Geek Therapy
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Geek Therapy
How Geek Culture is saving the world. Can geeky, nerdy, and techy things help heal the world? Absolutely. | For the Geek Therapy Podcast and more, visit http://www.geektherapy.com.
Curated by Josué Cardona
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Patient becomes a comic book hero to help other kids with PID

Patient becomes a comic book hero to help other kids with PID | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

The book, based on the real-life experiences, concerns and questions of 11-year-old Tom Croall, was written and peer reviewed by doctors and leading patient and professional organisations to help young people understand primary immunodeficiency and the impact that the condition may have upon their lives.

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Graphic novels about the Civil Rights movement

Graphic novels about the Civil Rights movement | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr., Day... a couple of links relating to graphic novels about the Civil Rights movement.

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Melissa Jenkins 's curator insight, February 15, 2014 10:16 AM

Interesting approach to learning 

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Navy Doc and Combat Psychologist Write Graphic Novel For Corpsmen

Navy Doc and Combat Psychologist Write Graphic Novel For Corpsmen | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

As San Diego's Naval Health Research Center chief scientist for behavioral health in the Behavioral Science and Epidemiology Department, Dr. Jerry Larson realized that warrior is an increasingly common role for corpsmen, and saw the need to deliver information that would help psychologically prepare corpsmen for the stress of active combat.

 

But how best to deliver this information to corpsmen? After some thought, he concluded it could best be done by the the modern storytelling method of a graphic novel. Graphic novels, which are so popular these days among young adults but have not been utilized to date by the military, tell stories with art in a traditional comic format, but have a 'beginning, middle, and end' like traditional novels. Larson says he chose this format specifically for its appeal to the targeted age group and its value in providing thought-provoking content for discussion in training scenarios.

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Shadow Quill 's curator insight, July 31, 2013 2:20 AM

Wonderful use of graphic novels to help the military

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Neurocomic takes readers on an adventure in the brain – video

"Artist Matteo Farinella and neuroscientist Hana Ros of University College London collaborated to create a graphic novel called Neurocomic about a hapless character who is sucked into a human brain where he encounters bizarre creatures and famous neuroscientists. The objective is to introduce the neurochemical workings of the brain to a wider audience, so entertainment, storytelling and clever metaphors are just as important to the enterprise as the science"

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Comic books have something to teach future doctors

Comic books have something to teach future doctors | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of Toronto are using graphic novels in medical classrooms to teach future doctors about humanizing illness.

 

In addition to the stalwart Manual of Clinical Oncology, medical students may soon see the comic book Cancer Vixen: A True Story on their required reading list.

 

Researchers are using graphic novels as a teaching tool to communicate the ethical and emotional complexities of illness, disease and trauma to medical students.

 

With their self-effacing protagonists and cutting black humour, graphic novels often capture the reality of being sick, or knowing a loved one who is, better than dry textbooks and earnest self-help memoirs.

 

“Cartoons and comics were dismissed as a trivial medium, but we realize now they are extremely sophisticated,” says Allan Peterkin, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Toronto. “It’s about that interplay between the words and the text. You’re using different parts of the brain to read carefully, just as you’re doing to diagnose in the clinic.”

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Medical Comics are the basis for future learning

Medical Comics are the basis for future learning | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

The Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation of America and the Children’s Hospital in Boston have each produced comicbooks targeted for young children who suffer from ailments that adversely affect their lives, but which the child might not be able to understand when presented in a “typical” fashion. These two comic books Pete learns all about Crohn’s and Colitis and Amy Goes Gluten-Free A young person’s Guide to Geliag Disease. Each of these comics deals with their specific issues in a fashion that is easily understood and digestible for younger readers. Both comics are written by Hilarie Staton and illustrated by Joe Staton, and both combine both traditional comicbook storytelling as well as through text, checklists, crossword puzzles and other kid-friendly methods.

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The psychology of superheroes

The psychology of superheroes | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Psychologist Robin Rosenberg has extensively studied psychological phenomena revealed by superheroes and has written and edited several books about superhero psychology, including the upcoming Superhero Origins: What Makes Superheroes Tick and Why We Care. She says superheroes are often admired, not just for their power, but because they can offer a moral example to live by.
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Psychologist Uses Superhero Comics to Treat His Patients

Psychologist Uses Superhero Comics to Treat His Patients | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

Dr. O'Connor practices at Southeast Psych in Charlotte, NC, where he's developed an unusual way to address his patients' needs. O'Connor sometimes asks patients to read and discuss comic books to help patients verbalize and process their own decisions and emotions.

 

... O'Connor says that while he uses his comic therapy primarily with adolescents, it's also helped people in their 30s and 40s deal with everything from social anxiety to mood disorders. And, while his patients want to read more Marvel comics, he finds DC works best for therapy...

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Psychiatrists Call Out DC Comics on Depictions of Mentally Ill

Psychiatrists Call Out DC Comics on Depictions of Mentally Ill | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

"DC is not alone in using depictions that don't serve the mentally ill well," Bender told Newsarama. "But what we're finding is that, when they portray a character as being violent, and as being psychopathic, and the depiction uses language that refers to that person as mentally ill, there tends to be this link that's reinforced, this idea that those with mental illness are violent. Or that mental illness is causing this violent behavior, or this abhorrent thinking. And that's not the case."

 

Kambam said the problem is that the terms being used by comic creators to describe their villains — like "psychotic" and "schizophrenic" — are actual medical terms in the real world. "You're trying to explain a character's villainy or extreme violence by using a real-life illness, that people in the real world have, that are very common. That's when it's harmful to people in real life," Kambam said.

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Will the Female Superheroes Please Step Forward?

Will the Female Superheroes Please Step Forward? | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

"What would fictional worlds look like if the women were just as likely to get super powers as men? And what if there really are a lot more women in these fictional worlds but they aren't speaking up? What if they all stepped forward? "

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sachin dixit's comment, February 19, 2014 12:44 AM
This is true man , i have never seen a famous female superhero in my life.
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Cardiff University comic book project helps African youngsters deal with misery of AIDs

Cardiff University comic book project helps African youngsters deal with misery of AIDs | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Language experts use graphics to demolish myths associated with continent's biggest killer
Josué Cardona's insight:

This project has two parts: It gave children a way to share their experiences and express their feelings about AIDs and it culminated in a book for broad distribution.

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Shadow Quill 's curator insight, July 31, 2013 11:09 PM

What a wonderful way to apply comic books to allow the kids to express themselves about AIDS

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Asian comics creators using the medium for social and gender justice

Asian comics creators using the medium for social and gender justice | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

"This is pretty interesting video from Sharad Sharma – a growing network of mostly female creators who are utilising the comics medium and comics workshops to empower women and address social issues pertaining to gender in their part of the world, and also build on those strips to use them for other social commentary and discussion (such as creating comics addressing widespread issues of official corruption)."

Josué Cardona's insight:

This really is an amazing video about the power of the comics medium in parts of the world most people probably do not associate with comics. 

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Young aboriginal mothers learn pregnancy health through comic book art

Young aboriginal mothers learn pregnancy health through comic book art | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

Working to reach indigenous Aboriginal youth, as well as other Canadian youth, through comic book literature, the Canadian based Healthy Aboriginal Network is reaching the public with the launch of their latest new comic book, “It Takes a Village,” which outlines how young Canadian indigenous women can keep good health practices and habits during their maternity.


“The Healthy Aboriginal Network is a non-profit organization that creates comic books on health and social issues for youth. We’ve enjoyed a great deal of community support by telling relatable stories, which we’ve ensured by using First Nation writers and Indigenous illustrators,” outlines Healthy Aboriginal Network Director Sean Muir.


With a style that can help both male and female teens who often face decisions in life that can help or hurt them, the latest published comic honors Aboriginal tradition as it shares maternal and child health knowledge through best diet throughout pregnancy along with a safe respect of health and traditional medicines.

 

Topics covered in Healthy Aboriginal Network comic books include positive ways for Aboriginal youth to deal with peer pressure, sex and sexual health, gang violence, suicide prevention, drugs and alcohol use, pregnancy health and life for young mothers, stay-in-school importance, as well as respecting elders and yourself. Honoring Aboriginal traditional history and ways is also highlighted. 

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Study finds asking kids 'What would Batman eat?' improves their food choices

Study finds asking kids 'What would Batman eat?' improves their food choices | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

In the ongoing battle to get children to eat healthfully, parents may do well invoking the names of superheroes to come to their rescue, say Cornell researchers.

 

Just as Popeye inspired a generation to eat spinach, such role models as Spiderman or Batman could help children make healthy choices, according to Brian Wansink, the John S. Dyson Professor of Marketing and director of the Cornell Food and Brand Lab.

 

Wansink, with postdoctoral researcher Mitsuru Shimizu and visiting graduate student Guido Camps of Utrecht University in the Netherlands, conducted a study in which 22 children, ages 6-12, at a summer camp were asked if they wanted "apple fries" (thinly sliced raw apples) or French fries during several consecutive Wednesday lunches.

 

During one of those lunches, the children were first presented with 12 photos of real and fictional role models and asked, "Would this person order apple fries or French fries?"

Josué Cardona's insight:

The oringal link seems to have changed. You can find the article at: http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2012/05/considering-what-batman-would-eat-helps-kids-diets

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Books for Troops: Comics best medicine for troops

Books for Troops: Comics best medicine for troops | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Empowered by her experience, Keegan wanted to share her "medicine for the mind" with U.S. military service members abroad.

In 2010, she founded the nonprofit Books for Troops, which has collected and mailed many thousands of paperbacks and magazines to service members serving in Iraq and Afghanistan. Keegan formed the program in her garage. It's based on a simple premise: reading material can help ease the loneliness, stress and fear that some service members feel while under duress.

 

Lt. Bob Smith, a combat medic from New Orleans, told Keegan the comics helped distract him from the problems in Afghanistan and made him think of his childhood and home.

"The collection of comics is just what the doctor ordered," Smith wrote. "If you are able to send more like that, just know my team would be anxious to receive as much as you can send."

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Media Lab Uses Videos, Comics, and More to Help People Understand Health Issues

Media Lab Uses Videos, Comics, and More to Help People Understand Health Issues | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

People facing medical decisions often look beyond their physicians to media such as websites, social networks, video, and mobile apps. Unfortunately, much of the health information these people find does not succeed in getting the information across or lead to healthy change.

 

The Health Design Laboratory is based at St Michael's Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, which was completed in 2011 and seeks to link patient care with education and research and to promote the ethical generation and use of knowledge. The laboratory was conceived as one approach to help the institute bring reliable medical information to patients quickly and effectively.

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Exploring the Pain of Depression in Webcomics

Exploring the Pain of Depression in Webcomics | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

But what makes Depression Comix and Hyperbole and a Half different is that they bring the reader up close to the depressed mind and shout, "Hey! This is what it's like in here!" They've put words and pictures behind something that is incredibly difficult to articulate. For folks who have suffered from depression or are currently suffering from depression, the benefit is twofold. First, there is the ever-important sense of kinship, the realization that someone else understands the very thing that you are going through and that you aren't completely alone.

 

On top of that, these comics can help non-depressed folks who may understand depression at an intellectual level understand it at an emotional one as well. After all, it's easy enough to talk about neurotransmitters and decreased serotonin; it's far more difficult to get at the meat of what makes depression so devastating.

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