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Mom: Teen Kills Self After Rape

Mom: Teen Kills Self After Rape | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A grieving Canadian mother said Tuesday her daughter hanged herself after she never recovered from an alleged rape by four teenage boys that left her deeply depressed and bullied in her community.
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Gender and Crime
How does gender impact Victimology and Criminology?
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Uber Launches 'Urgent' Probe Into Sexual Harassment Claims

Uber Launches 'Urgent' Probe Into Sexual Harassment Claims | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has pledged to launch an urgent investigation into a former employee's claims of sexual harassment at the company.
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Mystery of a 35-year-old phone call is focus of Robert Durst hearing

Mystery of a 35-year-old phone call is focus of Robert Durst hearing | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
The prosecution and defense sparred over whether Durst's wife made the call — or someone pretending to be her.
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Women Are Less Likely to Apply for Executive Roles If They’ve Been Rejected Before

Although women make up 40% of the global workforce, they hold only 24% of senior management roles around the world — a figure that has not changed significantly over the past decade. Of chief executive officers of S&P 500 firms, only about 5% are women. Why aren’t more talented women moving up? Researchers have pointed to an array of reasons, from explicit discrimination to promotion processes that quietly favor men, but one of the most perplexing is that women themselves aren’t as likely as men to put themselves forward for leadership roles through promotions, job transfers, and high-profile assignments.

Women begin their careers with ambitions that are just as high as their male peers, but before long they scale back their goals and shy away from competing for these jobs. The reason, many assume, is because women are risk averse or lack confidence, or maybe because they have different career preferences than their male colleagues do. But our research suggests another reason.

We recently conducted a study of more than 10,000 senior executives who were competing for top management jobs in the UK. We found that women were indeed less likely than men to apply for these jobs, but here’s the interesting part: We found that women were much less likely to apply for a job if they had been rejected for a similar job in the past. Of course, men were also less likely to apply if they had been rejected, but the effect was much stronger for women — more than 1.5 times as strong.

The implications here are not trivial, because rejection is a routine part of corporate life. Employees regularly get rejected for promotions, job transfers, important project assignments, and so on. To reach the top of the organization, people need to keep playing the game, over and over again, even after repeated disappointments. So even small differences between how men and women respond to rejection could lead to big differences over time.

To investigate this effect further, we interviewed top women executives about their experiences in recruitment processes and found a common complaint: dissatisfaction and frustration with how those processes were managed. For example, the CFO of a biotech company recalled that she had been considered for a CEO position. After failing to get the job after many rounds of interviews, she had been left with the impression that she was asked to apply merely because she was female and the firm needed a woman on the shortlist — not because the company was serious about hiring her. This may or may not have been true, but that’s the impression she had, and as a result she said she would be unlikely to put herself through a similar process in the future.


This was not an isolated anecdote. We heard many similar stories in our interviews, and results from a survey and randomized experiment conducted with executives confirmed that female managers weren’t dropping out after being rejected because of risk aversion or a lack of confidence. It’s not that they didn’t think they were good enough; they were withdrawing from the corporate race because of concerns that they would not be valued or truly accepted at the highest levels in the organization. Often that feeling was a result of the way hiring and promotion processes were being managed (or mismanaged), sending women subtle (and sometimes overt) signals that the highest rungs of the corporate ladder were intended only for men.

In line with these findings, we discovered that women tend to place greater weight than men do on the fairness of the recruitment and selection processes. This is because fair treatment is interpreted by female managers as a signal that they belong and are accepted in the executive community. Moreover, women who are rejected tend to perceive their treatment as less fair than men do.

While this could sound to some like sour grapes (e.g., “I didn’t win, therefore the contest was rigged”) our findings suggest something subtler. Women’s decisions to remove themselves from competition after having been rejected is driven partly by their experience of being a negatively stereotyped minority in the executive labor market. Think about it — women executives were coming to the table with past experiences of being in the minority, and they may have been in situations in which they felt like outsiders or felt that their leadership ability wasn’t recognized. Because the majority of men had generally not been subject to these same situations, men were less likely to take rejection as a signal that they did not belong in the corner offices, and therefore such disappointments had less of a negative impact on their willingness to apply again.

And, by the way, this same underlying mechanism should apply to any underrepresented group. In other words, what we found is not that there’s something unique about women; it’s that women are a minority, and minorities are often not perceived as legitimate leaders. Indeed, we would expect that men would behave in the same way in contexts where they were seen as illegitimate or outsiders.

These results have important managerial implications. For any company wanting to improve its gender diversity at the senior levels, the most important thing is to avoid the temptation to solely focus on encouraging more women to throw their hat into the ring. That approach misses the mark because it doesn’t address the underlying problem that female executives may feel that the company doesn’t truly believe that they belong in top management. This can be true whether or not the organization is actually contributing to that feeling. In fact, issuing blanket encouragements to women to apply for leadership positions could even backfire if it means the company ends up rejecting more women. Our research suggests this will make those women less likely to apply for similar jobs in the future, compounding the company’s gender problem.

Companies must take a hard look at their recruiting and promotion processes to assess whether they are indeed fair — and, just as important, whether those processes are perceived to be fair, especially by women and other minorities. A series of questions can help make that determination: Does the company have the right procedures in place to manage rejection in recruitment and promotion processes? For example, does it give appropriate feedback to candidates who are rejected? What signals is it sending to both men and women who are rejected? Companies need to look beyond recruitment and promotion and ask themselves whether they foster a sense of belonging and how they can ensure that underrepresented groups don’t feel overlooked or slighted. By addressing any deficiencies in the above, firms can begin to chip away at their glass ceilings. After all, when it comes to gender diversity, it’s not so much a matter of getting women to lean in; it’s more a matter of preventing them from leaning out.

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Boyfriend of Missing College Student Zuzu Verk Arrested Day after Unidentified Remains Found

Boyfriend of Missing College Student Zuzu Verk Arrested Day after Unidentified Remains Found | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Robert Fabian was arrested on a warrant for tampering with, or fabricating, physical evidence by concealing a human corpse.
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Caitlin Mattingly's comment, February 7, 5:23 PM
It is always someone you know. The people closest to you are the ones who statistically will harm you or kill you. Makes you think doesnt it?
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NYPD to Retrain Amid Controversy Over Handling of Rapes, Women's Group Told

Women's rights advocates met with Police Commissioner James O'Neill.
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Panel recommends parole for Spears, one of four convicted in gruesome killings, rape in Modesto

Panel recommends parole for Spears, one of four convicted in gruesome killings, rape in Modesto | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Members of a state parole board panel recommended that Marty Don Spears, the ringleader among four teens convicted in the 1979 murders of Phillip and Kathy Ranzo in Modesto, be released over objections by victims’ family members, others. Gov. Brown has 90 days to review the decision and either allow it to stand or deny it.
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Prosecutor calls pimp's Los Angeles killings 'cold' and 'calculated' - MyNewsLA.com

Prosecutor calls pimp's Los Angeles killings 'cold' and 'calculated' - MyNewsLA.com | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
The killings of two men by the alleged head of a robbery-prostitution ring amounted to first-degree murder, a prosecutor told jurors Monday.
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Survey: Alaska women report 'very high' rate of stalking

According to the survey, half of Alaska women who experienced intimate-partner or sexual violence in their lifetimes were also stalked.
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Courtney Antilla's comment, January 20, 12:27 PM
I find it very sad as well as unnerving to know what some of these woman have had to go through. I imagine stalking is similar to sexual assaults were it is difficult for the victim to come forward, go though with court proceedings and have to relive those horrifying moments over and over again.
Rob Duke's comment, January 22, 8:41 PM
Yup, I think this flies under the radar. Some of this may be the shy uncomfortable guy who comes off as "creepy", but is probably harmless....but much of this is just a male-dominated culture that enables this behavior.
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Woman shot by police after officers find 3 bodies at home

Police in southeastern Kentucky say officers shot a woman brandishing a handgun after she allegedly killed her husband and two teenage daughters at their home.

Whitley County Sheriff Colan Harrell says officers were called to the home of Larry and Courtney Taylor Friday night after a relative went there to check on the family.

Harrell told The Lexington Herald-Leader that 41-year-old Courtney Taylor pointed a gun at two deputies who arrived at the home. One of the deputies shot her. She was taken to University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital with life-threatening injuries. Her condition was not known Saturday afternoon.

Police found three people dead inside the home, Larry Taylor, 51, and the couple's two teenage daughters.

Harrell says the family members had been dead for several hours before being found.
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Old Misogynist Hatreds Fuel a New Year’s Massacre in Brazil · Global Voices

Old Misogynist Hatreds Fuel a New Year’s Massacre in Brazil · Global Voices | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
It's a disturbing notion, but much about Sidnei Ramis de Araújo is hardly unusual, when it comes to gender-based violence.

His father described him as “a sweet person, who never smoked or drank.” As anthropologist Debora Diniz pointed out in a op-ed for Brasil Post (Brazil's version of The Huffington Post), “madness does not explain the misogynistic fantasies in the killer’s mind” — even if he was a “psychopath.” Diniz added: “Sidnei killed because he couldn’t stand the break-up or the law enforcement against his patriarchal abuse, because he lost his domestic domain as the sovereign.”

And Sidnei was not alone. After the news of the massacre broke out, several people tried to “make sense” of the killer’s motives. Some even justified his actions. This time without satire, the parody website Sensacionalista published several comments circulating online in support of the shooter:
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Woman lied about providing sexual favor to cop to avoid ticket in Jefferson County, police say

Woman lied about providing sexual favor to cop to avoid ticket in Jefferson County, police say | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A woman who reported to authorities that she performed a sexual favor to avoid a ticket after being pulled over in Jefferson County has confessed she fabricated the story, police say.

There was no sexual favor, and in fact, she wasn’t pulled over that day, according to Jefferson County Sheriff David L. Marshak. He said authorities spent more than 160 man-hours investigating her claim before she admitted fabricating the story.

The woman, Brenda L. Hawkins, of Arnold, was charged Thursday with making a false report. She was being held in lieu of $1,000, cash-only bail.
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UPS drivers trained to spot human trafficking

“UPS Freight is in a unique position to help identify traffickers and trafficking victims by educating our drivers and management on this epidemic impacting our local communities,” Rich McArdle, president of UPS Freight, said in the release. “We are proud to take a stand in fighting human trafficking and look forward to working with Truckers Against Trafficking on this initiative that will save lives.”

Training is taking place on site around the country, Ross said. Each UPS driver also receives a wallet card that contains helpful phone numbers and instructs drivers what to do if they identify trafficking on the road. The card also identifies "trafficking red flags," which include a person who:

exhibits restricted or controlled communication
has a disheveled appearance or is crying
is a minor traveling without adult supervision 
does not know the person who is picking them up
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Husband of murdered mom addresses attack

Husband of murdered mom addresses attack | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Ashland, Ore. – The father of a 12-year-old Ashland boy who allegedly killed his mother and wounded his sister took to Facebook addressing the attack. Ashland Police said Pamela Wolosz was fatally stabbed by her own son on Tuesday. The 12-year-old also... #ashland #ashlandhomicide #ashlandmurder
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ISP wants to speak to this man and anyone who was near Delphi trail when two teens went missing

ISP wants to speak to this man and anyone who was near Delphi trail when two teens went missing | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Indiana State Police are hoping someone can help them identify the man in this photo who was walking on the Delphi Historic Trail around the time Abigail Williams and Liberty German were ther
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These Are the Places With the World's Top Female Murder Rate

These Are the Places With the World's Top Female Murder Rate | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Despite their reputation for safety, countries in Northeast Asia have the highest rate of female homicide victims in the world.
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Violence Against Women: Female Genital Mutilation Statistics For FGM International Awareness Day

Violence Against Women: Female Genital Mutilation Statistics For FGM International Awareness Day | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
More than 200 million girls and women have undergone FGM surgery.
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Caitlin Mattingly's comment, February 7, 5:20 PM
Violence against women needs to stop. Violence against any group of peoples needs to stop. This is just sickening. I think anyone associated with performing these genital mutilations needs to be placed in prison.
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How 'Male Champions' Can Help Women In The WorkPlace

How 'Male Champions' Can Help Women In The WorkPlace | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
I’ve been so lucky to work with and learn from male champions that at this point, I just expect it. These four traits define a good male mentor.
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A violent offender's last act, a lesson for law enforcement - The Portland Press Herald

She signed up for a seven-hour firearms training course the next day.

But before she ever made it to her class, Strobel stormed back into her life in a hail of gunfire, seriously wounding Almeida and killing another man before dying in a shootout with police.

His violent last act fit a lifelong pattern of abuse and manipulation of women. Strobel’s first marriage collapsed after he sexually assaulted his mother-in-law, then threatened to kill his estranged wife if she didn’t return to him. In two relationships between 1991 and 2001, Strobel assaulted the women after they broke up with him. Goulet, his most recent romantic relationship, was victimized by Strobel in 2010, when he choked her while intoxicated during an argument.

To the people who knew him, Strobel was obviously dangerous, yet each new criminal charge against him resulted in minor jail time. His strategy was simple: Cut a deal with prosecutors, plead guilty quickly and do minimal jail time. Don’t give the cops or the courts a reason to probe deeper into his criminal history. And it worked.
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Caitlin Mattingly's comment, January 31, 5:25 PM
I believe the justice system failed in this case. This monster kept repeating offenses throughout his life and abusing people because he knew he could get away with it with only a slap on the wrist. It is people like him who do eventually kill someone just as he did. Obviously there should be enhanced penalties for repeated offenses. Hopefully we can prevent more crimes from those same people by doing so.
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Man Accused of Inappropriately Touching Girls at Camp

Man Accused of Inappropriately Touching Girls at Camp | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A Los Angeles probation officer was due in court Thursday after he was charged with sexually assaulting girls at a youth camp, according to the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office.
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Sex selection in Asia: From too few girls to too many men | The Economist

Sex selection in Asia: From too few girls to too many men | The Economist | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A FEW years ago it looked like the curse that would never lift. In China, north India and other parts of Asia, ever more girls were being destroyed by their parents. Many were detected in utero by ultrasound scans and aborted; others died young as a result of neglect; some were murdered.
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North Pole Man Sentenced To 9 Months For Trying To Burn Wife's House Down | CBS News 13

North Pole Man Sentenced To 9 Months For Trying To Burn Wife's House Down | CBS News 13 | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
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The Sexist Law That Leaves Children Stateless

The Sexist Law That Leaves Children Stateless | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
A generation of children will grow up without a country because Lebanese mothers with foreign-born husbands cannot pass on their nationality to their children.

Via Caroline Claeys, gender issues-human rights, Sheunesu Hove
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Swimming together, living together: The meaning of a European court verdict on Muslim girls and school swimming lessons | The Economist

Swimming together, living together: The meaning of a European court verdict on Muslim girls and school swimming lessons | The Economist | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
AZIZ OSMANOGLU and his wife Sehabat Kocabas were both born in Turkey around 40 years ago, but they are long-standing residents of the city of Basel. Mr Osmanoglu migrated to Switzerland at the age of 10, but later moved back to pursue advanced Islamic studies in his homeland, where he met his spouse. Eventually, he brought her to Basel.

For many years, the couple has been in dispute with the local authorities over whether or not their two older daughters, born in 1999 and 2001, should have been obliged to take part in mixed swimming along with the other boys and girls when they were at primary school. In 2010 they were obliged to pay 1400 Swiss Francs (about as many American dollars) as a penalty for keeping their daughters away from sessions at the pool.   

This week, the European Court of Human Rights gave its verdict on the case. It upheld the right of the regional authorities of Basel to impose the fine, vindicating the view of the Swiss government. Any infringement of the family's religious freedom was over-ridden by the authorities’ right and duty to provide children with basic education, the judges found. This included imparting the ability not only to swim but to live together in a cohesive society. As the verdict noted, “in the [Swiss] government’s view, if it was only a question of learning to swim, compulsory lessons would stop as soon as all pupils were able to swim...[But] the very fact of engaging in this activity together with other pupils is an important element of the course...”
A significant feature of the case was that the school authorities had gone some way to accommodate the family’s sensitivities: they agreed that the girls could wear a head-to-toe burkini (the garment which caused uproar on French beaches last summer) and change in a strictly gender-segregated area.
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Courtney Antilla's comment, January 20, 12:34 PM
Coming from a swimming background I find this particularly interesting. I think everyone should learn how to swim, it is a basic survival skill especially for those of us who grew up around water. I understand the parents wanting the girls to wear burkinis but for someone who cannot swim to wear that much fabric in the water can be very dangerous. Clothes can pull you down so quickly, I imagine there has to be a safer way to teach the girls how to swim. I also think everyone should have access to gender segregated changing areas. This case is a great example in my mind of how difficult it can be to combine different religions, ethnic backgrounds, and personalities and ask them to live together peacefully. It is never easy.
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22 Of The Craziest, Creepiest and Funniest Cosplay Experiences - Suggest.com

22 Of The Craziest, Creepiest and Funniest Cosplay Experiences - Suggest.com | Gender and Crime | Scoop.it
Cosplay is a hobby enjoyed by thousands of people across the country. Most of the time, it's honest, good clean fun. Sometimes people take it WAY too far somethings, these are their stories.
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The simple and normal things that we all do, but are creepier for women....
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LA Metro starts counseling line to combat sexual harassment

Aiming to combat sexual harassment on public transportation, the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority unveiled an around-the-clock counseling hotline Wednesday to provid
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