asia to recognize gay unions
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Ariana Grande Stands for Freedom

Ariana Grande Stands for Freedom | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Attacking Grande’s concert has a few other implications, regardless of the extent to which those implications were clear to the attacker, about whom little is yet known other than that ISIS has claimed responsibility. There’s really no exaggeration in saying Grande stands for freedom—female freedom, and also the general freedoms of expression the liberal West aspires to embody.

Grande’s fan base skews female and young, and my colleague Sophie Gilbert writes that the bombing “reminds girls and young women that there will always be people who hate them simply because they were born female.” Compounding that is how the concert itself celebrated female liberation. Grande sings frankly about enjoying independence and sex, and has a reputation for tussling with commenters who call her “whore” or define her by her relationships with famous men. Her most recent album is titled Dangerous Woman. A tweet from December 2016: “expressing sexuality in art is not an invitation for disrespect !!! just like wearing a short skirt is not asking for assault.”
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Woman charged with murder after forcing man to drink bleach

Woman charged with murder after forcing man to drink bleach | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Chicago police said 24-year-old Yasmine Elder was charged Wednesday in the death of 26-year-old Darrius Ellis.

Police say Elder and Ellis were fighting Monday in a parked van when Elder overpowered the man and forced him to drink bleach. Ellis was found by police lying on the ground and was taken to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.
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'Mommy Dead and Dearest' Doc on Gypsy Blanchard: What We Learned

'Mommy Dead and Dearest' Doc on Gypsy Blanchard: What We Learned | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
In July 2016, Gypsy Rose Blanchard was sentenced to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to second-degree murder in the brutal stabbing death (in Springfield, Missouri) of her mother, Clauddine "Dee Dee" Blanchard. It seemed like a remarkably tidy ending for an almost surreally sensational crime. 
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Beyond Gypsy Blancharde: When Mothers Harm Their Kids for Attention
A look inside five cases of Munchausen's syndrome by proxy, a rare and terrifying disorder where parents fake their children's illness
Gypsy, then 24, was arguably the biggest victim of all, having essentially been held hostage by her late mother since she was a young child – a casualty of Munchausen by Proxy, a rare disorder in which a caregiver feigns or induces symptoms of sickness in her charge. 

MBP is widely considered an especially sinister form of child abuse, though not all experts agree that it's a legitimate mental illness. MBP expert Dr. Marc Feldman believes MBP perpetrators like Dee Dee Blanchard exploit their children for sympathy and "emotional gratification," though Blanchard was also doing it for donations, free trips and other fraudulent means of making money. 

Gypsy's plot to kill Dee Dee – which she bragged about on Facebook after the deed was done – was a last-ditch attempt to flee this abuse. (She allegedly carried out the crime with her boyfriend, Nicholas Godejohn, who is still awaiting trial for first-degree murder.) Greene County, Missouri prosecutor Dan Patterson called it "one of the most extraordinary and unusual cases we have seen." So it's natural that the story seized the attention of filmmaker Erin Lee Carr, a crime buff who became fascinated by the case after learning about it in 2015. "I completely fell in love with the story," she tells Rolling Stone. "It's not for the faint of heart. I still think about it all the time."
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Kimber Elena Andruss's comment, May 23, 1:17 PM
This is such a tragically fascinating story to me. I cannot believe the extent that Dee Dee went to to maintain Gypsy's 'illnesses' is just... insane. I wonder if Gypsy will appeal her sentence; I'm sure there are attorneys out there dying to get their hands on this case. The abuse that Gypsy faced for almost two decades coupled with what have got to be some monumental mental illnesses creates such an explosive situation. I would really like to read more about Munchhausen by proxy; I guess I can see why the attention or donations could bring someone to do that, but how do you even start down that road? What makes you look at a 3 mo/old baby and decide to pretend she's sick? I'm also intrigued by Gypsy's father's lack of all knowledge pertaining to the situation. While not blaming him or having unrealistic expectations of me, it does intrigue me that he was as clueless to the situation as he was. Even more interesting is Gypsy's boyfriend, and how that relationship evolved. I will likely be watching this documentary.
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Former Wasilla postmaster demoted to custodian after investigation upholds harassment claims

The postmaster received a U.S. Postal Service notice of removal last year after a sexual harassment investigation. His new position as a custodian started this month.
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Boan White's comment, May 24, 5:09 PM
How many years has the zero Tolerance on sexual harassment been around? You would think by now men would finally get the memo.
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Confessions of a sex trafficker: how Alaska's homeless youth are exploited

Confessions of a sex trafficker: how Alaska's homeless youth are exploited | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Heidi Ross was a senior in high school when she hitchhiked from the Anchorage suburb of Eagle River into the city, leaving a dark childhood behind.

“I didn’t have anywhere to go,” she said of that day, around 20 years ago. “I had the clothes on my back.”


After she arrived, without a way to pay rent, she soon found herself trading sex for a place to stay. Next she traded sex for drugs. Using sex to get things she needed made her feel powerful, she said. At 21, she went to work for a pimp who promised to take care of her.

“It felt strange at first, because I was so used to taking care of myself,” she said. “It felt good. It felt like a piece was missing and it had finally come back.”

Ross said sex work became her “lifestyle”. Eventually, however, she would be the one exploiting young men and women as adrift as she was on that ride into Anchorage.

Sexual exploitation has been an undercurrent of the state’s male-dominated frontier culture since Russian explorers first came to the region, and men flocked to the state during the Gold Rush. Law enforcement, prosecutors and victim advocates have long suspected the state has a high rate of sex trafficking, but the problem has been largely unstudied. Recently, though, a small study of trafficking among homeless youth offered some data to support these suspicions.
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At Least A Third Of All Women Murdered In The U.S. Are Killed By Male Partners

At Least A Third Of All Women Murdered In The U.S. Are Killed By Male Partners | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
It’s a sobering fact. At least one third of all female homicide victims in the U.S. are killed by male intimate partners — husbands and ex-husbands, boyfriends and estranged lovers. While both men and women experience domestic violence, the graphics below should put to rest the myth that abuse occurs equally to both sexes.
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What does this say about paternalism?  Do some men still see the women in their lives as chattel or property?
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Breast-feeding employees charge Frontier Airlines with sex discrimination

Breast-feeding employees charge Frontier Airlines with sex discrimination | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Two flight attendants on Tuesday joined four pilots in filing pregnancy-related discrimination complaints against Frontier Airlines.
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Man Holding Human Head Stabs Worker at Oregon Grocery Store

Man Holding Human Head Stabs Worker at Oregon Grocery Store | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Police say a man carrying what appeared to be a human head stabbed an employee at a grocery store in Oregon, and authorities later found a woman's body at a home.
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Man admits to tricking women into having sex for porn ‘rehearsals’

Man admits to tricking women into having sex for porn ‘rehearsals’ | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A Kansas City-area man has pleaded guilty to duping dozens of women into having sex with him on camera by telling them they were rehearsing …
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Police swap helmets for caps to attract more transgender officers

Police swap helmets for caps to attract more transgender officers | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A police force has replaced helmets with caps in a bid to attract more transgender officers.
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'It's Very Hard To Find a Good Man Here'

'It's Very Hard To Find a Good Man Here' | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
The disappearance of manufacturing and the rise of opioid abuse has hit men in the Rust Belt hard. That’s meant women are left to pick up the pieces.
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Slate: Manchester Bombing ‘Massive Act of Gender-Based Violence’

Slate: Manchester Bombing ‘Massive Act of Gender-Based Violence’ | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Leftist outlet Slate’s hot take on the Muslim suicide blast after an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester was a futile exercise in identity politics and a major embarrassment to say the least.

Via Thomas Wentzel
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Technology's role in human trafficking cannot be ignored

Technology's role in human trafficking cannot be ignored | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
The sexual exploitation of children is difficult to talk about. The idea that some would take advantage of victims so vulnerable and powerless is appalling just to consider. But what’s even harder to admit is that this abuse happens every day, right here at home, in communities all around us. Sarah isn’t from a country far away; she grew up here in the U.S.

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Having met Sarah and many other victims of trafficking, most the same age as my own daughters are now, it’s impossible for me to ignore this issue, no matter how difficult it can be to confront. Thankfully, the U.S. Congress is now speaking loudly for those who in the past have been denied a voice. 
 

This week, there are 12 bills coming before the House that address these awful injustices. They span a range of initiatives: from expanding and enhancing tools for the investigation and prosecution of those who buy and sell sex with children; to ensuring that these offenders are held to account not only through criminal convictions and sentencing but also through lifelong registration and reporting requirements. The bills also make provisions for the treatment, housing, training, and education of trafficking victims. 

Most importantly, these bills seek to ensure that minors who are trafficked are treated as victims rather than as criminals. Rep. Ann Wagner (R-Miss.) — whose Trafficking Survivors Relief Act, a bipartisan proposal with Rep. Karen Bass (D-Calif.), would give survivors a fresh start and an opportunity to recover from trauma, social stigma, and discrimination — puts it aptly, "No victims of trafficking should be criminalized for the horrific exploitation they have endured. These victims deserve a fresh start and a fair shot at rebuilding their lives." 

The Senate has also shown bipartisan leadership in addressing the crime of human trafficking. A recent example was the bipartisan investigation, led by Senators Rob Portman and Claire McCaskill (herself a former sex crimes prosecutor), into the classified advertising portal, Backpage. That investigation led to the shutdown of Backpage’s adult listings, which had become a marketplace for child trafficking.  

I’m also pleased that the executive branch is deeply involved too; I was happy to join a recent roundtable that Ivanka Trump led, gathering bipartisan congressional leadership with anti-human trafficking experts to develop concrete steps to thwart child trafficking.

But technology's role in human trafficking cannot be ignored — as the example of Backpage demonstrates. The sad reality is that three out of four child sex trafficking victims in the U.S. have been exploited online. And perpetrators often make their first connections to victims on the Internet. Backpage is one prominent example, but there were others before. And after Backpage, there will, unfortunately, be new services that pop up — many of which exist in the dark corners of the web and on private peer-to-peer networks. 

So as I applaud congressional efforts to fight child trafficking, I also acknowledge that the tech industry must be part of the solution. This really is an issue where strong policies, technology, and investment, can make a difference in the fight against this ghastly criminal enterprise in our midst.
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'Walk A Mile In Her Shoes' Raises Non-Violence Awareness In Style

'Walk A Mile In Her Shoes' Raises Non-Violence Awareness In Style | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
On a sunny Saturday afternoon at Pioneer Park, Fairbanks community members, including those of law enforcement, and Mayor Mattherly gathered to raise awareness and funds for the Interior Action Center for Non-Violent Living. Men, women, children, and even a polar bear all had the opportunity to show their solidarity in ending violence in the community by not only wearing women's shoes, but walking a mile in them.
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Bill Cosby arrives for jury selection in criminal trial

Bill Cosby arrives for jury selection in criminal trial | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Bill Cosby arrived at a Pittsburgh court this morning in advance of jury selection for his criminal trial, which is slated for next month in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.

The comedian walked into the Allegheny County Courthouse in downtown Pittsburgh just before 9 a.m.

In late February, Judge Steven O’Neill granted a request made by Cosby's legal team to bring in a jury from outside Montgomery County, which the defense argued would allow for a more diverse group.
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Boan White's comment, May 24, 5:02 PM
if being the defining word, Bill Cosby is both rich and famous. It is not common for the rich and famous to be punished to harshly, if at all.
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Mother recounts life of daughter she lost to sex trafficking

Albuquerque detectives say Tobi Stanfill had been sold for sex, held in a dog crate, and tortured before she was found murdered in January.
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Duggar Sisters Suing Police Officials for Breach of Privacy

Duggar Sisters Suing Police Officials for Breach of Privacy | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Jill, Jessa, Jinger and Joy Duggar are suing Springdale, Arkansas, city and police officials, as well as InTouch magazine, over Josh Duggar’s molestation scandal — details
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The Assange rape case has been dropped — but he still faces arrest

The Assange rape case has been dropped — but he still faces arrest | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Two women in Sweden accused the WikiLeaks founder of rape and sexual assault in 2010.
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Police:Father Killed 2 Daughters, Shot Wife in Alamance Counrty

Two children died and their mother is seriously hurt after the father of the family opened fire today in Alamance Counrty, police say.

Laila Goodwin, 4, died in her home , police said. Her older sister, Lashelle Goodwin, 17, was found with multiple gunshot wounds and later died. The children’s mother has serious injuries after she also was shot multiple times.

According to the initial investigation, the children’s father, Carlton Goodwin, 37, shot his wife and daughters one by one and then shot and killed himself.

Neighbors were horrified to learn the girls had died.
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Boan White's comment, May 24, 5:13 PM
You would never see a family mother kill her daughters and husband, just goes to show.
Rob Duke's comment, May 24, 11:04 PM
See this one from last year: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2016/06/30/she-wanted-him-to-suffer-sheriff-explains-why-texas-mom-two-killed-daughters-in-front-of-husband/
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Amid furor over abortion, revised restrictions are expected to cut down on travel

Alaska women will likely be able to get second-trimester abortions inside the state, rather than traveling Outside, after the state medical board approved revised abortion regulations last week.
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The man trap

The man trap | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Traditional ideas of masculinity persist in the workplace, even though men are now expected to do more of the household chores – and work longer hours. Emily Bobrow investigates the trials of modern manhood
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Muslim attire: The state and the veil | The Economist

Muslim attire: The state and the veil | The Economist | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it

IN HER bottle-green nylon skirt and matching veil, Aïcha Khobeizi is an unusual sight on a university campus in strictly secular France. When she first decided to wear a headscarf, at the age of 15, her mother laughed. The elder Mrs Khobeizi, from a village in central Algeria, had stopped covering her hair when she settled in France. Aïcha’s father, a retired dustman, also disapproved. “I had the worst weekend of my life,” she recalls. “But I felt something was missing. I was determined to wear it in order to feel at ease with who I am.”

A garment that Ms Khobeizi and other Muslim women consider to be a private choice is now under intense public scrutiny. As France begins to select a new president, there is a remarkable consensus for upholding curbs on religious dress, which ban the headscarf from public schools and the burqa—a full-body covering with a mesh over the eyes—from public places. François Fillon, a front-runner, backed local bans on the “burkini”, a modest all-in-one swimsuit, last summer and considers the spread of the veil to be part of what he calls “Islamic totalitarianism”. Marine Le Pen, leader of the National Front and possibly Mr Fillon’s opponent in the final round, would like to see both the Muslim hijab and the Jewish yarmulke banned from public places.

In the Netherlands the Senate is mulling a law passed by the lower house that would ban the niqab (which covers most of the face) and the burqa in many public contexts. With elections due in March, that would be a small sop to the ultra-nationalist Freedom Party, which wants a broad crackdown on Islam. Last month Angela Merkel, Germany’s chancellor, told cheering members of her Christian Democratic party that exposing one’s features was part of normal interaction in a liberal society. Face covering, she said, should be banned “where legally possible”.

The strangest clampdown has occurred in Morocco. Earlier this month local officials told shopkeepers that the production, importation and sale of the burqa must end, and made them sign a document agreeing to the change. Burqa-clad women, of whom Morocco has few, promptly posted pictures of themselves on social-media websites. Some asked why the government was not cracking down on prostitutes or short skirts.

In the land of liberty

Anxiety over Muslim dress is running high partly because of a surge in Muslim refugees. In the 12 months to the end of September 2016 almost 1.4m people applied for asylum in Europe—many more than the 260,000 who did so in 2010. Islamist terrorist attacks in Belgium, France and Germany have stirred fears about immigrants. Xenophobic populists are on the march almost everywhere. But there is a deeper cause. Secularist doctrine and Muslim culture are both evolving in a way that causes a clash over attire.

Although Britons dislike mass immigration, they seldom get excited about Muslim dress. Nor do most Americans, although Donald Trump said offhandedly last summer that he “understood” a woman who complained about airline baggage-screeners wearing what she called “heebie-jobbies���. In America the constitution bans any “establishment” (ie, state sponsorship) of religion, and also guarantees the free exercise of faith. Thomas Jefferson’s “wall of separation” between church and state has allowed both to thrive.

France is different. The roots of French political secularism, known as laïcité, go back to the revolution of 1789 and to an anti-clerical campaign in the early 20th century. By 1904 some 10,000 religious schools had been shut; thousands of priests fled France. “We have torn human conscience from the clutches of faith,” declared René Viviani, a Socialist minister.
To France’s current Socialist government, with its strong attachment to laïcité, the row over the burkini was a rematch of 1905. Manuel Valls, then the prime minister and now a run-off candidate in the Socialist presidential primary, said the garment embodied the “enslavement of women”. Its logic, added the women’s minister, Laurence Rossignol, was “to hide women’s bodies in order better to control them”. Many citizens concur. Fully 72% say they would back outlawing the veil from university campuses, and 64% would ban the burkini from beaches.
Muslim dress is contentious in other places where French influence is strong. One is Turkey, whose founders chose the French model when imposing secularism (see article). Another is the mainly French-speaking province of Quebec, in Canada, where a proposed law is being battled over clause by clause.
In 2008 a report for Quebec’s government proposed that judges, Crown prosecutors and police officers should be barred from appearing in a way that proclaims their religious affiliation. The separatist Parti Québécois (PQ) wanted to go much further. It proposed stopping all state representatives, including teachers, from conspicuous displays of belief.

Philippe Couillard, Quebec’s Liberal premier, explains that the province is part of North America and should be guided by Jefferson’s ideas on church-state separation rather than by French laïcité. As a result, the bill now being debated by Quebec’s politicians falls well short of the PQ proposal. It says that people delivering or receiving state services should not cover their faces. But civil servants can wear the hijab. That does not go far enough for critics, some inspired by concern for Quebec’s Catholic heritage (to which the bill makes respectful reference) and others by the battle to throw off Catholic influence. 
In France, Quebec and even Turkey, a growing number of young Muslim women favour a live-and-let-live approach. “There’s no single meaning to the veil,” insists Ndèye Aminata Dia, a Senegalese-born woman working in Paris who has started a fashion line in stylish head-coverings. She wears her veil over a long flower-print skirt and carries a jaunty red handbag. “Wearing it doesn’t mean you are fundamentalist,” she says, “just as you can decide not to wear it, and still behave with modesty.”

Many educated young Muslim women consider themselves the beneficiaries of feminist battles fought by the previous generation. They have no time for arguments favoured by academic feminists about whether the veil is a form of emancipation or oppression. Instead they insist on their right to dress how they like, whether in tight jeans or a full-length niqab, and not to be judged for it.

From this perspective, the government’s attempts to impose and elaborate a dress code are not just an affront to their freedom but further proof of male chauvinism. “I’m a feminist, I consider that I’m equal to men and I wear what I want,” says Fatima El Ouasdi, a student in finance, who wears her skirt short and her hair loose and runs a women’s-rights group. “But the burkini ban really revolted me.”

Yet the trend of “reveiling” among young French women is sincerely regarded by many members of their mothers’ generation and by many politicians as part of a fundamentalist political project. They believe the government has both the right and the duty to oppose it. The French do not view the state merely as a provider of services but as a guarantor of norms. Lending legitimacy to certain individual choices is not just a matter of personal freedom but can have real social consequences.

For evidence, some say, look at the banlieues. The atmosphere in some heavily immigrant suburbs can curb freedom by making it hard not to wear the veil, argues Nadia Ould-Kaci, who co-runs a group called Women of Aubervilliers against the Veil. In recent years, she says, the spread of the veil in her district has reached “worrying” proportions. Girls of North African origin who do not wear it are insulted by being told that “God is ashamed of you.”
The challenge is to defend women from such pressures while affirming individual freedom. “Laïcité used to be about the neutrality of the state,” says Amélie Barras, a political scientist at York University in Canada. “But now it’s more about citizens, and what they can and cannot do.”
One moderate in France’s presidential debate is Emmanuel Macron, a former Socialist minister. He argues that laïcité should not be “vindictive” and focused on prohibition. “I don’t think we need to invent new texts or new laws in order to chase the veil from universities,” he has said. Better to use other legal means of enforcing equality and women’s rights, such as child protection. Perhaps schools could take on the topic as part of civic education, and explain to girls that they can wear what they want within the law and do not have to dress how others tell them.
Such calm, nuanced thinking is rare. But France badly needs to work out how to marry secularism and liberty. If it cannot forge a more tolerant laïcité, it runs the risk of estranging a generation of its own young Muslim women.

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Law enforcement make arrest in decade-old serial sexual assault case

Law enforcement make arrest in decade-old serial sexual assault case | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
An alleged serial rapist wanted by police for more than a decade was arrested Monday.
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