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Miniature Roses - Where To Plant Them? - www.garden-design.me

Miniature Roses - Where To Plant Them? - www.garden-design.me | Gardening | Scoop.it
Among the most charming and delightful of plants, miniature roses come in the same multitude of colors and varieties as their full size cousins. They're perfect for container gardens, but do just as well planted in the ground. Their small buds and blooms are beautiful in corsages and arrangements, tucked into a small vase on …

Via Eva Mushroom
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Sidetrack

Sidetrack | Gardening | Scoop.it
LAST STRAW: Gardening expert Melinda Myers offers this piece, titled “Create a garden anywhere with straw bales.”
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is a  excellent  guide  to  this  new  trend  that  sweeping  the  states  by  storm.  Hay  bales  growing.
What  it  entails  is  simple  preping   large  bales  of  hay  with   wet  concentate  of  nitrogen  fertilizer  at  first  to  start  the  composting  process.
A  good  example  of  this  is  too  use  any  spring  and  summer  lawn  feed   ant  too  thoroughly  wet  the  hay  so  the  fertilizer  can  dissolve   -  But  make  sure  you   it  a  pure   feed  only   as  the  weed  killer  and  the  moss  killer  will  defeat  the  object  
Good  ones  too  used  is    dried  blood  believe  it  or  not    then  just  follow  the  guide   
The  only  thing  I  have  against  it  here   is  that  it  can  be  terribly  costly  
(1)  Over  in  the  UK  we don't  have  this  ample  supply  of  Hay   and  what  we  do  have  goes  back  to  the  farm  to  produce  fodder  and  bedding  for  the  animals  
And  the  cost  of  buying  hay  bales/Straw  bales  is  expensive   one  
(2)  Preparing  the  bales  too  is  too  Me  too   Time  consuming  having  to  plan  it  a  two  weeks  in  advance  to  try  it  out  
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A Simple Way to Reduce Stress

A Simple Way to Reduce Stress | Gardening | Scoop.it
Gardening is one of the simplest way to reduce stress. It also reduces symptoms of attention fatigue, improves mental health and well-being, and more.
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  an  Excellent  follow  up  article  from  my  previous  post  on  the  benefits  of  gardening.
Being  a  gardener  my  self  I  have  found  that  seeing  a  job  completed  after  a  hard  days  work  is  must  rewarding  thinf  to  Me,as  well  as  seeing  the  clients  face  light  up  afterwards  is  priceless  which  seem  to  make  you  forget  that  you  you  have  done  your  back  in  the  process    
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How to Plant in Pots | Planet Natural

How to Plant in Pots | Planet Natural | Gardening | Scoop.it
By planting in pots, buckets, whiskey barrels, grow bags, or whatever else you find around the house, you'll be adding aesthetic interest and practicality to your yard and home.
Richard Spencer's insight:
You  may  think that  there  isn't  much  to know  about  potting  u  plants .
Since  you  been  doing  for  decades  and  your  patents  before  you    - But  think  again  and  read  this  article  and  you  will  change  your  mind  in  what  I  call  "  I  Didn't  know  that  moment "
Covers  every  thing  from  basic  potting  up  to  lighting  requirement   
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An Indoor Winter Herb Garden

An Indoor Winter Herb Garden | Gardening | Scoop.it
Keep eating healthful fresh herbs throughout the colder months with this advice for indoor success with culinary herbs.
Richard Spencer's insight:
How  to  start  a  Indoor   an  all  year  round    Herb  garden  

This  is  an  excellent  idea  for  all  you  herb  enthusiast   when  the  cold  has  killed  off  your  crop  outside  why  not  grow  them  in  inside  as  well
Though  this  article  specified  winter  you  can  do  this  all  year  round  if  you  wish  
Very Easy  to  follow  instruction     
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She Collects Plastic Forks And Sticks Them Upright In Her Garden. The Reason Why Is Genius

She Collects Plastic Forks And Sticks Them Upright In Her Garden. The Reason Why Is Genius | Gardening | Scoop.it
Ah, gardening! This age-old pastime is an all-around winner; it is said that the hobby relieves stress, the resulting greenery can really brighten up you
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  are  just  a  few  clever  gardening  hacks  to  use.
Some  are  good  some  are  just gone too  far  for  My  taste.
I  don't  know  abut  you  
But  I  like  the   reusing  old  cans  as  plant  pots -  but  I'm  concerned  about  the  water  and  rusting  from  the  inside  
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Starting Plants Indoors From Seeds

Starting Plants Indoors From Seeds | Gardening | Scoop.it

Many flowers and vegetables may be started from seeds indoors. Vigorous plants started indoors flower sooner and produce an earlier harvest than plants started outdoors.


Via Ron Wolford, Eric Larson
Richard Spencer's insight:
Starting  seeds  in  doors  
When sowing  seeds  this  a  excellent  guide  extensive  guide   -  seeds only  two  things.
(1) Warmth  
(2)  Moisture 
This  is  because  at  the  early  stages  of  development the  seed  coating needs  to  break  down until  the  first  petiole  break  through  the soil.
Hence  that  why  the  soil  needs  to   loose  for  the  roots  to develop 
Then  when  its  develop its  third  leaf  it  should  be  repotted  until  it  ready  to  be  planted  out 
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Ron Wolford's curator insight, April 6, 2:00 PM
University of Missouri Extension
Maria E Araiza-Gutiérrez's curator insight, April 6, 5:22 PM
I

It's that time of the year! 
 
Eric Larson's curator insight, April 11, 11:51 AM
Less expensive than buying flats.
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All About Soil

All About Soil | Gardening | Scoop.it
A healthy soil translates into a healthy garden. But before you begin adding compost, manure, fertilizer, lime, and other soil amendments, you need to know what type of soil you have and its properties.
Richard Spencer's insight:
I don't  know  if  you  read  my  latest blog  https://spencerrichard01.wordpress.com/ where  I  put  it  in its  a  simple  laymans  form  of  infographic  for  you .
But  if  you  request more  detail  than  this  site   gives  it  in  bucket  loads.
I have  took My  knowledge  from  what  I  have  studied  at  school   to  my  horticultural  training. 
I  don't  claim  to  be  geologist  or  a  soil  scientist  but  when  it  comes  to  gardening  it  a  matter  or  thinning  out  the  wheat  from  the  chaff  to  know  what  is  needed  especially  when  your  amateur.
That  Is  why  I  use  graphics  that  are  easily  understand   and according  to  physiologist you  brain  can  absorb  more  information  that  way .

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Lois DeVries on the Transformational Power of Gardening

Lois DeVries on the Transformational Power of Gardening | Gardening | Scoop.it
The future of mental health interview series continues with Lois DeVries on the transformational power of gardening.
Richard Spencer's insight:
#ShareTheOrange 
A  another  fascinating  insight  into  the  roll   gardening  plays  on  mental  health  by  relieving  stress   
But this  time  from  the  experts  in  their  field  
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Gardening with Kids: How It Affects Your Child's Brain, Body and Soul

Gardening with Kids: How It Affects Your Child's Brain, Body and Soul | Gardening | Scoop.it
Planting a garden can affect not only your child's body but also their brain and soul.
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  a  great  follow  up  from  the  article  i  posted earlier  on today. http://sco.lt/5ZuMFN .
But  this  time  the  article  goes  on  how  gardening  can  benefit  the  young  adults  by  improving  their  health  and  general awareness  of  the  world  they  live  in.
My  self  I  have  no  off  spring   of  mine   but  proof  has  shown  that  in  nature  young  children  like  to  copy  their   parents  as  a  process  of  early  learning


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Spring garden clean up done RIGHT - Savvy Gardening

Spring garden clean up done RIGHT - Savvy Gardening | Gardening | Scoop.it
Now that spring is near, many of us are anxious to clean up our gardens. But, a good spring garden clean up should NOT be a destructive process.
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  a  excelent  guide  on  how  to  look  after  your  beneficial  insects in  the  spring  by  just  waiting  till  they  come  out  of  hibernation.
Saw  my  very  first  lady  bug  yesterday  among the  stems  of  a  Fushia  bush  that  i  was  cutting  down  for  a  client.
With  the  weather  being  so  mild  of  late  they  hadn't  really  hibernated  at  all  
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20 Easy and Effective DIY Tricks for Gardening

20 Easy and Effective DIY Tricks for Gardening | Gardening | Scoop.it
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With  the  up  and  coming  big  events  in this  year  calendar  coming  up.Being  firstly  the  Ideal Home  up  in  olympia   then  Chelsea  and  Hampton Court.
I  found  this guide  rather  interesting  and  practical though  i  wouldn't  go  use  them  my  self      
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  Learning and Growing with Nursery Elementary

  Learning and Growing with Nursery Elementary | Gardening | Scoop.it
Young  adults  not  only  learn  about   gardening   skills  but   the  valuable  experience  about  lives  disappointments  too    
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  we  have  young  adults  not  only  learning  about  gardening  skills  but  about  life  disappointments  at  very  early  age  -  Gardening   isn't   all  about  being  the  best  at  the  fare  its  about  learning  too  and how  you  deal  with  it  so  you  don't  make  the  same  mistake  again.
  
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Q Lawns - Lawn Blog - How to stop your dog destroying your lawn - Q Lawns

Q Lawns - Lawn Blog - How to stop your dog destroying your lawn - Q Lawns | Gardening | Scoop.it
How to prevent man's best friend from becoming your lawn's worst enemy?
Richard Spencer's insight:
Good  sound  advice  here  from  Q  lawns  as  Many  of  us  own  pets.
Unfortunately  dogs  like  to  create  havoc  in  garden  as  well  your  lawn  and  like  burying  their  bones.
So  my  best  advice  is  to  mould  your  garden  around  your  pets   
here  is  a  great  collection  of  material  to  help  you  do  that  - http://list.ly/list/SoN-how-to-make-a-dog-friendly-garden  
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Permaculture: You've Heard of It, But What the Heck Is It? - Modern Farmer

Permaculture: You've Heard of It, But What the Heck Is It? - Modern Farmer | Gardening | Scoop.it
Not catching the drift? You’re not alone. Is permaculture a gardening technique or a special approach to farming, like biodynamics? Is it some type of back-to-the-land, off-the-grid intentional community? Is it about sustainable architecture, aquaponics, philosophy, horticulture, design? Permaculture is all that and then some, which is why it’s so hard for anyone to capture what it means in one neat sentence.

Via The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California
Richard Spencer's insight:
Permaculture 
"Not  catching  the  drift  then  your  not  alone "
Then  this  article  here  by  Modern  farmer   should  clear  things  up  better  hopefully .
With  all  these  new  trends  coming  across  the  sea  its  very  hard  to   catch  up  on  what  staying  and  what  is  just  a  fad   these  days 
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Eric Larson's curator insight, May 1, 8:52 AM
Permaculture explained?
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What is Vertical Gardening?

What is Vertical Gardening? | Gardening | Scoop.it
Make the most of your garden space with vertical gardening: Grow delicious vegetables and fruits and colorful flowers up on a trellis, on garden netting, in a tower of pots, and over garden structures, while enjoying the benefits of easier maintenance, healthier plants, effortless harvesting, and higher yields.
Richard Spencer's insight:
T
T
I
A
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The  only  way  is  up 
This  to  Me  is  a  great  idea where  you  just  don't  have  enough  space  in  your  tiny  yard .
Is  to  grow them  upwards.
As  the  comments  have  said  besure  to  get  vine  climbing  varieties  of  Tomatoes  not  bush  type   though.
You  can  achieve  the  same  effect  with   grow bags  and  a  post  on  a  A  frame  design.
Then  drop  down  a  netting  or  even  twine  from  the  top    and  train  the  plant  upwards   until  it  reaches  the  utimate  hieght  then  pinch  it  out 
 
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How to choose the right potting compost for your plants

How to choose the right potting compost for your plants | Gardening | Scoop.it
What is the difference between bags of compost at the garden centre? Which compost should I use in pots? Here's my guide to potting compost
Richard Spencer's insight:
How to choose the  perfect   Compost  

This  is  an  excellent  guide  if  you  are  in  quandry  about  what  compost  to  use .
As  the  term  potting  compost  is  just  for  potting.

When  starting  any  plants  from  seed  they  need  very  little  nutriments  to  start  off  with.
You  can  virtually  start  the  seeds  in  wet  paper  cloth  -  Infact  there  are  some  firms  that  have  seed  mats   that  you  just  simply  lay  down  and  water.
Or  the  seeds  are  covered  in a  gel  and  you  simply  use  a  devise  similar  to  icing  a  cake.
Thats  how  simple  it  is  too  start  them  off  as  they  only  need  moisture  and  warmth  to  start  their  journey.

When  the  plants  reach  their  second  leaf  stage  then  they  should  be  transplanted  into  their  pots  with seed  compost  or  just  multi  purpose  compost  
until  the  plant  either  is  ready  to  be  transplanted  out  side  or  has  out  grown  the  pot  

However  they  are  several  important  things  to  remember  is 
(1) that  compost  has  very  little  short  use  by  date  about  a  month  ounce  opened  so  if  you  will  need  to  feed  it  after  that  or  just  top  it  with  fresh  compost.

(2)  Peat and  coir based  compost  will  have  to  be  really  soaked  well  with  a  fine  rose   afterwards  other  wise  the  compost  will  just  crack  and  the  water  will  just  drain  away  To  prevent  this  from  happening  you  place  your  pot  in  a  bucket  of  water  and  leave  it  until  the  you  can  see  the  water  on  top.
Then  let  it  drain  back  into  the  reservoir  
This  method  can  be  applied  with  seeds  also  but  presoak  the  compost  first  
then  lay  the  seeds  on  top  and  depending  on  their  size  sieve  the  remaining  compost  on  top  and  then  press  it  down  and  give  it  a  gentle  watering  

(3)  As  Peat  is  gradually  to  be  phrased  out  now  and  "Peat  Free  alternatives  which  often  contain  either  coir  or  plant  bi  products  like  bark  ect   where more  watering  is  needed  to  provide  healthy  plant  growth  

For  more  indepth  articles  on  peat  aternatives  check  out  



      
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Major hotel chain to grow vegetables at 1000 properties to cut food waste

Major hotel chain to grow vegetables at 1000 properties to cut food waste | Gardening | Scoop.it
The group’s restaurants will reduce the number of main courses on offer and record all food that is thrown away

Via Soil Association, Eric Larson
Richard Spencer's insight:
Major    hotel  food  chains  to  grow  there  own  vegetables.

  To  me  this  is  a  great  step  forward  in  combating  food  waste.
Along  with  the retailers  and  supper  markets who  are  encouraged  to  sell  deformed  produce  as  well at  a  cheaper  price  
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Eric Larson's curator insight, April 13, 5:12 AM
Reduce food waste by raising vegetables on site?
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7 essential tools to make your gardening life really easy

7 essential tools to make your gardening life really easy | Gardening | Scoop.it
The Middle Sized Garden blog has been rattling round my head ever since we moved into a house with, well, a middle-sized garden, which was before blogs were really invented.
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  are  Mine  top  7 list   basic  garden tools that  you  need  in  the  garden  -  what's    yours ?

(1)  First  an  foremost  a  good  hoe  -  I  prefer  a  dutch  a  hoe  my  self  with  a  sharp  edge to  slice  through  the  weeds.
When  using  a  hoe  its  best  to  hoe  with  a  slant  to  sever as  much  of  the  root  as  you  can.
(2)  good  garden  forks  - border  forks  are  ideal  just  for  that  as  their  counter parts  the  border  spades.
The  use  of  these   forks  that  designed  to  relieve  back   problems  are  just  to  heavy  for  me  and  cumblesum.
The  same  with  the  Spades  Im  afraid  I  tried  them  ounce  and  that  was  it  for  me.
For  heavy  work  I  choose  the  big  spades    and  forks    to  do  the  job  but  be  careful  that  it  doesn't  break   or  even  bend  at  the  tip.
As  I  found  one  cheap  one  does  
(3)  With  hand  trowels  I  have  always  used  my  favourite  one  which  was  a  freebie  and  made  of  harden  rubber  -  this  didn't  bend  or  break  and  did  the  job  well  as  many  cast  iron  one  do  these   days  
Hand  forks   are  must  the  same  I  prefer  the  flattened  tines  to  the  ones  in  the  picture
(4)  With  Secateurs  and  loppers  -  since  I  use  them  a  lot  in  my  trade  I  go  for  good  quality  anvil  ones     that  last  a  longer  time 
Because  buying  cheap   and  often  is  a  false  economy 
Also  on  my  list  is  pruning  saws  and Bow  Saws  for  the  tough  jobs  cause  forcing  the  loppers  to  cut  a  large  branch  will  only  damage  the  blades  
(5)  a  good  quality   budding  knife  is  a  god  sends  when  you  cutting  string  or  twine   for  support  of  plants .
Wire  cutters  even  for  those  that  prefer   the  garden  wire  to  the  string  as  using  the  secateurs  will  get  blunt  when  using  them  
(6)  refuse  bags  and  bag  opener   to  keep  the  bags  open  whilst  weeding  saves  you  labour  and  time  
(7)  Shovel  and  Brush  to  finish  off  and  tidy  up    your  beds  
  
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Gardening For Beginners : Who Said You Needed A Lot of Space?

Gardening For Beginners : Who Said You Needed A Lot of Space? | Gardening | Scoop.it
Square foot gardening is the practice of dividing the growing area into small square sections (typically 12' on a side, hence the name). The aim is to assist the planning and creating of small but intensively planted vegetablegarden. It results in a simple and orderly gardening system, from which it draws much of its appeal. The major criticism of SFG is that it packs the plants too close together, which inhibits root development, and thus water and nutritional uptake suffers resulting in stunted plants. Mel Bartholomew coined the term 'square foot gardening' in his 1981 book of the sam
Richard Spencer's insight:
How to grow anything in  restricted  area  

Many  of us  are  less  fortunate  than  must  and  have  very  little space  to  grow  anything  but  crops.
But  don't  let  that  deter  you  THINK  OUT SIDE  THE  BOX   
here  are  two  ways  that  you  can  still  have  your  vegetable  garden.
Another method is use grow bags  and  support  and grow  your  crops  like  Tomatoes  and  Beans    vertically  like  this  article  said or  to  use  the  raised  beds 
Big  sturdy  clay  pots  also  come  in  handy  too  I  have  very  good  results  from  using  these  on  a  clients  tomatoes  -  but  when  using   clay  all  ways  water  well  as  most  of  water  is  either  evaporated  from out  from  the  clay  itself   leaving  it  dry  
To  test  the pot  for  water  all  you  need  is  a  stick  to  give  it  a  gentle  bang  on  the  side  -  if  it  sounds  hollow  then  it  time  to  water  
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Are young people really 'hooked on gardening'?

Are young people really 'hooked on gardening'? | Gardening | Scoop.it
A survey suggests that far from being addicted to their smartphones, 25-35
year olds are rolling up their sleeves and getting in the garden
Richard Spencer's insight:
I am  so  glad  to  see  this  but  some  how  there  is  still  a  down  trend  in  the  Industry.
As  many  take  up  jobs  in  the  city  for  better  pay  
Oh  yes  my  rant  again  but  alas  that's  all  we  can  do unless the three  wise  monkeys  in  the  government   take  action  
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Small Garden Ideas's curator insight, March 28, 12:43 AM
I am  so  glad  to  see  this  but  some  how  there  is  still  a  down  trend  in  the  Industry.
As  many  take  up  jobs  in  the  city  for  better  pay  
Oh  yes  my  rant  again  but  alas  that's  all  we  can  do unless the three  wise  monkeys  in  the  government   take  action  
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Thieves targeting rare plants prompt botanical gardens to beef up security

Thieves targeting rare plants prompt botanical gardens to beef up security | Gardening | Scoop.it
Britain's most spectacular botanical gardens have been forced to beef up their security as green fingered thieves target valuable rare plants. The worrying phenomenon has dramatically increased in recent years, forcing attractions including the Royal Horticultural Society's garden at Wisley, Surrey, and the Royal Botanic Gardens in both Kew and Edinburgh to assess security and install extra CCTV. Experts fear that rare plants such as orchids from Asia and South America are being stolen to order for collectors or sold on the black market, where they can fetch up to several hundred pounds each. Certain snowdrops worth up to £100 each are a common target and the recent theft of a variety known as Galanthus Mighty Atom from Wisley was branded “appalling”. "People know exactly what they're stealing. They are knowledgeable. They are undoubtedly collectors which is quite disappointing, sad, frustrating and annoying." David Knott, curator Matthew Pottage, the garden’s curator, said that such theft used to be reserved to "just the odd plant" but had now become a serious concern. He told Horticulture Week magazine: "The theft of plants at Wisley has increased in frequency over the past three years to around 10-15 plants a year. "The thefts have included woody and alpine plants, perennials and bulbs and have focused on some of the more unusual cultivars. “It is very upsetting for the team who treasure our collections. "We will be stepping up measures to stop this unsavoury activity and we will not let it dilute the excellent diversity of our plant collections." Mr Pottage said all thefts were reported to the police and that the RHS was “vigorously” looking at ways to combat the problem. Plant crime has become big business with more than 30,000 plants registered as being endangered, some of which would sell for thousands. In 2014, the world’s smallest water lily, a Nymphaea thermarum, which is smaller than a pound coin, was stolen from the Princess of Wales Conservatory at Kew. The plant, which is extinct in the wild, has never been recovered and may well have died. A Kew spokesperson said: "We regard any theft as a serious matter. We have recently put in place additional electronic surveillance to augment the existing coverage." • Alan Titchmarsh: how to beat a green-fingered thief In 2013, the Sir Harold Hillier Gardens in Hampshire had so many rare snowdrops stolen that they began keeping them on limited display. The gardens also lost a rare species of mahonia within a week of putting it on display and a rare illicium henryi Star of Anise bush which originates from western China. The overnight thefts prompted the installation of a high wire boundary fence and motion cameras in newly planted areas. Meanwhile at Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens in Dorset, thieves are believed to have dug up newly planted, valuable banksia plants in 2014, snipping off their stems and stealing the roots before replacing the stalks to cover their tracks. Good bye named snowdrops!More #planttheft @RHSWisley. Just appalling. If you visit us, please help by being vigilant pic.twitter.com/xBSXektXaB — Matthew Pottage (@Matthew_Pottage) February 27, 2016 David Knott, curator of the Rotal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, said they had experienced theft on a similar scale to Wisley. "As a public botanic garden with open access we have a huge degree of trust and people are quite clever,” he said. "People know exactly what they're stealing. They are knowledgeable. They are undoubtedly collectors which is quite disappointing, sad, frustrating and annoying. "It's easy to disguise a theft so it's not immediately obvious. "Snowdrops are an obvious target when in flower as material available for propagation. "With the scale of our plant collection, we can't monitor constantly. "My key message is that we are cultivating plants for wider public enjoyment and removing pieces does detract and spoil it for others.” It is an offence to under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 to intentionally uproot any wild plant without permission though there are concerns this is rarely enforced. There are also strict international laws preventing the movement of certain plants and flowers such as orchids, without special certification, to prevent poachers picking them to extinction.
Richard Spencer's insight:
This  is  great  follow  up  article  from  the  one  I  recently  curated  http://bit.ly/1LwD5HI  about  the  plight  of  exotic  plants  that are taken  by theives  in  Ireland.
Though  its  a  just  a  story   and  the  reality  of  it  is  nothing  compared  to  the  this  article  in  yesterday  Telegraph.
The  news  is  just  as  shocking.
The  amount  of  resources  that  it  takes  to  keep  these  alive   is  phenomenal.
The  only way  to  beat  it  is  beef  up  security  at  these  places  like  airports   and  that  will  cost  us  a  fortune  in  taxes.
Or  altenatives  be  vigiliant  and  report  anything  that  you 'believe  to  suspicious  in  the  markets  in  the  case  of  these  plants  being  sold  illegaly.
Or  in  the  case  of  suspicious  behavour  to  the  right  authorities  in  this  case  members  of  staff   who  will  call  the  police  in if  necessary   
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Should More Children Be Introduced to Gardening?

Should More Children Be Introduced to Gardening? | Gardening | Scoop.it
Is gardening another basic skill headed toward extinction?
Richard Spencer's insight:
W
I
A
A
B

While  this   story  here  gave  me  and  many  others  a  chuckle  about  the  innocents  of  youth.
It  brings  back  the  stark  reminder  that  a part  from  playing  on  their   laptop  playstation  ect.  Children  shoud  learn  about  gardening  on  the  hands  approach  from  growing  and  harvesting  to  appreciate  the  value  of  food  more.
As  I  was  growing  up  in   South  East  London  I  helped  my  father  attend  his  big  vegatable  garden  right  upto  when  he  pasted  away.
And  had  never  regretted  it.
But  in  those  days  they  wasn't  such  thing  a  laptops   iphones  etc  we  had  to  make  our  entertainment  and  mine  was  gardening 
 
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High intensity and demanding New York still has places of peace - GardenDrum

High intensity and demanding New York still has places of peace - GardenDrum | Gardening | Scoop.it
New York is high intensity: selfish, demanding, fast and furious but there are green spaces that are peaceful, nurturing, reflective and, ultimately, humane
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  one  great  story  taken  from  My  paper.li  which  you  can  subscribe  to  here  http://eepurl.com/3PyIr   if  you  wish  
It  takes  you  step  by  step  through  what  you  thought  of  being  the  most  busiest  cities  in  America  ie  New York  to  its  must  tranquil  haven  of  Central  Park  where  you  can  hear  the  birds  sing.
Most  of  you  who  either   have  been  there  are  lived  there  will  relate  to  this  tale  but  the for some  of  us  that  hasn't   the  pictures  and  description  in  this  article  sums  it  all  it  up 
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Guest Blogger Di Stapley tells us why she DOESN’T work in Horticulture!

Guest Blogger Di Stapley tells us why she DOESN’T work in Horticulture! | Gardening | Scoop.it
Ok, I confess!  I don't actually work in the horticultural industry. I fell into an IT career and it pays very well, so I have no plans to change direction.  But you never know what's around the corner, right? I've always loved growing stuff right from being a tiny kid.  I can remember helping my…
Richard Spencer's insight:
As  I  mentioned  in  the  comments,  I  have  been  in  this  Industry  for  over  20  years  now,  and since  I  now  at  the  age  where  im  too  old  learn new  tricks  I  guess  Im  stuck  with  it  untill  I  no  longer  can  do  it.
But  this problem  isn't  new  its been  on  going  for  at  least  5  yrs  I  recall, and  yet  it  hasn't  been  addressed  properly  just  reviewed  and  swept  under  the  proverbial  carpet.
The  main  problem  lies  in  what  one  horticultural  professional  body  called  #PlantBlindness  where  either general  public  and  the  government  haven't  recognised  that  no   matter  what  field  you  are  in   you  are  classified  as  Blue  collar  worker   and  paid  the  living  wage.
Which  to  make  up  for  a  descent  payout  we  have  to  work  overtime.
Do  do  what  we  do  we  all  had  to  go  to  day  release  course  to  gain  our  grade . Like  I  did  working  up  towards  to   a  skilled  gardener  (E  grade  )  Then  Groundsmen  Courses    whilst  I  working   for  the  Local  Authority  until  I   left  to  work  for  the  Royal  Parks  department  up  in  London   where  I    studied  for  My  City  and  guilds.all  this  and  more  you  can  read  on  my  linkedin profile  page  https://uk.linkedin.com/in/rsgardencareservices
I  digress  we  are  trained  professionals  just  because  some  of  us  don't  have  titles  at the  end  of  our  name to  be  recognised  doesn't  mean  we  are  qualified.
Another  problem  is  education   (well  in  my  day  anyway )  Horticulure/gardening   wasn't  even  included  in  any  curriculum or  career  advise  as  i  already  mentioned     
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Should you be overseeding your lawn this spring? 

Should you be overseeding your lawn this spring?  | Gardening | Scoop.it
As spring is fast approaching, should you be overseeding your lawn? Learn 4 important aspects you must consider.
Richard Spencer's insight:
As  Spring  draws for  ever  closer.
This  question no  matter  where  you  are  is  on  your  lips.
"When  is  the  best  time  to  reseed  your  lawn?"
In  My opinion  in  the  late  fall  is  the  best  time  to  get  maximum  germination.
Here  is why  
(1)  There  is  less  competition  with  the  weeds  and  birds  that  would  other wise  feasting  on the  seeds  -  thus  cutting  down  your  cost  
(2) This  gives  the  seeds  more  of  chance  to  set  up  root  system   as  they  is  less  competition producing  a  healthy  sward  
(3) The  ground  should  be  warm  enough  to   produce  germination  
As  for  Aeration  I  agree  with  this  article  here  but  before  you  rush out  and  hire  a  aerator    read  this  article  here  first  https://spencerrichard01.wordpress.com/2015/03/19/a-for-aeration/  
You  should  also  scarify  your  lawn  too  before  overseeding  that  why is  it  important  also  to over  seed  in  the  autumn   over  wise  the  moss  will  just  take  over  and  you  are  left  with  a  green  but  spongy  lawn.
If  you  missed  out  on  the  Autumn regime the  best  time  is  in  the  April  when  the  ground  is  warm  and  wet  and  rain  predicted  other  wise  you  have  to  water  water . In  the  parts  of   the  world  like  America  with  their  water  restrictions  this  isn't  practical  and  some  times  illegal           
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