Garinger APHUGE
Follow
124 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ms. Carter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Inside India’s pop-up city

Inside India’s pop-up city | Garinger APHUGE | Scoop.it
Every 12 years, the Kumbh Mela, a centuries-old Hindu pilgrimage, temporarily transforms an empty floodplain in India into one of the biggest cities in the world.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 2013 9:43 PM

Hindu pilgrims from all over India flock to bathe where it the Yamuna Saraswati Rivers join with the Ganges River for a religious experience.  This is a massive undertaking where the cultural practices create migratory patterns that reshape cities because of a sacred physical geography

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 12:21 AM

This article is about the sacred gathering which occurs every 12 years at the merging point of the sacred Hindu rivers. Millions of people bathe in the waters daily during the Kumbh Mela. This sacred physical geography causes a massive human migration and creates a temporary mega-city. The temporary city is an excellent way to experiment with the planning of mega cities which, as evidenced by the problematic physical and human geography of Mexico City, are often not planned so much as just they just expand to meet the needs of the time. Urban planning should be particularly interesting for the people of India as the rapid population growth will cause significant expansion in its cities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 13, 1:43 PM

Every 12 years Hindus come together for a religious gathering, which results in the creation of a temporary mega city. The millions of people who attend this Hindu pilgrimage create this mega city for 55 days. It is impressive to see a temporary city supply housing, electricity, food and clean drinking water for millions of people. 

Rescooped by Ms. Carter from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Garinger APHUGE | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:11 AM
I agree with Don, couldn't have said it better.
Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

Rescooped by Ms. Carter from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

If the World Where a Village of 100 People...

What if the world's population were reduced to 100 people community?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners.  For more information see: http://www.miniature-earth.com/


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ms. Carter from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Understanding Population Pyramids

This covers what a population pyramid is, and how to analyze one. It covers the three basic shapes and how they correspond to population growth or decline.

 

Simple introduction on how to analyze population pyramids.   Update: some these slides originally came from a different presentation, which has since been revised.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's comment, May 10, 2012 9:48 PM
http://houstonhs.scsk12.org/~mrobinson/Mr._Robinsons_Web_Site_at_Houston_High_School/June_Presentation.html
Is the URL for the revised presentation.
Rescooped by Ms. Carter from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

The Miniature Earth Project

The Miniature Earth Project | Garinger APHUGE | Scoop.it
Miniature Earth. What if the population of the world were reduced into a community of only 100 people?

 

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this infographic and website attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to young learners. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Emma Lupo's curator insight, October 21, 1:10 AM

Intro to liveability