Geek Therapy
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Geek Therapy
How Geek Culture is saving the world. Can geeky, nerdy, and techy things help heal the world? Absolutely. | For the Geek Therapy Podcast and more, visit http://www.geektherapy.com.
Curated by Josué Cardona
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Game Could Improve ADHD Diagnoses and Treatment

Game Could Improve ADHD Diagnoses and Treatment | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it

CogCubed was founded by a husband-and-wife team: game developer Kurt Roots and child psychiatrist Monika Heller. Their goal is to use sensor technology to produce objective data about symptoms that are often hard to pin down, such as inattentiveness and hyperactivity.

Josué Cardona's insight:

If you have ever taken or seen ADHD testing, this should make a lot of sense.

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Games to Sharpen the Brain

Games to Sharpen the Brain | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
If two start-ups have their way, videogames might cure more than just boredom. They could also be used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.


Akili Interactive Labs Inc. of Boston, formed by start-up-creating firm PureTech Ventures, and San Francisco company Brain Plasticity Inc. are seeking Food and Drug Administration approval for a videogame treatment they hope clinicians will turn to before prescribing medicines for ADHD.


The disorder, whose symptoms include difficulty paying attention and remaining focused, affects 9% of adolescents and 4.1% of adults in the U.S., according to the American Psychiatric Association.

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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:24 AM
New disease therapy methods for add
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Game-Like Therapy Helps Kids with ADHD Without Drugs

Game-Like Therapy Helps Kids with ADHD Without Drugs | Geek Therapy | Scoop.it
It looks like a noisy video game, but it’s actually a new ADHD therapy that is helping 11-year-old Adam Solomon train his brain.

 

Adam was in danger of having to go on ADHD (Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) medication. His family didn’t want that to happen, but his mother Diane Solomon said Adam’s condition was going from bad to worse.

 

Desperate, they tried something different: an innovative treatment from Camarillo-based Hardy Brain Training called Interactive Metronome.

 

The program tries to improve that brain timing and rhythm through a computer program. Patients hear a tone and have to clap their hands or tap their foot to match the beat. The screen gives instant feedback on how well they are keeping up. As their coordination improves, so does their concentration.

 

Adam’s parents say he showed a remarkable difference after he trained on the program for a summer, and they were able to streamline him into a regular classroom for the first time in his life.

After a few more years of training, he tested into the gifted program at Johns Hopkins University.

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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
Video games used as medical treatment
Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
Video games used as medical treatment
Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
Video games used as medical treatment