Geek Therapy
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Geek Therapy
How Geek Culture is saving the world. Can geeky, nerdy, and techy things help heal the world? Absolutely. | For the Geek Therapy Podcast and more, visit http://www.geektherapy.com.
Curated by Josué Cardona
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How A Game Helps Disadvantaged Women and Children Around the World

How A Game Helps Disadvantaged Women and Children Around the World | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

Half the Sky Movement is a transmedia initiative that was created to shed light on the struggles of mothers, young girls and their families in countries like Cambodia, Kenya, India, Sierra Leone, and Afghanistan.

 

What makes this initiative so appealing and powerful is how it combines different forms of media to share stories, raise awareness, and find solutions to a host of serious gender-based injustices.

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Game Could Improve ADHD Diagnoses and Treatment

Game Could Improve ADHD Diagnoses and Treatment | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

CogCubed was founded by a husband-and-wife team: game developer Kurt Roots and child psychiatrist Monika Heller. Their goal is to use sensor technology to produce objective data about symptoms that are often hard to pin down, such as inattentiveness and hyperactivity.

Josué Cardona's insight:

If you have ever taken or seen ADHD testing, this should make a lot of sense.

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'Auti-Sim' Game Simulates Life With Childhood Autism

'Auti-Sim' Game Simulates Life With Childhood Autism | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
A new game called Auti-Sim simulates childhood experience with autism and aims to raise awareness of the challenges of hypersensitivity disorder.
Josué Cardona's insight:

This really is more of a simulation than a game but if it provides any resemblence to the actual experience, it could be a great tool in helping parents understand their children.

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Game-Like Therapy Helps Kids with ADHD Without Drugs

Game-Like Therapy Helps Kids with ADHD Without Drugs | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
It looks like a noisy video game, but it’s actually a new ADHD therapy that is helping 11-year-old Adam Solomon train his brain.

 

Adam was in danger of having to go on ADHD (Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) medication. His family didn’t want that to happen, but his mother Diane Solomon said Adam’s condition was going from bad to worse.

 

Desperate, they tried something different: an innovative treatment from Camarillo-based Hardy Brain Training called Interactive Metronome.

 

The program tries to improve that brain timing and rhythm through a computer program. Patients hear a tone and have to clap their hands or tap their foot to match the beat. The screen gives instant feedback on how well they are keeping up. As their coordination improves, so does their concentration.

 

Adam’s parents say he showed a remarkable difference after he trained on the program for a summer, and they were able to streamline him into a regular classroom for the first time in his life.

After a few more years of training, he tested into the gifted program at Johns Hopkins University.

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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
Video games used as medical treatment
Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
Video games used as medical treatment
Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
Video games used as medical treatment
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Middle School Student Wins National Contest Promoting Eating Right in Video Game

Middle School Student Wins National Contest Promoting Eating Right in Video Game | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

A fan of video games, the 14-year-old decided to take the project seriously and spent several hours over two weeks at school and home to come up with the game’s components. 

 

Brightly said he enjoys video games with heroes saving the world. Those games inspired his storyline of “Vege-Wars,” in which a middle school student is recruited to fight a war against “fast foodies” — unhealthy fast foods — and teach others about better eating options.


“It’s supposed to teach about how you should become active and healthy. Eating fast food is not something to do, because it just makes you more unhealthy,” Brightly said.

 

The Henry Middle School student won the best overall, or “Bestivore,” award out of nearly 400 entries from 42 schools across the country for his game.

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Kouply: This mobile game might just save your marriage

Kouply: This mobile game might just save your marriage | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

This free app for iPhone, Windows Phone and the web turns your relationship into a game — letting you and your significant other award points to each other as positive reinforcement for those seriously sweet gestures.

 

Kouply is a moonlight project from two Seattle-area software engineers and a designer — three guys looking to make at least a tiny dent in the divorce rate by encouraging behavior that has a positive effect on relationships.

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Students create video game for kids with cystic fibrosis

Students create video game for kids with cystic fibrosis | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

Three engineering students have invented a video game for kids with cystic fibrosis designed "to make daily breathing therapy, known as positive expiratory pressure (PEP), more fun."

 

 

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Jacqueline Panvini De Rubin's curator insight, December 14, 2013 7:16 PM

Fisioterapia respiratoria como juego de niños, útil y divertido

Richard Platt's curator insight, January 11, 2014 10:29 AM

Cool, and this was developed by engineering students helping other kids.  Awesome use case

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Virtual Game Helps the Blind Navigate New Environments

Virtual Game Helps the Blind Navigate New Environments | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

Researchers in the Department of Ophthalmology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School developed a virtual game to help the blind find their way through new surroundings using computer generated layouts of public buildings.

 

Participants can interact with the virtual environment with a keyboard and rather than relying on visual cues, the game uses auditory cues to help orient the player. According to a new report, the team of researchers are looking to incorporate other interfaces and tools such as a Wii remote or joystick.

 

Dr. Lotfi Merabet, a contributor to the study, says the game metaphor allows for open discoveryand a better understanding of layouts compared to participants simply following directions.

Josué Cardona's insight:

By adding gaming elements, the researchers found it more effective than simply making an empty virtual map. 

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iPad game hopes to stop HIV transmission

iPad game hopes to stop HIV transmission | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Play a sedentary video game and live a healthier life? That’s the hope of Yale researchers who are joining the booming health games industry with an iPad application designed to help minority teens learn about HIV prevention strategies.

 

As part of Yale’s Play2Prevent initiative, a group from the School of Medicine conducted focus groups with New Haven teens to gain an understanding common factors and behaviors that affect HIV risk. The findings are guiding the design and content of a new iPad game titled PlayForward: Elm City Stories, which aims to promote better decisions among minority youth. The researchers will conduct a study on the game’s impact HIV transmission rates starting later this year.

 

“The overall goal is to help kids practice skills in the game that will decrease their engagement in behaviors that put them at risk for HIV,” said brief author Lynn Fiellin MED ’96, associate professor of medicine and director of Play2Prevent. “The idea is to build an evidence-based HIV intervention. The game has to be fun and engaging, but it has to accomplish something.”

 

The game involves creating an avatar who goes through a virtual life and makes decisions revolving around risk behaviors, including unprotected sex and drug and alcohol abuse. The player will be able to see how their choices and actions influence later situations and rewind to play out how making another decision could produce a different outcome. Researchers will study the impact of the game among New Haven teens in an 18-24 month clinical trial starting later this year.

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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
"Brainwashing" kids to make better choices
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"Kiddio" App May Help Parents Get Kids to Eat More Vegetables

"Kiddio" App May Help Parents Get Kids to Eat More Vegetables | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

When complete, "Kiddio: Food Fight!" will give parents of preschoolers a fun, interactive way to learn some of the best approaches for getting their kids to eat more vegetables, according to Tom Baranowski, who leads the team that is developing the app.

 

The videogame project, funded by the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, will draw upon five studies that the Houston scientists have conducted over the past decade. These studies, involving thousands of parents, kids, and nutrition-related professionals, are examples of what has become known as "behavioral nutrition," a comparatively new scientific discipline that has roots in both psychology and nutrition.

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A Game to Help Doctors Ask Tough Questions

A Game to Help Doctors Ask Tough Questions | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
The game, which is in its final phase of testing, is aimed at primary care and family doctors, who often feel uncomfortable and unqualified assessing their patients in this regard.

 

“This isn’t something medical students have traditionally been trained for,” Dr. Fleming said. “These are hard conversations to have.”

 

The game encourages doctors to adopt a more collaborative and less accusatory approach with patients, Dr. Olsen said. “The goal is to build rapport,” he said.

 

The video game was designed based on research by Dr. Michael F. Fleming at the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and draws on technology used by the F.B.I. to train agents in interrogation tactics. It teaches doctors to look for warning signs of drug abuse, like a history of family problems, and to observe nonverbal signs of nervousness, like breaking eye contact, fidgeting and finger-tapping.

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