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Eat Plants And Prosper: For Longevity, Go Easy On The Meat, Study Says

Eat Plants And Prosper: For Longevity, Go Easy On The Meat, Study Says | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
A new study cautions that eating a diet rich in animal proteins could be as harmful to health as smoking. Not quite, other researchers say, but it's still a good idea to go heavy on the greens.
Marty Roddy's insight:

great and obvious- too bad too many people are sheeple

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Gardens and Gardening
Growing a good healthy fun organic garden. Deal with weeds and bugs and grow great vegetables and fruit. How to make and use compost? Extend the season? create an easy to water garden? other topics
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This is why I compost and garden organically- June Stoyer

This is why I compost and garden organically- June Stoyer | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
This is why I compost and #garden #organically! -June Stoyer http://t.co/Eh3GHreZnA #food
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Time to plant garlic | Gardening Advice, Tips, Growing Media, Compost, Westland Horticulture

Time to plant garlic | Gardening Advice, Tips, Growing Media, Compost, Westland Horticulture | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Planting garlic is really simple. Have a go this weekend for a bumper crop next year! #autumngardening http://t.co/276sOemV82
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New Dallas company aims to be the Mary Kay of garden goods - Dallas Morning News

New Dallas company aims to be the Mary Kay of garden goods - Dallas Morning News | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Dallasnews.com is the official website for The Dallas Morning News newspaper.
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Build a Hugelkultur Bed - Mother Earth News

Mother Earth News
Build a Hugelkultur Bed
Mother Earth News
Hugelkultur beds are made to retain moisture, serve as a living bed and support various root structures of a number of different plant species.
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Composting Methods | EcoMENA

The methodology of composting can be categorized into three major segments—anaerobic composting, aerobic composting, and vermicomposting. In anaerobic composting, the organic matter is decomposed in the absence of air. Organic matter may be collected in pits and covered with a thick layer of soil and left undisturbed six to eight months.The compost so formed may not be completely converted and may include aggregated masses.

Aerobic composting is the process by which organic wastes are converted into compost or manure in presence of air and can be of different types. The most common is the Heap Method, where organic matter needs to be divided into three different types and to be placed in a heap one over the other, covered by a thin layer of soil or dry leaves. This heap needs to be mixed every week, and it takes about three weeks for conversion to take place.


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Composting kitchen waste

Zero Garbage through Composting and Reuse...

Composting is the best way to dispose off the kitchen waste or the wet waste or degradable garbage.

Why to compost?

If we compost one day, we can save almost one kg garbage everyday from going to landfill, hence around 365 kg of garbage yearly on an average.

We can get around 40 Kg of compost manure from this amount of garbage in one year, rich in carbon and nitrogenous contents and good for plants.

Every day, a small suburb town can throw around 300-500 tons of garbage or even more than that.. We can save the garbage handling and transportation charges by reducing it by composting kitchen waste.

What do I need to start composting?

A compost starter or bio-culture, for aerobic composting

A basket with enough holes or small slits for aeration

A spoon or small spade to stir the garbage

A vegetable scissors if needed

Which garbage can we use?

Vegetables and fruit scrap, Coconut hair, Flower waste from temples and homes, garden waste, waste tea powder, left-over cooked rice (in small amounts)

What are the steps to compost garbage?

Step 1. Initially, put first layer of fresh leaves and one inch layer of Bio-Culture over that. Sprinkle one handful of water and leave it for 2 days. Make it bit moist, not wet.

Step 2. Start adding wet garbage from 3rd day and put the bio-culture in garbage more than half of garbage quantity and mix well. For first 15 days, mixing and stirring should be done on daily basis.

Step 3. After 15 days, mixing and stirring can be repeated once in 2-3 days. Keep on adding garbage and bio-culture in layers.

Best practices for best compost-

Keep the mixture bit moist if it becomes dry, by sprinkling water. Composting becomes fast when 30 to 40% moisture is maintained

Cut garbage in medium / small pieces to ensure fast composting. Use a vegetable scissors, it helps.

Place the basket on a newspaper, so that the particles falling through holes fall on the paper

What to do if something goes wrong?

1. If some foul smell comes, you can sprinkle Marigold (Zendu) flowers on that by well crushing them. Its strong smell destroys foul smell. Also, put more BC to ensure decomposition and not decay

2. If maggots develop, don’t worry. Add dry tobacco and maggots disappear. Then add culture and more garbage to avoid this. Maggots rise if garbage is less or it’s not stirred properly and the mixture gets heated.

3. If ants attack, don’t worry! Sprinkle turmeric or red chili powder, and ants run away. Ants come if fruit peels are put, which have some sugar content. Once they decompose, ants go.

4. If the mixture becomes dry, sprinkle enough water so that the process becomes bit fast

5. DO NOT PUT cooked food waste, stale food, bread etc. That needs to be taken care off well. Cooked food is best decomposed with vermi-culture, and that needs good attention.

6. Fruit peels like mango, papaya can be dried for some time and then put them in the basket.

 

 

 http://zerogarbageindia.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=56&Itemid=62

 


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Planting garlic? Weather conditions are key. - Washington Post

Planting garlic? Weather conditions are key. - Washington Post | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Conditions have to be just right, but even if rain is in the forecast there are things you can do.
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Letter: Put away leaf blowers, and mulch - The Journal News | LoHud.com

Letter: Put away leaf blowers, and mulch - The Journal News | LoHud.com | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Mulching means using a mower to chop the leaves into small pieces. These can be left on lawns or pushed under shrubs and around the base of trees.
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Oregon criminalizes permaculture; claims state ownership over all rainwater - ponds and swales restricted - jail time for violators

Oregon criminalizes permaculture; claims state ownership over all rainwater - ponds and swales restricted - jail time for violators | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Oregon criminalizes permaculture; claims state ownership over all rainwater - ponds and swales restricted - jail time for violators
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Gardening & Homesteading

Gardening &  Homesteading | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
6 Ways to Make Great Compost: In a three-bin compost system, the first bin (left) holds fresh materials ready for composting.Materials are moved to the second bin (middle) to keep things running hot and decomposing fast.
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Hugelkultur Raised Garden Beds - Made... - The Preppers Republic | Facebook

Hugelkultur Raised Garden Beds - Made with reclaimed wood from wood pallets
http://thehomesteadsurvival.com/hugelkultur-raised-garden-beds/
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Mother Juice Gets You to Eat Your Vegetables - Boston.com

Mother Juice Gets You to Eat Your Vegetables - Boston.com | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Mother Juice Gets You to Eat Your Vegetables
Boston.com
I'll admit that I've never really caved to the juice trend before, and generally lean towards bowls that contain burrito contents over quinoa.
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Boost nutrition by adding weeds to your diet - Colorado Springs Gazette

Boost nutrition by adding weeds to your diet - Colorado Springs Gazette | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Boost nutrition by adding weeds to your diet
Colorado Springs Gazette
Not everyone can say they enjoy being knee-deep in weeds. But meet Tamara Geene, who with her son, Drew, makes a business of growing weeds - the edible kind.
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Temperate Climate Permaculture Food Forest (Riverton, New Zealand)

Temperate Climate Permaculture Food Forest (Riverton, New Zealand) | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
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Planting of medicinal plants in the yard of our house | Traditional Herbal medicine

Planting of medicinal plants in the yard of our house | Traditional Herbal medicine | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
drugs, Herbs are natural medicines that can be obtained easily how the treatment of various diseases such as high blood using herbs and supplements
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The Benefits of Using Natural Homemade Compost - GardYard

The Benefits of Using Natural Homemade Compost - GardYard | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
The Benefits of Using Natural Homemade Compost
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Leaves Make Great Organic Mulch and Compost

Leaves Make Great Organic Mulch and Compost | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it

"Luckily, dead leaves are loaded with nutrients and can be used as organic mulch and compost in your gardens and beds."

 

"Mulch is a necessary component for protecting plants against winter weather while also preserving moisture and nutrients."

.


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George Smith's curator insight, October 29, 2013 9:04 AM

Consider leaving your leaves in plant beds, but be careful to much of a good thing can be no good.

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Why wood chips make the best organic mulch | Big Blog Of Gardening ~ organic gardening and organic lawn care

Why wood chips make the best organic mulch | Big Blog Of Gardening ~ organic gardening and organic lawn care | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Wood chips are a long lasting organic mulch for trees, shrubs, and perennials which in many cases can be had for free...

 

 

If you garden, you may often hear that arborist wood chips should not be used as mulch, which actually is not supported by studies. Wood chips are one of the best mulches for trees and shrubs, but may not be the best for annuals and vegetables, according to Dr. Linda Chalker-Scott from Washington State University.

 

 

 

 

In a 1990 study comparing 15 different organic mulches, wood chips were one of the best for holding moisture, moderating soil temperatures, controlling weeds, and overall sustainability. Wood chips absorb more water than many other mulches, water which both cools the soil and is slowly released to plants.

 

Economically wood chips work too, as in most areas they can be obtained free from arborists or local recycle centers. Obtaining them from local sources rather than in bags at chain stores, trucked in from distant locations, keeps the product out of landfills and supports less fuel wasted on trucking. They’re also economical in that being slow to break down, wood chips will last longer than most other choices, so don’t need replenishing as often.

Dr. Chalker-Scott points out that since wood chips contain materials of various sizes—bark, wood, and leaves—they are more resistant to compaction than sawdust and bark. This diverse selection of materials also supports a diverse selection of soil microorganisms. These, in turn, are more resistant to environmental stresses and create a healthier plant environment.

One of the main concerns, and reason often cited for not using wood chips, is that they will tie up nitrogen and cause plants to be hungry. When wood chips are used on trees and shrubs, many studies have shown just the opposite. While there is likely a shallow zone near the surface under a layer of wood chips in which nitrogen is often lacking (organisms use up nitrogen as they break down organic matter), the deeper roots of shrubs and trees should have sufficient nutrients in good soils. This shallow zone under wood chips, lacking in nitrogen, may help reduce weed seed germination. Fewer weeds means more nutrients available for your plants.

Since this surface zone, lacking nutrients, is the area of the shallow roots of annuals and many vegetables, wood chips are not best to use for these. Nor would they be good on first year perennials, or those with shallow roots such as yarrow. If concerned about a lack of nitrogen, with shrubs and trees, use a nutrient-rich compost layer on the soil before applying wood chips. This “mulch sandwich” is similar to what one finds in a forest ecosystem, and is what the wood chips will form on their own over time.

Some gardeners apply extra fertilizer to the soil surface, particularly nitrogen-rich ones, prior to applying wood chips. For organic nitrogen sources, you could use blood meal (12 percent nitrogen), fish meal (9 percent), cottonseed meal (6 percent) or soybean meal (also 6 percent) among others. A 5-3-4 analysis organic fertilizer supplies nitrogen as well other nutrients.

Another major concern is whether wood chips will bring in diseases. If this is a worry, let them age for a year or two before applying. The downside to this is that some of the nutritional value will be lost. Studies have shown that wood chips don’t transmit disease organisms to roots of healthy trees. In healthy soils, there are more good fungal diseases that out-compete the bad ones on roots. In healthy plants, weak plant diseases can’t get established. These are often called “opportunistic” diseases, as they take advantage of opportunities for infection, such as wounding of bark and damaged roots.

While the studies noted were done on roots, tree tops weren’t mentioned. Unfortunately, in my own experience, I unknowingly imported some leaf diseases (needlecast in particular) on bark spread under susceptible spruce species. Control required more spraying than was possible or desirable, so these trees are now mostly dead. Other species not susceptible to this disease are fine. So my lesson learned is not to use bark or other wood products like wood chips from unknown sources, which may have come from infected trees, around evergreens that may get leaf diseases.

Yet, in other areas and similar to some growers I know, I’ve used wood chips on trees and shrubs with no effect on their growth. This mulch has not acidified soils, as is often claimed, nor has it increased pests such as carpenter ants, nor has it killed the plants through leaching harmful (“allelopathic”) chemicals.

More on the use of wood chips, and other horticultural myths based on a review of scientific studies, can be found on Dr. Chalker-Scott’s website (www.informedgardener.com).

Dr Leonard Perry is an Extension Professor at the University Of Vermont and an advisor to the Vermont Association Of Professional Horticulturists

 


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Compost Fundamentals: Benefits & Uses - use of compost

 

http://whatcom.wsu.edu/ag/compost/fundamentals/benefits_uses.htm

 

 

 

use of compost

Compost is ready for use when the temperature in the pile drops to the temperature of the surrounding air. Other signs are:

It smells earthy—not sour, putrid or like ammonia It no longer heats up after turned or wateredIt looks like dark soilIt’s crumbly, and doesn’t have identifiable food items, leaves or grass.

The pH is usually around 7.5, and it will have a C:N ratio ranging from 10:1 to 20:1.

Planting in compost before it is finished could damage plants. Undecayed carbon materials as wood chips or leaves uses nitrogen from the soil to continue decomposing, robbing it from the plants you grow. Undecayed nitrogen materials can harbor pests and diseases. Immature compost can introduce weed seeds and root-damaging organic acids.

Compost can be used in many ways in the garden. Coarse, semi-decayed woody material is suitable as mulch to put on top of the soil around the plants. It can be used as mulch around trees and shrubs, to keep the moisture in, to prevent weeds from growing around trees and shrubs. The decayed material is good for digging into the soil together with commercial fertilizers at preparation time.

It can be used for installing new lawns. A fine-screened layer can be used for a top dressing on established lawns. It can be used in the planting areas of landscapes. It should be used extensively in vegetable gardens to improve the organic matter content in the soil. It can be used for houseplants, for starting seeds in planting beds or flats, or made into a compost tea for watering plants.

Compost is also useful for erosion control. Erosion often is the end result of low soil fertility. Compost and the humus it contains can actually bind to the soil, building a good structure than encourages optimum fertility and erosion resistance. Studies have shown that a layer of compost works much better along newly planted hillsides beside highways than straw that was traditionally used.

An exciting new use for compost is bioremediation. Many things can contaminate surface waters, soils and reservoirs. Using compost can often restore these. The microorganisms in compost can sequester or break down contaminants in water or soil. Contaminates are digested, metabolized and transformed into humus and inert byproducts such as carbon dioxide, water and salts. Compost bioremediation is effective in degrading or altering chlorinated and nonclorinated hydrocarbons, wood preserving chemicals, solvents, heavy metals, pesticides, petroleum products and explosives.


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Yard and Garden: Properly mulch strawberries for winter - Muscatine Journal

Yard and Garden: Properly mulch strawberries for winter - Muscatine Journal | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
While winter is not growing season for strawberries, taking care of strawberry plants remains vitally important. Before winter arrives, mulch strawberries to protect them, so they’re ready to grow in
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Jennifer Hackbarth: Recipes can help you enjoy wintertime vegetables - Winona Daily News

Jennifer Hackbarth: Recipes can help you enjoy wintertime vegetables - Winona Daily News | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Unfortunately, many of the fresh produce in our area are coming to a seasonal end — except for root vegetables, that is.
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Permaculture Paradise: Alex's PermaGarden – Part 2

Permaculture Paradise: Alex's PermaGarden – Part 2 | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
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sustainable living

sustainable living | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
How to Compost
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New Raised Bed Irrigation - YouTube

My new irrigation system for my raised beds. (RT @Holzster: My new irrigation system for my raised beds. http://t.co/rkvtsPEwwA)
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KC Gardens: It's time to plant vegetables for fall harvest - Kansas City Star

KC Gardens: It's time to plant vegetables for fall harvest - Kansas City Star | Gardens and Gardening | Scoop.it
Kansas City Star
KC Gardens: It's time to plant vegetables for fall harvest
Kansas City Star
Insect pests tend to be less of an issue in late summer and fall.
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