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4 Easy Ways to Add Greenery to Your Small Apartment This Spring - StyleCaster

4 Easy Ways to Add Greenery to Your Small Apartment This Spring - StyleCaster | Gardening | Scoop.it
4 Easy Ways to Add Greenery to Your Small Apartment This Spring
StyleCaster
It's the end of March, and you're probably deep in the throes of some serious cabin fever.
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Here  are  some  great  stylish  ways  of  brightening  up  your  home  

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Is this family's front garden the most dangerous in Britain?

Is this family's front garden the most dangerous in Britain? | Gardening | Scoop.it
Hannah and Ian Jones from Grimsby have had it with vehicles smashing into their front garden. It was hit three times in the space of 20 minutes bringing the total number of collisions to six.
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The  dangers  of  black  ice  and  speeding  
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Honey fungus

Honey fungus | Gardening | Scoop.it
Autumn is the season for mushrooms, the fruiting bodies of fungi that
appear suddenly in our gardens at this time of year, along with morning
mists and the smell of woodsmoke. An integral part of our environment fungi
play an essential role within the ecosystem, converting dead material into
nutrients required for plant growth. However, in the quasi-naturalistic
setting of the garden, not all fungi are created equal. There are
relatively harmless saphrophytic fungi, which live on dead or decaying
organic matter, and aid the process of decomposition. These perform a vital
function and one which, from a gardener’s perspective, is relatively
benign. There are also beneficial micorrhizal fungi which form a
codependnent relationship with the roots of plants, assisting in the uptake
of nutrients from the soil in exchange for sugars and carbohydrates. But
there are also pathogenic fungi, which are rather more of a nuisance,
possessing as they do a penchant for living material.

Two weeks ago, several patches of cinnamon hued mushrooms, each with a
darker central spot on the cap, appeared in one of my regular gardens. This
was not an auspicious start to the day, as these mushrooms bore a marked
resemblance to one of the three signs of the armillaria group of fungi,
also known as honey fungus. Armillaria is a virulent pathogenic genus –
recognised by the RHS as ‘the most destructive fungal disease in UK
gardens’ – which invades the roots of trees and woody perennials, weakening
the plant and then consuming the decaying organic matter. The cap of the
mushroom is convex at first, like a shallow dome or half a tea cake, but as
it ages the outer edges curve upwards, revealing the gills beneath. While
the mushrooms do not necessarily appear each year the presence of honey
fungus is also suggested by a sheet of white fungal growth beneath the bark
at the base of the infected plant, and by the characteristic black
rhizomorphs, or ‘bootlaces’, by means of which the organism can spread long
distances through the soil. The mushrooms in this garden were concentrated
around the decaying remains of some old shrubs, on which both the white
mycelial sheet (which smells very noticeably of mushrooms) and the
beginnings of the bootlaces were evident. Finding the fruiting bodies, with
their characteristic colouring, was a fairly good indicator of what was now
lurking in the lawns and borders. Finding all three signs together removed
any remaining vestiges of doubt. Honey fungus, I was now confident, had
arrived.

To put things in perspective, it is reputedly the case that the largest
living organism is a kind of honey fungus,  Armillaria ostoyae, which
covers an  area larger than 2,000 acres in a forest in Oregon. No wonder
that I wasn’t overjoyed to see its relative manifesting in these Kentish
grounds.

A pair of mature birch trees dominate this garden (there had originally
been three, but one had to be felled last year when I noticed a rotten hole
had developed at the base of one – mentioned in a blog post here), and one
of the newly planted borders near a particularly fine crop of mushrooms
features a Magnolia 'George Henry Kern', Viburnum tinus, and Hydrangea
'Annabelle'. I couldn’t have created a more sumptuous menu for the honey
fungus had I tried – all of these appear on the list of plants particularly
susceptible to this pathogen, so we shall have to keep an eye out for signs
of stress, by which time it may well be too late. I would prefer where
possible to lift the plants and containerise them in the same position with
some artful planting to hide the containers, a plan that’s presently in
negotiation. The first step was to dig out all the infected rotten wood –
stumps and roots were well decayed by now and offered little resistance to
the trusty mattock – and as much soil as possible, all of which was bound
for the bonfire. The chemical control for this was banned for use as a
garden herbicide in 2003, so physical destruction (burning) of infected
material is the only legal option at present. The legislation wasn’t able
to prevent me from disinfecting my tools with Jeyes Fluid before moving on
to other areas of the garden, a sensible precaution to take.

The next step is to have a reputable tree surgeon inspect the remaining
birch trees for signs of infection, particularly as the root and stump of
their departed companion resembles at present some kind of mushroom
gourmand’s fantasy. These trees are too tall and close to the house, and
the garden too exposed and windy, to countenance any chance of structural
weakness.

Should the worst transpire, we will have to look to more resistant plants –
a list of which is available here – to replace those that might succumb too
easily to this voracious fungus. For now, we’re pairing the measures we’ve
already taken to all the optimism we can muster, and hoping it won’t come
to that.

Tthe beginnnings of blue black ‘bootlace’ rhizomorphs in the middle of this
rotten stump
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Here  is  fascinating  article  about  the  scourge  of every garden -  Honey  fungus.
Due  to  this mild  weather  we  had  up to now it  brought  on  a  lot of  fungi  spores  about.

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Walliser: Here are 5 houseplants that thrive in low light

Walliser: Here are 5 houseplants that thrive in low light | Gardening | Scoop.it
If you've struggled to grow houseplants in the past due to having low light conditions in your home, you may want to give them
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Putting Compost on Wheels

Putting Compost on Wheels | Gardening | Scoop.it
Reclaimed Organics is closing the food loop, bringing food scraps from New York City back into the soil as compost for a community garden in the East Village.
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Five Of Sri Lanka's Best Green Buildings

Five Of Sri Lanka's Best Green Buildings | Gardening | Scoop.it
Humans have constructed buildings since the New Stone Age, starting with simple structures built for shelter using natural materials. For many centuries later, the construction of buildings was almost one with nature, using rocks, rubble, and naturally occurring substances, until the Iron Age, when
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Best Gifts for Gardeners of All Ages

Best Gifts for Gardeners of All Ages | Gardening | Scoop.it
One-stop shopping for gardening & garden related gifts to fit every budget and season. Written by an avid organic gardener featuring products we use. Perfect for Mothers & Fathers Day, Christmas,etc.
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Garden Tower 2: 50-Plant Composting Container Garden

Garden Tower 2: 50-Plant Composting Container Garden | Gardening | Scoop.it
Purchase the composting 50 plant senior accessible vertical Garden Tower for organic patio vegetable gardening by Garden Tower Project.
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Here  is  a  ideal  gift  suitable  for  everywhere, Kitchens conservatory  etc  where  you  can  grow  strawberries   
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Conflict at Kew Gardens grows with the funding gap

Conflict at Kew Gardens grows with the funding gap | Gardening | Scoop.it
Internal problems and a budget crisis at Kew threaten its reputation as the
world's number one botanic institution, writes Tim Richardson
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Though  this  is  very  sad  news to  hear    it  is  not  altogether  new .
As  an  article  from   the  BBC   on  March  4th  last  year  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-31715081  
has  pointed  out  that  their  funding   was  short   quoting  " financial black hole £5.5m a year"  and  even  the  year  after  that  https://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/dec/17/kew-gardens-job-losses-budget-scientists    
So  it  seems  to  Me  that  they  are  on  a  down  spiral   unless  the  government  steps  in  or  the  Heritage  Fund  and  pulls  it  out  of  the  rabbit  hole    
 
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Bees lured into boosting food supply

Bees lured into boosting food supply | Gardening | Scoop.it
Cambridge scientists believe their discovery of a secret ingredient that attracts bees is a first step to feeding the world.
Via Microgrower
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If we  stop killing  them  with  pesticides  that  is  we  might  be  able  to  achieve  this  
 
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Eric Larson's curator insight, October 28, 2016 10:42 AM
Boosting food supply?
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12 Amazing DIY Water Garden Ideas ~ Oldecors

Amazing diy water garden ideas. outdoor water features. small pond ideas. garden fish tank. Water feature is often presented to sweeten the garden, either in the form of pond or just plain watering plants. The presence of gurgling water,
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Here are 12  amazing  DIY  water garden  ideas  to  think  about  of  you  are  
either  creative  and  good  at  doing  DIY  
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Starting a small garden from scratch: first tackle the soil

Starting a small garden from scratch: first tackle the soil | Gardening | Scoop.it
A town garden can be a place of peace and contemplation, to grow food and watch nature
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Here  is  a  excellent  guide  on  how  to  start  a  garden  from  scratch.

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101 Gardening Secrets Experts Never Tell You

101 Gardening Secrets Experts Never Tell You | Gardening | Scoop.it
101 Tips, Problem Solvers and Dollar Stretchers for Organic Gardeners: This page divulges 101+ gardening secrets that the pros, retailers, and giant chemical corporations don't want you to know.
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Garden Pest Control

Garden Pest Control | Gardening | Scoop.it
Garden Pest Control from HGTV
Via Microgrower, Eric Larson
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I love  this.
Because  either  you  are  a  beginner  or  professional it  spells  it  out  for  you.
The  first  steps  in I P C  (  Identify Protection  Management/Control )  method   and  that  is  be  vigilant  inspect  the  plants  in  your  garden  centre  and  I  would  go  one  step  further  if  possible  replace  the   old  compost  with  fresh one  as  you  never  know  what  is  hibernating  in the  soil  and  waiting  to  eat  your  plants  especially  if  it  lily  beetle  and  slugs           
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Eric Larson's curator insight, October 17, 2016 5:24 PM
Interesting pest control?
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How to Make a Holiday Wreath | Organic Gardening Blog

How to Make a Holiday Wreath | Organic Gardening Blog | Gardening | Scoop.it
For you crafty types...�� https://t.co/X3CYUa1QMW
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My new robot friend Kobi loves to mow the lawn and plow snow

My new robot friend Kobi loves to mow the lawn and plow snow | Gardening | Scoop.it
Kobi is a modular robot that’s basically a Roomba for snow and leaves. It’ll mulch grass and leaves, throw snow into a dedicated area, and mow the lawn. You have to define its physica
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As  2016  gardening  seasons  closes we  can  only  wonder  what  next  year  will  bring.
My  self  Ill  take  manageable  and  realistic  bite  size  in  forecasting.
But  will  the  future  hold  for  us  now  we  have  already  come  step  forward  technically  with robotic  mowers  and  Astro  turf, now  we  going  one  step  ahead  even  more  with this  machine that  can  blow  and  sweep  leaves  and  snow  away  from  your  drive as  well  as  cut  the  grass  
There  is  even  a  gadget  that  on  making  from  the  robotic  mower  inventor  to  weed  the  garden.
But  qouting  from  the  inventor  it  doesn't  recognise weeds  and  plants  and  just  strims  at  ground  level.
So  Its  basicly  a  robotic  strimmer or  weed  wacker  that  our  cousin  from  the  states  like  to  call      
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Scientists propose ten policies to protect vital pollinators - Press Release - UEA

Scientists propose ten policies to protect vital pollinators - Press Release - UEA | Gardening | Scoop.it

Pesticide regulation, diversified farming systems and long-term monitoring are all ways governments can help to secure the future of pollinators such as bees, flies and wasps, according to scientists.




Via Mariaschnee
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Christian Allié's curator insight, November 27, 2016 12:31 PM
..........."""""""""""""""""""""...........
[...]
The ten suggested policies in full are:
Raise pesticide regulatory standards
Promote integrated pest management (IPM)
Include indirect and sublethal effects in GM crop risk assessments
Regulate movement of managed pollinators
Develop incentives, such as insurance schemes, to help farmers benefit from ecosystem services instead of agrochemicals Recognize pollination as an agricultural input in extension services
Support diversified farming systems
Conserve and restore “green infrastructure” (a network of habitats that pollinators can move between) in agricultural and urban landscapes
Develop long-term monitoring of pollinators and pollination
Fund participatory research on improving yields in organic, diversified, and ecologically intensified farming
[...]
Eric Larson's curator insight, November 28, 2016 9:38 AM
Pollinator protection?
Eben Lenderking's curator insight, November 29, 2016 5:11 PM

Lo que tenemos que hacer para proteger los pollinizadores.  En Ingles.  What we need to do to protect the pollinators. 

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Back to Eden Organic Gardening 101 Method with Wood Chips VS Leaves Composting Garden Soil #2 | Gardening HQ

Back to Eden Organic Gardening 101 Method with Wood Chips VS Leaves Composting Garden Soil #2 | Gardening HQ | Gardening | Scoop.it
WHY IT WORKS . Part 2 of 12 Part Garden Series that will help you understand the PRO'S & CON'S of Back to Eden organic gardening 101 method with wood ..
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Caring for Our Soil Is Caring for Our Climate

Caring for Our Soil Is Caring for Our Climate | Gardening | Scoop.it
Globally, we're depleting the soil of significant amounts of carbon, but we can all contribute to reversing this process.
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Organic Gardening Tips | Planet Natural

Organic Gardening Tips | Planet Natural | Gardening | Scoop.it
We've put together 25 of our favorite organic gardening tips to help you grow a healthier, more productive garden. Enjoy!
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How to turn wood chips into a great compost heap | Alys Fowler

How to turn wood chips into a great compost heap | Alys Fowler | Gardening | Scoop.it
Take a leaf out of a French inventor’s book for a compost heap that’s cheap as chips
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This  is  a  fascinating  article  on  how  to  use  up  all  your   garden  rubbish.
Though  its  very  laborious My  best  advise  is  to  make  it  in  the  Autumn and forget  it  until  spring  that  way  the  chipping  would  have  totally  rotted  down.
The  big  mistake  I  have  seen  many  people  make  is  scatter  the  chipping  directly  on  the  ground  this  is  wrong  cause  the  chipping  acts  up  like  a  sponge  and  soaks  up  the  Nutriments  until  it  reaches  it  capacity  so  it  may  be  wise  to  mix  the  chipping  with  your  garden  compost  first   and  wait  till  it  fully  inoculated 
Another  thing  is  that    wood  chipping  contain  no  nutriments  only  carbon  if  you  think  about  it   all  the  food  has  done  to  the  roots  of  the  plants          
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Latest News | Global Plant Council

Latest News | Global Plant Council | Gardening | Scoop.it
The fungus Piriformospora indica colonizes the roots of different plants. This can be orchids, tobacco, barley or even moss. It penetrates into the roots, but does not damage the plants. On the contrary, it can even promote the growth of its plant partners. Such and other interactions between the fungus and its partners are already known to the scientific community.

Research groups from Cologne and Würzburg are now reporting a new facet of the fungus-plant relationship in Nature Communications: The researchers identified a protein with which the fungus suppresses the immune defence of the populated plants. So it makes sure that it is not attacked like disease-inducing fungi and the relationship can succeed in the long run.

The protein "Fungal Glucan Binding 1" (FGB1) prevents the plant from producing an "oxidative burst". This usually generates aggressive oxygen radicals, which destroy potential pathogens and activate the immune system of the plant.

Protein makes the plant blind to fungus structures
How does the protein lame the immune response of the plant? "It binds with highly affinity and very specifically to sugar molecules that sit in the cell wall of the fungi and which are normally recognized as 'foreign' by the plant," explains Professor of Molecular Biology Alga Zuccaro from the University of Cologne. FGB1 acts like a camouflage coat and conceals the foreign sugar molecules from the immune system.

Via Francis Martin
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fascinating  insight  into  the  world  of  plants  
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Get A Better Organic Garden With These Sensible Gardening Tips! | HistoricTreks

Get A Better Organic Garden With These Sensible Gardening Tips! | HistoricTreks | Gardening | Scoop.it
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Here  is  excellent  advice  on  how  to  start  your  own  organic  garden
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Top Tips for Converting Your Garden into an Eco-Friendly Paradise - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Top Tips for Converting Your Garden into an Eco-Friendly Paradise - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Gardening | Scoop.it
A beautiful garden provides many different things. It can be a safe play area for the kids. It is a quiet retreat on a sunny day. It is a peaceful place to
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PlantNetwork analysis reveals gardener average salary range

PlantNetwork analysis reveals gardener average salary range | Gardening | Scoop.it
PlantNetwork analysis reveals gardener average salary range - from Horticulture Week
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Why I think this report is  so  wrong  
To me, I  think  that like any other report  or  survey   that  is  done. They  don't look  at  other  pictures  and  variables that  influence  the  price  of  labour  especially  if  you  are  self  employed.
Though  We  all  like  to  own  more.  The  factor  quoting The  Rolling  Stones  " is  we  dont  always  get  what  we  wont  "
especially  if  you  work  from  home like  I  do  where  you  have  to  consider  these  two  factors.
(1)  Is  your  location  affluent   if  it  is  you  could  try  charging  that  amount. and  see  what  happens.
But  in  some  cases  we  are  less  fortunate and  probably  only  people  hiring  for  you  the  hr  but  expecting  more  in  the  bargain.
Or  in  some  cases no  work  at  all  
Which  brings  me  to  
(2)  What  the  demographic  of  your  area  are  they  old  and  retired  people  if  so  that  price  will  be  too  much  for  them  Or  are  you  living  in  a  young  area  where  there might  be  a  chance.  Even  their they  expect  your  work  for  2hrs  or  more  and  give  your  best   
(3)  Also  the  report  forget  to  think  that  to  include  the  living  wage  which  is  set  standard  for  Amenity   personal  
For  people  like  Me you  got  think  along  the  line  expenses  too  as  overheads  so  add  that  to  the  basic  living  wage   you  have  got  a  total  
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My WWOOFing experience was a nightmare. Here’s why the organization needs to change.

My WWOOFing experience was a nightmare. Here’s why the organization needs to change. | Gardening | Scoop.it
Many volunteers are driven to leave their host farms earlier than planned, yet it’s extremely rare to see a negative comment about a farm that would warn a future volunteer away.
Richard Spencer's insight:
This  is  an  excellent  article  on  the  latest  trend  down  under  and  just  may  be  the  way  forward  in  the  BREXIT  climate   especially  with  reports from  the   farmers  saying  that   their  labour  force  for  harvesting  is  dwindling.
But  without  getting  into  politics  I  have  read  it  very  much  a  double  edged  sword  cause  of  reports  that its  actually  poor  pay  to begin  with  is  that  causing  the  exodus  with  the  factor  of  the  exchange  rate  
Which  brings  to  my  mind  a  quote  from  Sir  Richard  Branson  "“Train people well enough so they can leave, treat them well enough so they don't want to.”"

Just  maybe  the  farmers  of  today  can  at  least  try  out  this  WWOOFing  and  see  how  it  goes .
There  is  nothing  to  pay  as  these people  are  volunteers  and  all  they  need  is  good  old  English  hospitality 
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