Geek Therapy
10.8K views | +0 today
Follow
Geek Therapy
How Geek Culture is saving the world. Can geeky, nerdy, and techy things help heal the world? Absolutely. | For the Geek Therapy Podcast and more, visit http://www.geektherapy.com.
Curated by Josué Cardona
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

A Game to Help Doctors Ask Tough Questions

A Game to Help Doctors Ask Tough Questions | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
The game, which is in its final phase of testing, is aimed at primary care and family doctors, who often feel uncomfortable and unqualified assessing their patients in this regard.

 

“This isn’t something medical students have traditionally been trained for,” Dr. Fleming said. “These are hard conversations to have.”

 

The game encourages doctors to adopt a more collaborative and less accusatory approach with patients, Dr. Olsen said. “The goal is to build rapport,” he said.

 

The video game was designed based on research by Dr. Michael F. Fleming at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and draws on technology used by the F.B.I. to train agents in interrogation tactics. It teaches doctors to look for warning signs of drug abuse, like a history of family problems, and to observe nonverbal signs of nervousness, like breaking eye contact, fidgeting and finger-tapping.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Kouply: This mobile game might just save your marriage

Kouply: This mobile game might just save your marriage | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

This free app for iPhone, Windows Phone and the web turns your relationship into a game — letting you and your significant other award points to each other as positive reinforcement for those seriously sweet gestures.

 

Kouply is a moonlight project from two Seattle-area software engineers and a designer — three guys looking to make at least a tiny dent in the divorce rate by encouraging behavior that has a positive effect on relationships.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Books for Troops: Comics best medicine for troops

Books for Troops: Comics best medicine for troops | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Empowered by her experience, Keegan wanted to share her "medicine for the mind" with U.S. military service members abroad.

In 2010, she founded the nonprofit Books for Troops, which has collected and mailed many thousands of paperbacks and magazines to service members serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. Keegan formed the program in her garage. It's based on a simple premise: reading material can help ease the loneliness, stress and fear that some service members feel while under duress.

 

Lt. Bob Smith, a combat medic from New Orleans, told Keegan the comics helped distract him from the problems in Afghanistan and made him think of his childhood and home.

"The collection of comics is just what the doctor ordered," Smith wrote. "If you are able to send more like that, just know my team would be anxious to receive as much as you can send."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Videogames can encourage good behavior in youth

Videogames can encourage good behavior in youth | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

New studies by Iowa State University psychology researchers have found further evidence that youth who play prosocial video games -- games in which characters help others in nonviolent ways — can increase helpful and decrease hurtful behavior.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Leveraging mobile technology for health benefits

Leveraging mobile technology for health benefits | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

Healthcare professionals all over the country are discovering the value of mobile technology as a means to improve patient care, physician coordinators and remote patient monitoring. In a recent paper, Margaret Morris, clinical psychologist and senior researcher at Intel, discussed guidelines healthcare providers can use to motivate healthy behaviors using mobile applications and devices.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

New Emerging Field of Video Game Psychology

Psychology is taking video games into a whole new direction and along with positive reinforcements, behavioral modification, affection, and engaging simulations, video games are changing the way we play games. This new area of social science is being referred to as Video Game Psychology; a new and emerging mix that takes what used to be solely for entertainment purposes and into a life-altering and rehabilitating phenomenon. We will take a look at research in this new and emerging field and witness the impact and its future possibilities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Tetris Shown to Lessen PTSD and Flashbacks

Tetris Shown to Lessen PTSD and Flashbacks | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
The visual-spatial demands of playing Tetris disrupt the formation of the mental imagery involved in flashbacks...

 

Researchers are now corroborating what some trauma sufferers have happened upon by chance: Focusing on a highly engaging visual-spatial task, such as playing video games, may significantly reduce the occurrence of flashbacks, the mental images concerning the trauma that intrude on the sufferer afterward.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Hospital specialist plays for childrens' health

Hospital specialist plays for childrens' health | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

For 2 1/2 years, Newman has been working at the Alberta Children’s Hospital as a Child Life Specialist in oncology, an expert in child development who tries to make life as normal as possible for kids going through cancer treatments.

 

With a background in psychology and teaching, she does that through play, but the video games or colouring books are not just any kind of play — it’s a way to connect with them and figure out their needs, fears and anxieties.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

How Kinect Cameras Are Being Used to Help Detect Autism in Children

How Kinect Cameras Are Being Used to Help Detect Autism in Children | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
In an instance of Kinect being used for more than just video games, researchers are exploring how it might help detect autism in kids.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Education and Gaming [Infographic] | The Wired Homeschool

Educational games have been around for years. Since 1971 when The Oregon Trail was created, the complexity and depth of educational games has evolved.

 

This infographic shows that evolution from the 80′s boom to the massive, multi-player online games of today.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Video Games and Learning [Infographic]

Video Games and Learning [Infographic] | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

Can playing video games really help your children?

 

Apparently, they’re good for our kids (and us too)! For example, kids who played Tetris for 30 a day had a thicker cortex, the part of the brain that is believed to be used for coordination and process visual information.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

A Video Game Where Players Help Real Doctors Diagnose Malaria

A Video Game Where Players Help Real Doctors Diagnose Malaria | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
How harnessing the power of crowds is leading to major medical breakthroughs...

 

Video game players may soon become the latest line of defense against malaria. University of California researchers have developed a free, Internet-based pattern recognition game based on images of real life blood cells. Researchers hope the online tool will cut down the amount of time it now takes to distinguish infected red blood cells from healthy ones.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Kids with cerebral palsy may benefit from video game play

A group of scientists has found that video games such as Nintendo's Wii offer an enjoyable opportunity to promote light to moderate physical activity in children with CP, and may have a role to play in rehabilitation therapy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Role of Video Games in Improving Health-Related Outcomes

Role of Video Games in Improving Health-Related Outcomes | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

Certain video games may be useful tools for psychological and physical therapy, according to University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers who reviewed randomized controlled trials that tested the ability of video games to improve or promote health outcomes. 

 

In the 38 studies identified, the researchers examined a total of 190 health outcomes and found that video games improved 69 percent of psychological therapy outcomes, 59 percent of physical therapy outcomes, 50 percent of physical activity outcomes, 46 percent of clinician skills outcomes, 42 percent of health education outcomes, 42 percent of pain distraction outcomes and 37 percent of disease self-management outcomes.

 

A video describing the study is posted at http://www.scivee.tv/node/48059.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

On Campus: Researchers make compassion a game

How do you teach middle-schoolers about compassion? Create a video game about it, of course.

 

That's the thinking, anyway, behind a new study at UW-Madison.

 

With a $1.39 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, UW-Madison researchers will develop and test two educational games to help eighth-graders develop empathy, cooperation, mental focus and self-regulation.

 

"By the time they reach the eighth grade, virtually every middle-class child in the Western world is playing smartphone apps, video games, computer games," said Davidson in a UW-Madison news release.

 

The hope is to use the media for "constructive purposes" and eventually to reach wide audiences, he said.

 

The first game will focus on attention; the second will stress social behaviors such as kindness and altruism.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Researcher is using video games — controlled by clicks of the teeth to trigger hand movements — to help paralyzed patients.

Researcher is using video games — controlled by clicks of the teeth to trigger hand movements — to help paralyzed patients. | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

In a Vancouver experiment over the past year and a half, seven paralyzed patients played computer games at home while electrodes in a wrist cuff sent electrical currents to paralyzed muscles so they could contract, allowing users to grasp and move a joystick.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Virtual Reality Game Eases Pain for Burn Patients

Virtual Reality Game Eases Pain for Burn Patients | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
For patients, sitting still while medical professionals clean wounds and change bandages can prove nothing less than challenging. A growing number of hospitals have a cool solution: treat the entire process more like a game.

 

For example, about a year ago, Lehigh Valley Health Network in Pennsylvania began using a video game called SnowWorld to help burn patients manage their pain.

 

Brosious says that playing the game reduces pain levels and results in a diminished need for pain and anti-anxiety medication. In fact, a study appearing in the American Pain Society’s APS Bulletin found that virtual reality games reduce patient pain ratings during severe burn wound care by 30 to 50 percent. The game works for two reasons, Brosious says: It creates a “diversion” from watching the burn treatment while allowing patients to focus on a cool environment that feels soothing. SnowWorld is particularly effective for children, who often flinch and cry before treatment begins.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Computer Game That Helps Rehabilitate Stroke Victims

Computer Game That Helps Rehabilitate Stroke Victims | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
A computer game which improves and overcomes the physical symptoms of a stroke using circus tricks has been launched as an innovative way of helping people overcome a stroke.

 

After a stroke, a patient can recover control of the weak arm or hand even after a long time but this requires many months of expert, daily therapy. Providing the support and motivation to enable people to carry out such a demanding programme is costly and difficult and this often limits recovery. This is where the newly-developed suite of computer games called “Circus Challenge” can make a real difference.

 

This is the first game designed as a therapy to be played at home while still being fun, Newcastle University said. "With our video game, people get engrossed in the competition and action of the circus characters and forget that the purpose of the game is for therapy."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

'SPARX': the game that treats depression

'SPARX': the game that treats depression | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Every year thousands of teenagers suffering from mild to moderate depression don't get the help they need for any of a number of reasons: lack of services and support, isolation from mental health services, the high cost of treatment, or embarrassment. A video game might change that.

 

Developed by the University of Auckland in partnership with Metia Interactive, SPARX is a fantasy role-playing game designed to teach young people suffering from depression ways they can manage and overcome their condition. The game was proven successful in trials and the results have been published in the British Medical Journal last month.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Canadian military to test PTSD video therapy

Canadian military to test PTSD video therapy | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
CBC News has learned that the Canadian military has decided to use "virtual reality therapy" in a pilot project to treat post-traumatic stress disorder.

 

The new therapy method puts soldiers in a computer-animated situation that recreates the specific incident that left the soldiers traumatized. A therapist then helps the soldiers to work through their memories.

 

It is estimated that 17 per cent of Canadian soldiers who did dangerous patrols outside of their base in Afghanistan, and who are now home, are reporting symptoms of PTSD.

 

Dr. Rakesh Jetley says virtual reality therapy is a new and promising tool in the treatment of PTSD. 


The Canadian Forces says the therapy seems to appeal to a younger generation of soldiers comfortable with video games.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Virtual Therapists: The army's new weapon in the war against depression

Virtual Therapists: The army's new weapon in the war against depression | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
The mental health of our fighting men and women is a top concern, but the army's newest tool to help diagnose conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression is quite curious indeed. Meet SIM Sensei, the virtual therapist for soldiers.

 

How does the new therapy system work? A soldier in need of assistance can walk into a clinic without an appointment, enter a private computer booth, and sign on to the SIM Sensei system. That soldier can then talk to a 3D rendering of a human being for guidance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

What are therapy apps?

What are therapy apps? | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

A group of scientists are now planning to develop an app for smartphones that allows users instant access to psychological therapy on the go. They have been testing simple programs that follow the video game format to see if the process would really work in relieving people of common anxiety and depression. Since the results were encouraging, they now want to develop those same programs into sophisticated apps for Android users.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Psychology Study: For Enjoyment, Slow Down

People rush through experiences not necessarily because they lack self-control but because they simply don’t realize that slowing down consumption leads to more pleasure, a study finds.

 

The researchers proved this hypothesis using several different stimuli, including Hershey’s Kisses and video games.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

The psychology of superheroes

The psychology of superheroes | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Psychologist Robin Rosenberg has extensively studied psychological phenomena revealed by superheroes and has written and edited several books about superhero psychology, including the upcoming Superhero Origins: What Makes Superheroes Tick and Why We Care. She says superheroes are often admired, not just for their power, but because they can offer a moral example to live by.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Josué Cardona
Scoop.it!

Video-game exercise may boost workout routine, survey says

Often derided for contributing to the obesity epidemic, video games may actually be part of the solution, particularly if they promote exercise, according to a survey released Thursday.

 

Three out of four adults said video games should encourage physical activity, and 70 percent believe the games can complement traditional exercise, according to the survey funded by UnitedHealth Group.

more...
No comment yet.