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Geek Therapy
How Geek Culture is saving the world. Can geeky, nerdy, and techy things help heal the world? Absolutely. | For the Geek Therapy Podcast and more, visit http://www.geektherapy.com.
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Goggles help surgeons ‘see’ tumours

Goggles help surgeons ‘see’ tumours | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

The newly developed goggles allow surgeons to 'see' the cancer cells they need to remove.

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Teenage cancer survivor creates social gaming network for young people in treatment

Teenage cancer survivor creates social gaming network for young people in treatment | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

"A teenage cancer survivor has started a non-profit organization aiming to help children and teenagers in treatment connect with other patients through video games...

 

Founder Steven Gonzalez was inspired to start the Survivor Games group due his "love for video games" and experience being treated at MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital in Texas. Gonzalez was diagnosed with a form of leukemia five years ago with a two percent chance of survival. After undergoing chemotherapy and a double cord blood transplant he had to remain in a sterile environment for 100 days. While isolated, Gonzalez would play video games, and during that time built Play Against Cancer, a video game tailored to cancer patients."

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iPhone app helps track skin cancer

iPhone app helps track skin cancer | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
A new iPhone application developed at the University of Michigan Health System helps users monitor changes in their skin over time as a self-screening for cancer.

 

In doctor’s offices, whole-body photography is used to track patients at risk for melanoma.


“However, it requires a professional photographer, is not always covered by insurance, and can be an inconvenience,” said Dr. Michael Sabel, lead physician in the development of the app and an associate professor of surgery at the U-M Medical School.


“Now that many people have digital cameras on their phones, it’s more feasible to do this at home,” Sabel said in a statement.
The app instructs users to take a series of 23 photos of different parts of their body from head to toe. Photos are stored within the app, which then sends out automated reminders to repeat the self-exam on a regular basis.


Should the mole or skin lesion change or grow, the user would then be able to share them with a dermatologist.
The app also includes a function for users to calculate their individual risk of skin cancer.

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High-tech approaches long dreamed of but not possible to fight cancer emerge

High-tech approaches long dreamed of but not possible to fight cancer emerge | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

New research shows a sharp escalation in the weapons race against cancer, with several high-tech approaches long dreamed of but not possible or successful until now.

 

The field continues to move toward more precise treatments with fewer side effects and away from old-style chemotherapy that was “like dropping a bomb on the body,” Dr. Richard Pazdur said.

 

Other doctors, including Pfizer’s cancer drug development chief, Dr. Mace Rothenberg, noted progress on new diagnostic tests to predict which drugs will work for which patients. Cost, time and difficulty have kept many of them from being practical in everyday settings for cancer patients, but “a lot of these barriers are falling,” Rothenberg said.

 

“Every time we say ‘this technology is 5 to 10 years off, we’ve been wrong” and progress has come sooner, he said.

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Video games provide new targets for cancer drugs

Video games provide new targets for cancer drugs | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
Scientists have turned to video games to find the cure for cancer...

 

This has helped him see exactly how the cells live, divide and die, and Cho says, it suggests possibilities for new targets for tumor-killing drugs.

 

“If it wasn’t for gamers who kept buying these GPUs, the prices wouldn’t have dropped, and we couldn’t have used them for science,” said Cho.

 

 

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The healing power of video games

The healing power of video games | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

How video games helped one teenager beat cancer and form his bridge back to normalcy.

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Jessica Marello's curator insight, January 21, 9:17 PM

Videogames are awesome, end of story.

Matija Sprogar's curator insight, March 7, 7:59 PM

Yeah, but just leap into the first multiplayer Mario platformer set in a 3D world! Play as Mario, Luigi, Princess Peach, and Toad—each with their own special skills—in the all-new Sprixie Kingdom. At http://s.shr.lc/19obdCc

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The healing power of video games: Steven Gonzalez at TEDxSugarLand

"After battling a rare and aggressive form of cancer, Steven is living his life to the fullest. Beating the odds of less than 2% chance for survival, Steven will share how his experience has given him a passion to help kids heal through video games."

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New Test Smells Cancer on Your Breath

New Test Smells Cancer on Your Breath | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

First unveiled on June 2 at the annual American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago, this cancer-detecting breathalyzer system, which is still awaiting clinical trials, is able to conduct prescreening for both breast cancer and lung cancer. Developed by scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the cancer breathalyzer could drastically reduce costs for American patients, while enabling expanded screening in countries with inadequate infrastructure and taboos against mammograms.

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Hospital specialist plays for childrens' health

Hospital specialist plays for childrens' health | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

For 2 1/2 years, Newman has been working at the Alberta Children’s Hospital as a Child Life Specialist in oncology, an expert in child development who tries to make life as normal as possible for kids going through cancer treatments.

 

With a background in psychology and teaching, she does that through play, but the video games or colouring books are not just any kind of play — it’s a way to connect with them and figure out their needs, fears and anxieties.

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