Gatsby-ness
10 views | +0 today
Follow
Gatsby-ness
Themes and symbols in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, as well as information about the Roaring 20s and author's life.
Curated by Caitlin Moser
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Caitlin Moser
Scoop.it!

1920's Travel

1920's Travellers had the choice of Buses, Trams, Ships, Airships, Planes and Automobiles
more...
Colt Peterson's curator insight, September 2, 2015 7:57 PM

Charley Creek Inn is a living piece of the1920's, but travelers who visit us have it a little bit easier!

Scooped by Caitlin Moser
Scoop.it!

F. Scott Fitzgerald Biography

F. Scott Fitzgerald Biography | Gatsby-ness | Scoop.it
Biography.com presents F. Scott Fitzgerald, author of The Great Gatsby and as famous for his turbulent personal life as his often brilliant novels and stories.
Caitlin Moser's insight:

CRAP test info paragraph

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Caitlin Moser from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

'Nothing Any Good Isn't Hard': F. Scott Fitzgerald's Secret to Great Writing

'Nothing Any Good Isn't Hard': F. Scott Fitzgerald's Secret to Great Writing | Gatsby-ness | Scoop.it
The 'Great Gatsby' author didn't sugarcoat his thoughts—and insisted that no writer ever should.

Via Charles Tiayon
Caitlin Moser's insight:

Get inside the mind of the author himself!

more...
DylanSmith's curator insight, June 27, 2013 10:42 AM

This article is about The Great Gatsby author F. Scott Fitzgerald and how he turned into such a great author. In a pair of letters written in the 1930s Fitzgerald describes his passion for writing and how it has influenced his life. This article gives great insight into the inner workings of one of the greatest authors in the 20th century.

 

I think this would be a good article to use before reading The Great Gatsby, so students can see how passionate that F. Scott Fitzgerald is about writing. I think discussing this article in class prior to reading the novel would be benefical because it gives students a greater understanding of who he was. 

Scooped by Caitlin Moser
Scoop.it!

The Great Gatsby - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Great Gatsby is a novel by American author F. Scott Fitzgerald. The story takes place in 1922, during the Roaring Twenties, a time of prosperity in the United States after World War I. The book received critical acclaim and is generally considered Fitzgerald's best work. It is also widely regarded as a "Great American Novel" and a literary classic, capturing the essence of an era. The Modern Library named it the second best English language novel of the 20th century.[1]

With The Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald made a conscious departure from the writing process of his previous novels. He started planning it in June 1922,[citation needed] after completing his play The Vegetable and began composing The Great Gatsby in 1923.[2] He ended up discarding most of it as a false start, some of which resurfaced in the story "Absolution".[3] Unlike his previous works, Fitzgerald intended to edit and reshape Gatsby thoroughly, believing that it held the potential to launch him toward literary acclaim. He told his editor Maxwell Perkins that the novel was a "consciously artistic achievement" and a "purely creative work — not trashy imaginings as in my stories but the sustained imagination of a sincere and yet radiant world". He added later, during editing, that he felt "an enormous power in me now, more than I've ever had".[4]

After the birth of their child, the Fitzgeralds moved to Great Neck, Long Island in October 1922, a setting used as the scene for The Great Gatsby.[6] Fitzgerald's neighbors in Great Neck included such prominent and newly wealthy New Yorkers as writer Ring Lardner, actor Lew Fields and comedian Ed Wynn.[3] These figures were all considered to be 'new money', unlike those who came from Manhasset Neck or Cow Neck Peninsula, places which were home to many of New York's wealthiest established families, and which sat across a bay from Great Neck. This real-life juxtaposition gave Fitzgerald his idea for "West Egg" and "East Egg." In this novel, Great Neck became the new-money peninsula of "West Egg" and Manhasset the old-money peninsula of "East Egg".[7]

more...
Caitlin Moser's comment, March 13, 2013 9:52 AM
CRAP Test and Paragraph for this one!!!
Scooped by Caitlin Moser
Scoop.it!

The Great Gatsby and the American dream

The Great Gatsby and the American dream | Gatsby-ness | Scoop.it
Class inequality and 'the gospel of wealth' – in tackling such issues F Scott Fitzgerald's masterpiece has never been more relevant.
Caitlin Moser's insight:

One theme of The Great Gatsby is the decay of the American Dream. Is it possible? What has the American Dream come to mean today? How is it different from what it was for our ancestors who settled this land?

more...
No comment yet.