Geek Therapy
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Geek Therapy
How Geek Culture is saving the world. Can geeky, nerdy, and techy things help heal the world? Absolutely. | For the Geek Therapy Podcast and more, visit http://www.geektherapy.com.
Curated by Josué Cardona
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"Kiddio" App May Help Parents Get Kids to Eat More Vegetables

"Kiddio" App May Help Parents Get Kids to Eat More Vegetables | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

When complete, "Kiddio: Food Fight!" will give parents of preschoolers a fun, interactive way to learn some of the best approaches for getting their kids to eat more vegetables, according to Tom Baranowski, who leads the team that is developing the app.

 

The videogame project, funded by the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, will draw upon five studies that the Houston scientists have conducted over the past decade. These studies, involving thousands of parents, kids, and nutrition-related professionals, are examples of what has become known as "behavioral nutrition," a comparatively new scientific discipline that has roots in both psychology and nutrition.

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Middle School Student Wins National Contest Promoting Eating Right in Video Game

Middle School Student Wins National Contest Promoting Eating Right in Video Game | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

A fan of video games, the 14-year-old decided to take the project seriously and spent several hours over two weeks at school and home to come up with the game’s components. 

 

Brightly said he enjoys video games with heroes saving the world. Those games inspired his storyline of “Vege-Wars,” in which a middle school student is recruited to fight a war against “fast foodies” — unhealthy fast foods — and teach others about better eating options.


“It’s supposed to teach about how you should become active and healthy. Eating fast food is not something to do, because it just makes you more unhealthy,” Brightly said.

 

The Henry Middle School student won the best overall, or “Bestivore,” award out of nearly 400 entries from 42 schools across the country for his game.

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The Perfected Self: Behavioral Technology and the unlikely comeback of B.F. Skinner's Ideas

The Perfected Self: Behavioral Technology and the unlikely comeback of B.F. Skinner's Ideas | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

Behavioral technology allows users to gradually and permanently alter all kinds of behavior, from reducing their energy use to controlling their spending. Now, with the help of our iPhones and a few Facebook friends, we can train ourselves to lead healthier, safer, eco-friendlier, more financially secure, and more productive lives.

 

Ironically, this high-tech behavioral revolution is rooted in the work of a mid-century psychologist once maligned as morally bankrupt, even fascist. But the rise of social media has reoriented our societal paranoias, and more and more people are incorporating his theories into their daily lives. As a result, psychology’s most misunderstood visionary may finally get his due.

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Study finds asking kids 'What would Batman eat?' improves their food choices

Study finds asking kids 'What would Batman eat?' improves their food choices | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

In the ongoing battle to get children to eat healthfully, parents may do well invoking the names of superheroes to come to their rescue, say Cornell researchers.

 

Just as Popeye inspired a generation to eat spinach, such role models as Spiderman or Batman could help children make healthy choices, according to Brian Wansink, the John S. Dyson Professor of Marketing and director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab.

 

Wansink, with postdoctoral researcher Mitsuru Shimizu and visiting graduate student Guido Camps of Utrecht University in the Netherlands, conducted a study in which 22 children, ages 6-12, at a summer camp were asked if they wanted "apple fries" (thinly sliced raw apples) or French fries during several consecutive Wednesday lunches.

 

During one of those lunches, the children were first presented with 12 photos of real and fictional role models and asked, "Would this person order apple fries or French fries?"

Josué Cardona's insight:

The oringal link seems to have changed. You can find the article at: http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2012/05/considering-what-batman-would-eat-helps-kids-diets

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Company uses technology to help with weight loss

Company uses technology to help with weight loss | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Jeff Hyman of Deerfield created Retrofit, a customized weight loss program that uses Skype and other technology to encourage people to develop new behaviors over time.

 

Retrofit assigns all clients a dietician, an exercise physiologist and a behavior therapist that all help the client work toward a realistic goal. The 65 weight loss experts, who are scattered around the country, meet with clients via Skype every week for ongoing consultation.

 

As part of Retrofit’s program, clients are provided with a wireless activity tracker that tracks steps taken, calories burned, sleep patterns and other factors involved in weight loss. Clients are also provided with a Wi-Fi scale with similar software ability. The weight loss expert can track a client’s progress through the software.

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