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60 Things Students Can Create To Demonstrate What They Know - TeachThought

60 Things Students Can Create To Demonstrate What They Know - TeachThought | General Issues | Scoop.it
Nowadays, many educators use the same methods over and over again in their lessons for students to express themselves and demonstrate their new knowledge. Today’s students want to express themselves in a variety of different ways. They want their academic work to be relevant, engaging and fun.

Below is a diverse list adapted from resources found at fortheteachers.org of potential student products or activities learners can use to demonstrate their mastery of lesson content. The list also offers several digital tools for students to consider using in a technology-enriched learning environment.

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, October 17, 12:57 AM
Love this - and need it- innovative assessment.
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Variety to keep things fresh
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Our Favorite Gadgets: Best Tech Gifts 2016

Our Favorite Gadgets: Best Tech Gifts 2016 | General Issues | Scoop.it
Celebrate the holidays with a better future. With the right gadget gift, you can bring home some long-promised tech leaps, from virtual reality to Wi-Fi that actually works. Here’s what we’d actually buy for our loved ones—or ourselves.

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Genial.ly - Create Interactive Infographics

Genial.ly - Create Interactive Infographics | General Issues | Scoop.it
Genial.ly is the best web tool to create engaging interactive visual content (pictures, posters, presentations, etc) for people without programming skills.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, November 21, 4:58 AM

This looks like a great free tool for creating interactive infographics.

רונית יעקב's curator insight, November 22, 3:57 PM
אינפוגרפיקה אינטראקטיבית
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40 Most Awesome iPad Apps for Science Students - BestCollegesOnline.com

40 Most Awesome iPad Apps for Science Students - BestCollegesOnline.com | General Issues | Scoop.it
The iPad has found its way into hospitals, retail stores and homes across the nation, but it’s also making a big splash in the classroom, even with some of the best online colleges. With a great selection of apps focused on everything from word processing to keeping in touch with classmates, the tablet computer can be an invaluable tool for learning — no matter your age. Online science students haven’t been left out, of course, and there are a wide range of applications offering help with chemistry, biology, astronomy and even the math that comes along with certain fields. If you’re a college student looking to supplement your science studies, these apps are some of the best for learning, sharing, researching and just plain having fun.

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5 Tools to Convert and Edit The PDF Format

5 Tools to Convert and Edit The PDF Format | General Issues | Scoop.it
There are a number of tools that make working with PDFs a lot easier. Starting with a simple way to convert files, we feature five PDF related tools.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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wepop123's curator insight, December 2, 12:09 AM
There are a number of tools that make working with PDFs a lot easier. Starting with a simple way to convert files, we feature five PDF related tools.
 
Flores Marisol's curator insight, December 2, 9:09 AM
Useful tools!
Rosa Mª Fernández's curator insight, December 3, 8:04 AM
Herramientas útiles para PDF
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12 Amazing Engineering Projects for Kids

12 Amazing Engineering Projects for Kids | General Issues | Scoop.it
I am joining my friends from Kid Blogger Network in a round up of topics interesting for parents and caregivers looking for fun activities to do with their kids. Since my 7 year old is very convinced that she will become an engineer, specifically, a mechanical engineer, I want to share 12 amazing engineering projects for kids from the blogosphere including, of course, ideas from this blog.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, November 11, 7:38 PM

Check this out! Thanks to John Evans.

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CRTC should update ISP rules on differential pricing

CRTC should update ISP rules on differential pricing | General Issues | Scoop.it
The CRTC should be guided by its long-standing principle that telecom regulation should restrict the ability of ISPs to determine winners and losers
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Rex Murphy: Jordan Peterson — a real professor, at last

Rex Murphy: Jordan Peterson — a real professor, at last | General Issues | Scoop.it
How dare the University of Toronto intimidate a man who made his case reasonably and in public.
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Geology IN: 4.4 billion-year-old Zircon is oldest piece of Earth

Geology IN: 4.4 billion-year-old Zircon is oldest piece of Earth | General Issues | Scoop.it
This zircon, which is about twice the width of a human hair, is now confirmed to be the oldest bit of the Earth's crust eve
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New digital taxes may be the future of Cancon

New digital taxes may be the future of Cancon | General Issues | Scoop.it
The Canadian Heritage Minister has opened the door to an overhaul of Canadian cultural policy, but the question is how to pay for it
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Psychologists study intense awe astronauts feel viewing Earth from space

Psychologists study intense awe astronauts feel viewing Earth from space | General Issues | Scoop.it
By analyzing accounts of awe that result from seeing Earth from space, psychologists delve deep into the psychology of astronauts.
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America treats its bold revolution as a reliquary – Caroline Winterer | Aeon Essays

In treating the nation’s founders as holy relics, America forgets they were revolutionaries and risk-takers
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Geena Davis' Two Easy Steps to Make Hollywood Less Sexist (Guest Column)

Geena Davis' Two Easy Steps to Make Hollywood Less Sexist (Guest Column) | General Issues | Scoop.it
STORY: Oprah Winfrey on Forgoing Motherhood, Being 'Counted Out' and the Meeting That Turned OWN Around
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Connectivism – the knowledge of the connected individual

Connectivism – the knowledge of the connected individual | General Issues | Scoop.it
Knowledge is everywhere. In a mobile phone, a fitness tracker and our brains. Not a science fiction film but the learning theory of connectivism. Recently over a coffee

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Mona K. Haug's curator insight, November 29, 4:40 AM
Kunnskapen er overalt.
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 29, 12:17 PM

Lucid post, presenting interesting data. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in business management, please visit http://blogwgs.tumblr.com/

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, December 1, 2:35 PM

Excellent concepts, what do you think?

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It turns out - people who talk to themselves aren't crazy, they're geniuses

It turns out - people who talk to themselves aren't crazy, they're geniuses | General Issues | Scoop.it
Have you ever found yourself having a conversation with, well, yourself? Have you ever then turned red with embarrassment as you notice those around you watching you, giving you stares, and pointing to “the crazy person”? As it turns out, there’s actually no reason to be embarrassed at all. You’re probably just a genius. How …
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4 Ambitious Companies Disrupting Under-the-Radar Industries

4 Ambitious Companies Disrupting Under-the-Radar Industries | General Issues | Scoop.it
It's true that necessity is the mother of invention. Need proof? Just take a gander at these completely necessary fast-growing businesses.
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Thinking Critically through Digital Media

Thinking Critically through Digital Media | General Issues | Scoop.it

Through the use of these materials I hope teachers can develop more actively and intellectually critical students who approach digital media with the ability not only to comprehend and consume information but also understand the possible bias, motivation and underlying values of those creating the information. I believe these skills and abilities are key to creating a more tolerant, open-minded and critically aware global society.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, November 19, 1:28 AM

The rationale behind my latest ebook.

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Technology Tips Newsletter - Visual Note Taking and Sketchnoting

Technology Tips Newsletter - Visual Note Taking and Sketchnoting | General Issues | Scoop.it
Find the best resources about visual note taking and sketchnoting that allow individuals to utilize drawing and images when capturing and representing ideas for class assignments, during training, meetings or conferences.

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, November 12, 1:21 PM

Do you teach your students alternative methods for note taking? Outlining and listing have their place. Think of visual note taking as a way to differentiate your instruction. Learn more about it in this overview from Shannon Mersand.

Ines Bieler's curator insight, November 15, 11:17 AM

Do you teach your students alternative methods for note taking? Outlining and listing have their place. Think of visual note taking as a way to differentiate your instruction. Learn more about it in this overview from Shannon Mersand.

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Is 3D printing suitable for Education?

Is 3D printing suitable for Education? | General Issues | Scoop.it
Three years ago I was introduced to the world of 3D printing. I was shown several machines and how an individual machine was being used in schools to inspire students to make and create. Of course,…

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5 Ways to Cultivate Creativity in Life and Work

5 Ways to Cultivate Creativity in Life and Work | General Issues | Scoop.it
I believe that all human beings are creative, and that creative thinking is a central part of self-expression. Self-expression is a gift we give ourselves and the world. Creativity, therefore, is at the heart of being fully engaged in life and work. Creativity, like any other skill, can be fostered and developed. Under the right conditions, the muse (creative inspiration) will visit each and every one of us in its own unique way.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 28, 12:00 PM
I believe that all human beings are creative, and that creative thinking is a central part of self-expression. Self-expression is a gift we give ourselves and the world. Creativity, therefore, is at the heart of being fully engaged in life and work. Creativity, like any other skill, can be fostered and developed. Under the right conditions, the muse (creative inspiration) will visit each and every one of us in its own unique way.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/10/26/luxembourg-education-interviews-creativity-and-maker-spaces-maach3-ltettelbruck/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Creativity

 

 

Almudena's curator insight, October 29, 7:09 AM
i
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 1, 6:13 AM

Creativity is a very important topic and often overlooked by companies. For those who speak the Spanish or Portuguese, more about creativity and innovation can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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The Most Dangerous Mindset That Is Killing Your Success, and How to Silence It

The Most Dangerous Mindset That Is Killing Your Success, and How to Silence It | General Issues | Scoop.it
The Most Dangerous Mindset That Is Killing Your Success, and How to Silence It
Positive mindsets are not enough to achieve our goals. We must shed the negative mindsets that undermine our beliefs that we are capable of greatness.

BY MARISSA LEVIN
Founder and CEO, Successful Culture@marissalevin

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CREDIT: Getty Images

Mindset is the single most important factor in stabilizing our challenges. I intentionally use the word "stabilize" because the truth is that life will continue to surprise us and knock us down. Unless we live in a bubble, unless we choose a life of complete safety, we are at risk for turmoil.

I write often about the positive mindsets we need to push through difficulty: Intention, choosing to be a victor instead of a victim, and embracing life like a marathoner.

Given the transformative power our thoughts have on our psyches and therefore our outcomes, I'll explain how one mindset, scarcity, will undermine your focus and sabotage your success, and how to silence it.

We all bump up against a lack of resources in our lives: time, money, knowledge, help, or any other resource we may need to accomplish a task or to make progress. When this happens, we often unconsciously move into a scarcity mindset.

This mindset forces us to focus on what we are lacking, rather than on what we have. Those with a scarcity mindset believe that there's a limited amount of everything, and they fear they won't get their share.

It forces us to take a myopic approach to life, in which we focus on what is right in front of us rather than on possibility and growth.

Scarcity mindset compels us to cling to what may not be good for us because of the fear of loss or change.

Scarcity also diminishes our ability to make decisions. Like a magnet, it pulls us away from focusing on activities that can fuel our growth.

Deloitte developed a five-phase vicious cycle of scarcity thinking that kicks in when we experience an unmet, urgent need:

Top-down, strategic thinking is involuntarily interrupted by a bottom-up response ("What is happening? What do I need to react to?").
Attention and energy is focused on meeting the unmet need, at the expense of other important concerns ("Everything else can wait. I need to fix this now").
Constant trade-off decisions deplete self-control ("I'm at the mercy of situations I did not plan for and do not want").
Decision fatigue and lack of cognitive vigilance emerge ("I am exhausted, and I cannot think straight to make good decisions").
Myopic decision-making and borrowing from the future result ("I have to fix what is right in front of me. Everything else can wait").
This cycle is what happens to your brain when scarcity takes over.

Overcoming scarcity
So how do we eliminate the scarcity mindset? The answer is not to rid ourselves of the situation that may trigger the mindset. That is unrealistic. Rather, we must build buffers into our day that allow us to calmly assess our situations, and place them in the right context of the bigger picture.

What we focus on grows. If we divert all of our attention to the one circumstance that negatively triggers us, the rest of the positive areas in our life will suffer.

Here are five things we can do daily to shift from a scarcity mindset to an abundance mindset:

1. Practice gratitude every day. Especially on my most stressful days, I live from a place of gratitude and remind myself that my "problems" are minimal compared with the problems of so many across the globe.

2. Shut down the external negativity. What messages are you allowing into your world? The constant barrage of negative political information, racial tensions, terror attacks, escalated violence, etc., naturally evoke feelings of fear and lack of control. I rarely watch TV. I listen to uplifting podcasts. I've disengaged from social media platforms. We can all control our external influences, which have tremendous psychological and emotional consequences.

3. Share with others. Few activities in life deliver a sense of purpose and fulfillment like sharing with others. We all have much to give--our time, knowledge, experience, inspiration, or other resources we may not need but others desperately do.

4. Incorporate mental breaks and time buffers into your day. Moving through the day, without time to pause and recharge, creates a mental state of chaos and exhaustion. People will always want more from us. We must be our own advocates and protect our energy.

5. Remember that everything is impermanent--the good and the bad. Nothing lasts forever. It may drag on, but ultimately all situations resolve themselves. You are not defined by any one scenario in your life. You are the totality of all that you have been, all that you have achieved. Balance your focus and energy in a way that allows you engage in the good of your life, rather than only focusing on the negative.

You have the power to reject scarcity and choose abundance. Good luck!

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The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.

PUBLISHED ON: OCT 10, 2016
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What Happened When I Moved My Company To A 5-Hour Workday

What Happened When I Moved My Company To A 5-Hour Workday | General Issues | Scoop.it
What Happened When I Moved My Company To A 5-Hour Workday
A little over a year ago, Tower Paddle Boards started letting employees leave by lunchtime and offering 5% profit-sharing.

[Photo: Flickr user Hairi]
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STEPHAN AARSTOL 08.30.16 5:00 AM
In every office, I've often felt, there are just a few people who do three times the work of everyone else, yet their reward is only marginally higher. As an entrepreneur, I've been managing my own productivity time—not on-the-clock-time—pretty effectively for over 15 years, and I've largely been able to work fewer hours than my friends in the corporate world. So when I started Tower, my company that sells stand-up paddle boards, I figured (or at least hoped) that I could hire just these types and give them a better deal in the process.

So while we operated on a standard eight-hour workday at first, just like most other companies, I wanted to put my theory to the test. And it also seemed like freeing up employees' afternoons for the outdoor lifestyle the company promoted would be a natural fit. So on June 1, 2015, I initiated a three-month test. I moved my whole company to a five-hour workday where everyone works from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Over a year later, we're sticking with it. Here's why, and how we made the change work.

MAKING THE SWITCH
When we kicked off the pilot program, I told my employees I wanted to give them two things. First, I simply wanted to give them their lives back—so they'd have a pass to walk out each day right at 1 p.m. as long as they proved highly productive. Second, I wanted to pay them better for more the more focused effort that would take. Their per-hour earnings were set to nearly double overnight: we'd be rolling out 5% profit-sharing at the same time.

By trimming your workday down to five hours, time management comes baked into the pie.
Prior to the switch, an employee making $40,000 a year would've been paid $20 per hour ($40,000 divided by 2,000 hours per year). With the profit-sharing program leading to about $8,000 per person, that same employee would now make about $48,000 but only have a baseline of 1,250 hours per year, so their per-hour earnings would jump to $38.40. And it was crucial to me that this didn't increase the company's expenses by a single dime—there'd be no increased financial risk to our bottom line.

In exchange, though, I had a big ask: I needed each of my team members to be twice as productive as the average worker. We had a high bar of productivity to clear before this, and that didn't change. I told them they just needed to figure out how to do it all in just five hours now—but there'd be support: we'd all need to figure it out and were in this together. If anybody couldn't, though, they'd be fired. The pressure was real, but so was the incentive to meet the challenge; their workweek had suddenly become better than many people's vacation weeks.

–– ADVERTISEMENT ––



The results have been astounding. We've been named to the Inc. 5000 list of America's fastest growing companies the past two years (we ranked #239 in 2015). This year, our 10-person team will generate $9 million in revenue.

A LEAP OF FAITH, MADE FOR GOOD REASONS
To make sure we didn't bite off more than we could chew, I termed the pilot program "summer hours," and set the expectation that we'd go back to traditional hours in the fall. This made some room to keep an eye on anything that might go wrong. I was concerned that our reduced customer-service hours and shop hours would mean an equal reduction in revenue. My gut told me that attracting better people, making them happy, and getting out of their way would compensate for these limitations, but we'd need to prove that. I actually suspected things would go down a bit, but the net effect would be worth it.

The reality is that we didn't take a hit at all. Our annual revenues for 2015 were up over 40%. All our numbers were improving, in fact. When I tell people my team only works five hours a day, their response is always, "That’s nice, but it won’t work for me." The 9-to-5 workday (or worse) is so ingrained that it's hard to imagine anything else.

Being a beach lifestyle company, where our whole brand is wrapped up the notion of a healthy work-life balance, the idea that should be working differently, too, if we truly wanted to live differently, wasn't as much a leap. But if you ask me, we're more of an online marketing agency that happens to own a surf brand. There's no reason that virtually any company that employees a large chunk of knowledge workers can't cut its hours by 30% and still succeed.

The case against ballooning hours is familiar to most and doesn't need to be rehearsed. Humans aren't machines; productivity declines the longer you spend with your nose to the grind. On the flip side, it's been found that happier workers are more productive. Having time to pursue your passions, nurture your relationships, and stay active gives you more emotional and physical energy overall—including to do your job well.

But there's a less-discussed upside to a shorter workweek, too. In their book Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much, Sendhil Mullainathan and Eldar Shafir write that having less time creates periods of heightened productivity called "focus dividends." By trimming your workday down to five hours, time management comes baked into the pie, forcing high-value activities to take priority.

HOW TO MAKE WORKING LESS WORK FOR EVERYONE
To be sure, a five-hour workday might not work for every type of worker. But for the vast majority of knowledge workers, clocking fewer hours that generate higher productivity is feasible if you keep these tips in mind:

1. Apply the 80-20 rule. You've heard this one before, but it's critical. The well-known Pareto Principle dictates that 80% of production comes from 20% of efforts. If you can identify those 20% activities in your company's typical workday, you'll be able to cut the rest.

2. Shift to a production mind-set. Stop measuring work in hours and start measuring it in output. Most knowledge workers aren’t paid by the hour. They’re paid a flat salary because their employers aren’t buying the ideas they have from 9-to-5; they’re buying the ideas they have in the shower, during lunch, and before getting out of bed.

The 5% profit-sharing we began offering at the same time we shortened the workday was mean to help my team shift to a production mind-set. This way, employees are rewarded for how productive they are, not how long they're on the clock.

3. Nix the "always available" attitude. One of my biggest reservations about a five-hour workday was reducing our customer service department’s hours. I worried that if we cut our open hours in half, we’d lose half our business. But we weren't running a convenience store, after all; our customers bought new paddle boards maybe once every five years. It didn’t matter when we were open as long as our customers knew our hours. And the same proved true with our phones. We still get roughly the same number of calls each day, just at a faster clip. And many of those would-be callers now "self-serve" themselves through our website.

The five-hour workday exposed weaknesses that had been hidden by hourly work. 
4. Use technology to boost efficiency. The five-hour workday exposed weaknesses that had been hidden by hourly work. To allow our warehouse and customer service employees to work 30% less (without growing our staff), we had to creatively figure out how to serve the same number of customers in less time. The obvious solution was automation. In the warehouse, we reduced our packing and shipping time using software. In customer service, we overhauled our FAQ page and created video tutorials to help customers help themselves.

Once you put a time constraint on work, it forces you to consider how you can get technology to do the heavy lifting so your output doesn't suffer. We learned that even in our instant-gratification society, being available all day isn’t necessary. You just need to communicate when and how you're available.

5. Don’t restrict yourself to a 25-hour week. My employees know they can always walk out of the office guilt-free at 1 p.m., and most do most of the time. But it isn't forbidden for the occasional high performer to still put in a 12-hour day when it's really crucial. The key is that those crunch periods remain the exception to the rule—which you need to hold up in spirit, not enforce to the letter.

Moving my staff to a five-hour workday was one of the hardest decisions I've ever made, but today my employees are happier, more productive, and better invested in the business. I've since had incredibly high-performers at local companies send us resumes completely unsolicited. We've been able to recruit extremely talented people away from jobs where they were making six-figure salaries to come work at Tower for much less.

Someday, when we're a bigger company, we'll be able to start people at $80,000 to $100,000—and still let them walk out the door at 1 p.m. When that day comes, we'll be snatching all the best talent from every company in town. That's what I'm betting, anyway—after all, this experiment is only a year old, and it doesn't stop here.

Stephan Aarstol is the author of The Five-Hour Workday: Live Differently, Unlock Productivity, and Find Happiness. He is CEO and founder of Tower, a holistic beach-lifestyle company, which includes Tower Paddle Boards, Tower[/] Magazine, SunglassesByTower.com, and a direct-to-consumer surf-and beach-lifestyle company at TowerMade.com.[/i]
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Is There a Better Way to Sleep?

Is There a Better Way to Sleep? | General Issues | Scoop.it
The notion that eight hours of uninterrupted sleep is our “natural” and healthy cycle has been questioned by research—and our ancestors slept nightly in two separate periods.
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