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America's fastest shrinking cities

America's fastest shrinking cities | Geography | Scoop.it

"The U.S. population rose by just 0.72% in 2013, the lowest growth rate in more than 70 years. Not only has the country become less-attractive to immigrants than in years past, with net immigration down from nearly 1.2 million as of 2001 to 843,145 last year, but also the U.S.'s domestic birth rate has dropped to a multi-decade low.

While the population of most of the country's metro areas grew at a low pace in recent years, in a small number of metro areas the population actually shrank. Looking at the most recent years, the U.S. population rose by just 2.4% between April 2010 and July 2013, but in 30 metro areas the population shrank by at least 1%. The population in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, fell a nation-leading 4.4% in that time. Based on recently released U.S. Census Bureau estimates, 24/7 Wall St. examined the cities with shrinking populations."


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How the Potato Changed the World

How the Potato Changed the World | Geography | Scoop.it
Brought to Europe from the New World by Spanish explorers, the lowly potato gave rise to modern industrial agriculture

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Gina Panighetti's curator insight, August 4, 2014 5:35 PM

Columbian Exchange Unit

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:57 PM

Potatoes are one of the most widespread foods in the world, due to its resiliency to harsh weather conditions and its ability to grow to large sizes. Potatoes can also be traced to show the beginning forces of globalization. Before modern communication and transportation technology, globalization occurred at a much slower rate. Globalization spread through trade routes in the forms of foods, resources, and therefore cultures and people. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:52 PM

The Colombian Exchange is a term that describes the most dramatic biologic transfer in history.  European explorers brought animals and agricultural items from the Old World to the New and subsequently brought back items from the New World back to the Old.  This exchange profoundly reshaped many societies as agricultural diffusion of the potato lead to the changes across northern Europe. 

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, diffusionhistorical colonialism, Europe

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Geography | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | Geography | Scoop.it

"The breakthrough came in 1996, when a new class of antiretroviral drug called protease inhibitors was launched. These were used in combination with two older drugs that worked in different ways. The combination meant that evolving resistance required the simultaneous appearance of several beneficial (from the virus’s point of view) mutations—which is improbable.  With a viable treatment available, political action became more realistic. AIDS had been a “political” disease from the beginning, because a lot of the early victims were middle-class gay Americans, a group already politically active. Activists were split between those who favoured treating people already infected and those who wanted to stop new infections. The latter were more concerned to preach the message of safe sex and make condoms widely available, so that people could practise what was preached. Gradually, however, activists on both sides realised that the drugs, by almost abolishing the virus from a sufferer’s body, also render him unlikely to pass it on. They are, in other words, a dual-use technology."


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:22 PM

As the article states, the AIDS virus was not known to the science community during the diseases' first years of emergance, but thanks to science, research was put on the forefront to stop AIDS. Unfortunately, the Disease is still incurable, but as the author says, some cases of the virus disappearing from the sufferers' body, it gives hope that a cure may be found someday. The AIDs virus will always be a hot topic and is referred to as the "Political" disease and must pose a threat to rich people in order for the pharmaceutical companies to develop cures.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:52 AM

This article discusses the recent treatments and their success in treating AIDs. For many years AIDs spread rapidly across Africa and even today it still spreads, luckily two things have begun to slow down it's advance. Both the increase in the use of contraception such as condoms which protect against AIDs as well as the production of antibiotics  made available to many at risk of AIDs. This shows that with decent government backing it is possible to stem outbreaks such as this.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:13 PM

In the late 1990s, it is estimated that 15 million of people had died because of AIDS in Africa. As all social classes were  affected by the virus, even political figures, many international organizations and private businesses were integrated into research treatment. However, the main obstacle in combating this disease is that there is not enough money to fund the necessary treatment for people in many African countries. Although, many organizations have embarked on campaigns regarding how to prevent this dreadful disease from spreading further and these efforts have proved successful in the past decade.

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What the Most Violent Nations in the World Have in Common

What the Most Violent Nations in the World Have in Common | Geography | Scoop.it
High rates of intentional violence are strongly associated with inequality, both in terms of class and gender.

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No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence

No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence | Geography | Scoop.it
LONDON – Escalating the fight against secession, the British government warned Thursday that Scotland would lose the right to continue using the pound as its currency if voters there say yes to a historic referendum on independence this fall.

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This chart shows how Chinese became the new French - The Washington Post

This chart shows how Chinese became the new French - The Washington Post | Geography | Scoop.it

Chinese is the new French -- and other key takeaways from Census Bureau data on language in the U.S.


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Adriene Mannas's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:07 PM

This post is mainly focusing on how Chinese has become a much more popular language over the years. By saying that "China is the new French" you are saying that China is over coming French in the spot for most popular language under English and Spanish. It has drastically increased over the years and the French popularity has started to drop and as of 2010 is below Chinese dropping down to fourth rather than third. 

 

This relates to unit three on culture and languages. It is showing which language is the most popular around the world and most know with people.  This can affect both business and future learning of languages.

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The Egyptian Revolution: An Interactive Timeline

The Egyptian Revolution: An Interactive Timeline | Geography | Scoop.it

Objectives for this Teaching with the News:

Students will:

Review a timeline of events in Egypt over the past three years.Identify core themes of Egyptian protest movements.Work collaboratively with classmates.


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Miss America crowns 1st winner of Indian descent

Miss America crowns 1st winner of Indian descent | Geography | Scoop.it
She's the second consecutive New York beauty queen to take the Miss America title, but she's the first Indian-American to wear the national crown.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 16, 2013 1:17 PM

Quoting directly from the article, "Racists took to Twitter to lambaste the pageant for picking an Indian-American."  This got me the thinking about the topic from multiple perspectives.  First of all, the United States is becoming increasingly diverse as the white population's fertility rate is slowing and this is seen as emblematic of that shift.  But does disagreeing with the pageant's evaluation of beauty make all of the critics racists?  Certainly not; although I'm sure their was a strong racist undercurrent to the much of the criticism, the pageant seeks to quantitatively measure and rank beauty.  The idea of beauty is culturally constructed and varies based on the cultural milleu of the individual; there is perhaps nothing more subjective in the world, and the criteria for beauty has changed over time, and certainly various across space as many culture value different attributes.  Why is anyone arguing about the bias in the selection process of Miss America when the process is inherently subjective and based on the cultural preferences of the judges?  Maybe the real question is this: why is anyone evaluating the worth and importance of women in society based on evening gown poise and swimsuit appearance?              

Linda Alexander's comment, September 16, 2013 11:55 PM
I agree with your overall assessment, Seth, but do feel the twitter feed is worthy of further examination. I also noted that this winner, for a change, is advocating for girls in the STEM fields and appears to be quite different from the norm. She looks different, thinks different and acts different. Is that another reason for the unsettling discomfort that sparked the racists remarks? Yes, but sorry, but the world really is changing folks, so deal with it. Anyhow, it's a step in the right direction when beauty is not defined by age-old standards, thinking and behavior. However, at the end of the day, I don't particularly like beauty contests either and didn't watch this one....
Alison Antonelli's curator insight, September 25, 2013 7:32 PM

I think this is really cool. That is something to be extremely proud of, to be the first Indian-American to win Miss America.

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9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask | Geography | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 31, 2013 6:03 PM

You know that you should know more about the current events in Syria; so read this article to get started.


Mrs. B's curator insight, September 3, 2013 8:09 PM

Summary of article goes here. A nice, juicy paragraph or so. Just read the article and tell someone what it was about conversationally. 

 

Connection goes here. How does this extremely relevant article relate to the Nature and Perspectives of Geography? This would be a great time to drop some APHUG vocab.Here are some examples: globalization, spatial distribution, 5 themes ofgeography, perception of places, patterns, distribution, scale, location(absolute and relative), environmental determinism, cultural landscape, senseof place, built environment, possibilism, place, centrality, GIS, diffusion(expansion, contagious, hierarchical, stimulus, relocation), cultural barrier,time-distance decay, mental maps, remote sensing, regions (functional, formal,perceptual), mental maps, sequent occupance, hearths, independent invention. 

This is where you get CREATIVE. 


I hope your post gets comments!

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 8, 2013 9:19 AM

Nice small and quick article the will make the reader see the basics of what is happening in Syria.  It is a great place to start and has some references of where to look if you want to do more.  This area was formed much like Africa.  Random boundaries drawn on the map by colonial powers.  And just like Africa this area has many issues.  Interesting thought??!!

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Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran

Rap, Drugs, And Hijabs: 13 Things You Should Know About Young Iran | Geography | Scoop.it
The future of Iran will be determined by the first post-Revolution generation. Here's what they're like.

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Siri Anderson's curator insight, August 25, 2013 9:52 AM

Who knew? Would be nice to have students develop some raps that appealed to democratic, peaceful, shared-world sensibilities.

Mrs. B's curator insight, October 5, 2013 9:36 AM

POPULATION PYRAMIDS!

Isabelle Zahn's curator insight, January 18, 2014 3:02 PM

In this article you see the concept of gender population and folk culture. This article talks about how Iran has had their baby boom population in there right now between the mid teens and the mid-20s. It also talks about how all of the young people are starting to control everything and things are becoming run by the young people. Most of the government is run by young people there all of the young people are just starting to pop up and down getting married as you get there I having more kids because it's a big huge population of young people. This has an impact on every music sucks local national and international communities because every community at some point will have a baby boom generation for us right now it's kind of an older generation for other countries the younger generations so really every time she goes through these baby-boom stages. Some short-term effects of this could be a lot of new births because all the people are starting to get a little bit older because their mid teens to mid 20s they will be getting married soon and will want have families.  Some long-term effects could be another baby boom generation possibly coming because of this baby boom generation all the side to have kids that he couldn't another baby boom generation were everybody wants to have a kid so their country may decide to good use birth control or something that will reduce the chances of having another baby good population because their country can't support all of those people. 

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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | Geography | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:50 PM

Although this was a rescooped article from another geography profile, when you clicked on it the link didn't come up. Here is the main link: http://mentalfloss.com/article/52558/107-regional-slang-words. A ton of people use slang words, but can you think of one hundred and seven different ones that you use? I know before I watched this video I couldn't. Just the first seven listed in this video were all describing a can of Dr. Pepper. One term they used that I had never heard was a Tonic. This was used in Boston so it was surprising to not here of it, especially when being so close to RI. Other slangs words varied from calling a grinder a hoogie, saying something is Baltic, meaning cold, and streams being called branches, usually in Wisconsin. It was interesting to see all the different words used to describe everyday items all around the world. We may talk a lot of slang, but I can guarantee that no one has heard of all these different slang terms. Great video produced by a funny guy, really enjoyable.  

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 11:10 AM

This was a neat video.  Many of the slang words that I knew about were touched upon, but many were very new to me.  I never knew the "bubbler" originated in Wisconsin.  I thought that was purely a R.I. thing.  Watching the video made me think of how different regions were originally settled by different ethnicity groups between the early 1600's and 1800's, which almost surely led to these slangs, in my opinion.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:55 PM

This was a great video describing what people call different items all over the world.  Just in Rhode Island alone, people from different parts of the state refer to items in different ways.  I think it could have been better if he stuck to the United States only.  Its crazy how different people experience things so close in proximity to each other.  It also would have been great to show how different regions in the U.S. say certain words.  He probably could have made a 30 minute video on that alone and it would have been hilarious.

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Picture of the Day: Amsterdam from Above

Picture of the Day: Amsterdam from Above | Geography | Scoop.it

Amsterdam fans out south from the Amsterdam Centraal railway station. The oldest area of the town is known as de Wallen (the quays). Seen in the image above is the 17th century canal ring area of Amsterdam. The city has more than one hundred kilometres of canals, about 90 islands and 1,500 bridges. [Source]

 

Amsterdam is the capital and most populous city of the Netherlands with a population of 805,166 within the city-proper, 1,563,141 in the urban region and 2,349,870 in the greater metropolitan area. It is located in the province of North Holland in the west of the country. Originating as a small fishing village in the late 12th century, Amsterdam became one of the most important ports in the world during the Dutch Golden Age, a result of its innovative developments in trade. [Source]


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 6, 2013 8:09 PM

Amazing picture.  Also amazing is the technolgy that was used in the 12th century to keep the ocean out of this beautiful place.  Imagine the cost of a project like that in today's dollars or Euros. 

Mathijs Booden's comment, November 7, 2013 3:07 AM
The best thing about this view is the lack of high-rise buildings in the city centre.<br><br>@Al: the water body in the distance is not the ocean yet although it used to be. It's the Markerwaard, which is separated by two dikes from the North Sea and used to be a connected to the North Sea until early 20th century engineering efforts. The dike building was not directly aimed at protecting Amsterdam, but rather at reclaiming new land for agriculture. The Markerwaard (and IJsselmeer are now viewed as more important for recreation and water management and were never fully turned into polders.
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Feeding 9 Billion

Feeding 9 Billion | Geography | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, April 30, 2014 11:09 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.   

 

This article relates well to the Population topic in Global Challenges and issues that arise from the present growth patterns.  

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:59 PM

As population continues to grow and agricultural lands dissappear, the issue of feeding the world is becoming a growing concern.

The environmental places of the world are becoming arid and the agrarian places are dwindling affecting the human/environment interaction by introducing agricultural issues.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:52 PM

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  This one question brings up many more spatial, environmental, political and social questions--this interactive feature nicely addresses many of the pertinent issues in a very accessible manner.    

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture. 

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Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014

Top 10 Safest Countries In The World In 2014 | Geography | Scoop.it
This list attempts to pinpoint the 10 safest countries in the world by analyzing the Global Peace Index, or GPI, of each country, taking into consideration homicide rates, levels of violent crime, nuclear capabilities and more.

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Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:19 AM

L'indice de paix global agrège des facteurs comme le taux d'homicide, celui de crimes violents et autres. On a un bon modèle pas lui, tout près: la Belgique, n°10 de ce classement. En règle générale, à l'exception notable de la Nouvelle-Zélande, il vaut vivre au nord de l'hémisphère nord...

16s3d's curator insight, May 2, 2014 3:50 AM

L'indice de paix global agrège des facteurs comme le taux d'homicide, celui de crimes violents et autres. On a un bon modèle pas lui, tout près: la Belgique, n°10 de ce classement. En règle générale, à l'exception notable de la Nouvelle-Zélande, il vaut vivre au nord de l'hémisphère nord...

Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:45 PM

For looking at crime

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Where Each City's Uninsured Live

Where Each City's Uninsured Live | Geography | Scoop.it
Insured people are all alike, but uninsured people are uninsured for their own reasons.

 

It can be tempting to think of 'the uninsured' as the poorest of the poor. But that's not entirely the case. While people living below the poverty line are the most likely to be without health insurance, 28 percent of people who make between 100 and 200 percent of poverty level (up to about $23,340) lack coverage, as do 15 percent of those who make between 200 and 400 percent (up to about $46,700).

These maps, created by Kevin Johnson and used here with permission, show where people not covered by either private or public insurance live in each city. Johnson used the 2012 American Community Survey; higher uninsured rates are represented by red and orange colors.


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Shanghai's Global Ascendance

Shanghai's Global Ascendance | Geography | Scoop.it

Reuters photographer Carlos Barria recently spent time in Shanghai, China, the fastest-growing city in the world. A week ago, he took this amazing shot, recreating the same framing and perspective as a photograph taken in 1987, showing what a difference 26 years can make. The setting is Shanghai's financial district of Pudong, dominated by the Oriental Pearl Tower at left, and the new 125-story Shanghai Tower, China's tallest building and the world's second tallest skyscraper, at 632 meters (2,073 ft) high, scheduled to finish by the end of 2014. Shanghai, the largest city by population in the world, has been growing at a rate of about 10 percent a year the past 20 years, and now is home to 23.5 million people -- nearly double what it was back in 1987. This entry is focused on this single photo pairing, with several ways to compare the two.


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 12:38 PM

It is amazing how quick a city can change in only 26 years. Since this picture was taken in 1987, the city's population has doubled, and is continuing to grow rapidly. Today, this city is one of the largest in the world and has magnificent skyscrapers, one of which is the second tallest in the world. It is obvious globalization hit this mega city very quickly, making it one of the most impressive cities in the world. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:37 PM

Buildings, skyscrapers and urbanization. Why not? This is how the world is and this is what attacks tourists. For Shanghai, they need to be up to par with all the other business and tech savvy countries and cities. This is how they are going to keep their technological business, by building what needs to be built. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:16 PM

unit 7

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Venezuela breaks ties with Panama

Venezuela breaks ties with Panama | Geography | Scoop.it

Venezuela's President, Nicolas Maduro, has broken diplomatic relations and frozen economic ties with Panama.  The decision comes after the Central American nation requested a meeting at the Organization of American States (OAS) to discuss Venezuela's crisis.


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We Are Just Not Here Anymore

We Are Just Not Here Anymore | Geography | Scoop.it
Can we learn to reconnect without using our digital devices?

 

At weddings, guests tweet real-time of the festivities to friends far away. At sporting events, fans follow scores of games in other cities. In classrooms, students text with friends in other classes and parents out in the world. At funerals, mourners to pals in other places.

Everyone, it seems, is interacting more with people who are elsewhere — and less with the people around them. As technology seeps through society, dampening every dry aspect of our lives, something is happening to: the idea of being present; the desire to be in the moment; the notion of living right here and right now.


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The world divided, 1 billion people per colored... - Maps on the Web

The world divided, 1 billion people per colored... - Maps on the Web | Geography | Scoop.it

The world divided, 1 billion people per colored region Related: The world divided into regions with a GDP of 1 trillion dollars (The world divided, 1 billion people per colored region http://t.co/F7TQMYDXXA)...


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Amsterdam: Street Photography From a Boat | Tim Steadman

Amsterdam: Street Photography From a Boat | Tim Steadman | Geography | Scoop.it


This past July, my wife and I and our 5 month old son took a canal cruise in Amsterdam. Armed with a Fuji X-Pro 1, 18-55mm lens, and a couple shoulders worth of baby and associated paraphernalia, we found our dock, waited in the shade, and boarded a large, flat, and disrespectfully orange canal cruiser. Passing the friendly yet dispirited looking skipper, I noticed how crowded the boat was. The only available seats were under glass. Damn! The glass which protects tourists from the notoriously unpredictable weather of Amsterdam was stubbornly blocking any breeze that was desperately needed on that muggy July day. It was also doubling as a seriously neglected 1" thick Chinese knock-off Tiffenesque quality lens filter.  We sat down. Annoying thoughts began to surface... Maybe the glass will add a trendy patina to the photos?... Man it is hot... We paid to sit in a floating greenhouse... I turned around. Look at those lucky people in the back with their hair flowing in sync with the cool Netherlandic breeze... Good thing this is a Hop on Hop off boat...


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The History of Chemical Warfare

The History of Chemical Warfare | Geography | Scoop.it

"The history of chemical weapons is largely a history of occasions on which they have not been used. This is in part because they were prohibited—indeed, they were banned before they were actually used."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 4, 2013 1:23 PM

Syria's uses of chemical weapons has raised concern to prevention the proliferation and usage of weapons of these sorts. 

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Unique Food Experiences

Unique Food Experiences | Geography | Scoop.it

Most Rhode Islander's have had a Del's Lemonade or a Doughboy from Iggy's.  These regional treats are some things I always take visitors from out of state to enjoy so they can 'properly' experience Rhode Island since they are iconic emblems of the Ocean State.  This is a list of 7 unique eateries that you can only find in Rhode Island or across the border in Massachusetts.  While on that same trip, the authors of that article also cataloged a list of 8 of the oldest things in New England, a list with great historic qualities. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What do culinary customs say about a state and region?  How does what foods are eaten shape the local culture?  How does this help to create a regional identity?  How do 'authentic' foods help create or foster a sense of place?


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Do Christians, Muslims and Jews worship the same God?

Do Christians, Muslims and Jews worship the same God? | Geography | Scoop.it
Opinion by Jeffrey Weiss, Special to CNN


(CNN) -- Sunni and Shia Muslims are killing each other in several nations, most notably in Syria's escalating civil war.

Coptic Christians churches are being torched in Egypt.

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Matthew Wahl's curator insight, September 1, 2013 2:21 PM

Good intro to monotheism...shows how each of the "big three" tackles the issue of having the same Abrahamic tradition. 

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The Great Language Game

The Great Language Game | Geography | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:59 AM

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 2014 4:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:20 PM

unit 3-- use in class