Gardening
3.4K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Richard Spencer from Gardening in the City
onto Gardening
Scoop.it!

Self watering vertical garden with recycled water bottles

Self watering vertical garden with recycled water bottles | Gardening | Scoop.it
Here how i made my vertical vegetable garden, starting from used big water bottles as planters. An automatic watering system keep the right moisture, ...

Via Kimberley Hopkins, Ethni-City Gardens
more...
Ethni-City Gardens's curator insight, July 1, 2013 12:32 PM

What a great idea, this would work very well for beginning gardeners.

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Council plants trees in middle of football pitch and won't remove them

Council plants trees in middle of football pitch and won't remove them | Gardening | Scoop.it
A council has apologised after planting trees in the middle of a football pitch — but said it would not immediately remove the new plants. Residents of Logie Durno, in Aberdeenshire, turned up for a kickabout at the local playing field to discover a copse of young fruit trees had been planted on the pitch.
Richard Spencer's insight:
This  article  doesn't  surprise  me  at  all.
After  working  for  13  years  for a  borough  council  who  will  be  named  less.  I  have  experienced  several  of  these fails first  hand  from  the  management  level.
The  one  that  brings  to  mind  is  planting  a   trees  along  side  path,with  out  doing  their  homework  on where  the  original  path  ends. 
According  to  this  article  this  is  what  looked  like  just  happened.
Surely  the  park  staff  management  saw  the  goal  post  and  thought  hold  on  this  isn't  right.
In  this  day and  age  council  cut  backs  according  to  the  parliamentary report  last  week   the  areas   first  to  be  thinned  will  have  to  be  management  and  not  the  workers  after  all  the  park  staff  where  only  following  orders  from  above    
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

How to winter prune wisteria

How to winter prune wisteria | Gardening | Scoop.it
A weekend project for.
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  an  excellent  guide  on  how  to  prune  your  wisteria  by  the  @Telegraph.
The  golden  rule  I  was  doing  my  RHS   was  that  they  need  to  pruned  twice  in  one  year  to  promote  good  healthy  growth and  in  the  age  of  Health  and  Safety  which  many  people  seem  to  forget  its  best  to  be  insured  for  public  liability  when  dealing  with  houses  and    ladders   as  you  do  not  know  what  hidden  wires  are  lurking  in-between  the   vine  or  tangled  up  and  in  case  of  the  ladder  breaking  the  window  or  even  worse  you  falling  you  are  covered.
Of  course  the  down  side  is  that  with  that  premium  comes  the  extra  cost.
Some  clients  will  turn  you  down   and  get  some  inexperienced    to  do  it   ~  Good  For  them  
But  I  rather  be  safe  than  sorry.
Back  on  to  the  Wisteria  as  I  mentioned  already  before  they  will  need  to  pruned  twice   Jan  to  Feb     and  again  July  to  August  
Here  is  an  excellent  video   By  the  RHS  on  how  to  prune  your  wisteria  https://www.rhs.org.uk/videos/advice/pruning-wisteria ;
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Learn about the 6 best houseplants you can grow in the bathroom

Learn about the 6 best houseplants you can grow in the bathroom | Gardening | Scoop.it
Learn about the 6 best houseplants you can grow in the bathroom with the requirements and basic care needed!
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  an  awesome  article  taken  from  My  paperli  pubication  Top #Gardening  Cover  stories  ~  http://po.st/Paperli  .
About  how  to  choose  the  best  plants  for  your  bath  room.
My  guess  would  be  choose a  plant  that  grown  in  the  tropics  that  can  tolerate ;- 
(1)  High  Humidity
(2)  Low  Light 
Whilst  I  am  on  the  topic  of  Low  Light   have  you  read/seen  the  article  in  Digg.com  about  the  simple  test  you  can  do  to  check  out  the  light  intensity  http://po.st/Qt6DKZ ;
   
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

How To Grow Tomato Plants In Buckets

How To Grow Tomato Plants In Buckets | Gardening | Scoop.it
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  an  awesome  Taken  from   paper.li  publication ~ http://po.st/Paperli _ On  how  to grow   Tomatoes  using  perforated  buckets,pvc  and  drip  feeds.
The  only  thing  I  have  against  this  method  is  that   only  suitable  for  bush  tomatoes as  the  others  require  staking  and  the  weight  will  surely  topple  the  containers  
And  for  them  to  effective  the  stakes  need to  be  in  the  ground  
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Creative By Design Landscaping
Scoop.it!

Spring gardening checklist for your Calgary home.

Spring gardening checklist for your Calgary home. | Gardening | Scoop.it
its time to start thinking about gardening. The snow will soon be gone and the lawn and garden beds will need attention. Here's our Spring Checklist
Richard Spencer's insight:
This  article  here  gives you  the  a  brief  idea  of  what  jobs  are  todo  in  the   spring  as  it  approaches  slowly  around  the  corner.
It  also  time  to  do  a  stock  check  on  your  garden  and  see  what  has  worked  and  what  hasn't  and  to  think  what   would  look  better.
As for the  lawns  the  mild  early  months   leading  up  to    mid  December has  played  hell  with  the  lawn  as  it  encouraged   Moss  and    fungus  to  grow.
My  best  advise  is  too  leave  the  feeding  it  until  April  and  let  it  recover  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Is this family's front garden the most dangerous in Britain?

Is this family's front garden the most dangerous in Britain? | Gardening | Scoop.it
Hannah and Ian Jones from Grimsby have had it with vehicles smashing into their front garden. It was hit three times in the space of 20 minutes bringing the total number of collisions to six.
Richard Spencer's insight:
The  dangers  of  black  ice  and  speeding  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Honey fungus

Honey fungus | Gardening | Scoop.it
Autumn is the season for mushrooms, the fruiting bodies of fungi that
appear suddenly in our gardens at this time of year, along with morning
mists and the smell of woodsmoke. An integral part of our environment fungi
play an essential role within the ecosystem, converting dead material into
nutrients required for plant growth. However, in the quasi-naturalistic
setting of the garden, not all fungi are created equal. There are
relatively harmless saphrophytic fungi, which live on dead or decaying
organic matter, and aid the process of decomposition. These perform a vital
function and one which, from a gardener’s perspective, is relatively
benign. There are also beneficial micorrhizal fungi which form a
codependnent relationship with the roots of plants, assisting in the uptake
of nutrients from the soil in exchange for sugars and carbohydrates. But
there are also pathogenic fungi, which are rather more of a nuisance,
possessing as they do a penchant for living material.

Two weeks ago, several patches of cinnamon hued mushrooms, each with a
darker central spot on the cap, appeared in one of my regular gardens. This
was not an auspicious start to the day, as these mushrooms bore a marked
resemblance to one of the three signs of the armillaria group of fungi,
also known as honey fungus. Armillaria is a virulent pathogenic genus –
recognised by the RHS as ‘the most destructive fungal disease in UK
gardens’ – which invades the roots of trees and woody perennials, weakening
the plant and then consuming the decaying organic matter. The cap of the
mushroom is convex at first, like a shallow dome or half a tea cake, but as
it ages the outer edges curve upwards, revealing the gills beneath. While
the mushrooms do not necessarily appear each year the presence of honey
fungus is also suggested by a sheet of white fungal growth beneath the bark
at the base of the infected plant, and by the characteristic black
rhizomorphs, or ‘bootlaces’, by means of which the organism can spread long
distances through the soil. The mushrooms in this garden were concentrated
around the decaying remains of some old shrubs, on which both the white
mycelial sheet (which smells very noticeably of mushrooms) and the
beginnings of the bootlaces were evident. Finding the fruiting bodies, with
their characteristic colouring, was a fairly good indicator of what was now
lurking in the lawns and borders. Finding all three signs together removed
any remaining vestiges of doubt. Honey fungus, I was now confident, had
arrived.

To put things in perspective, it is reputedly the case that the largest
living organism is a kind of honey fungus,  Armillaria ostoyae, which
covers an  area larger than 2,000 acres in a forest in Oregon. No wonder
that I wasn’t overjoyed to see its relative manifesting in these Kentish
grounds.

A pair of mature birch trees dominate this garden (there had originally
been three, but one had to be felled last year when I noticed a rotten hole
had developed at the base of one – mentioned in a blog post here), and one
of the newly planted borders near a particularly fine crop of mushrooms
features a Magnolia 'George Henry Kern', Viburnum tinus, and Hydrangea
'Annabelle'. I couldn’t have created a more sumptuous menu for the honey
fungus had I tried – all of these appear on the list of plants particularly
susceptible to this pathogen, so we shall have to keep an eye out for signs
of stress, by which time it may well be too late. I would prefer where
possible to lift the plants and containerise them in the same position with
some artful planting to hide the containers, a plan that’s presently in
negotiation. The first step was to dig out all the infected rotten wood –
stumps and roots were well decayed by now and offered little resistance to
the trusty mattock – and as much soil as possible, all of which was bound
for the bonfire. The chemical control for this was banned for use as a
garden herbicide in 2003, so physical destruction (burning) of infected
material is the only legal option at present. The legislation wasn’t able
to prevent me from disinfecting my tools with Jeyes Fluid before moving on
to other areas of the garden, a sensible precaution to take.

The next step is to have a reputable tree surgeon inspect the remaining
birch trees for signs of infection, particularly as the root and stump of
their departed companion resembles at present some kind of mushroom
gourmand’s fantasy. These trees are too tall and close to the house, and
the garden too exposed and windy, to countenance any chance of structural
weakness.

Should the worst transpire, we will have to look to more resistant plants –
a list of which is available here – to replace those that might succumb too
easily to this voracious fungus. For now, we’re pairing the measures we’ve
already taken to all the optimism we can muster, and hoping it won’t come
to that.

Tthe beginnnings of blue black ‘bootlace’ rhizomorphs in the middle of this
rotten stump
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  fascinating  article  about  the  scourge  of every garden -  Honey  fungus.
Due  to  this mild  weather  we  had  up to now it  brought  on  a  lot of  fungi  spores  about.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Walliser: Here are 5 houseplants that thrive in low light

Walliser: Here are 5 houseplants that thrive in low light | Gardening | Scoop.it
If you've struggled to grow houseplants in the past due to having low light conditions in your home, you may want to give them
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Putting Compost on Wheels

Putting Compost on Wheels | Gardening | Scoop.it
Reclaimed Organics is closing the food loop, bringing food scraps from New York City back into the soil as compost for a community garden in the East Village.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Five Of Sri Lanka's Best Green Buildings

Five Of Sri Lanka's Best Green Buildings | Gardening | Scoop.it
Humans have constructed buildings since the New Stone Age, starting with simple structures built for shelter using natural materials. For many centuries later, the construction of buildings was almost one with nature, using rocks, rubble, and naturally occurring substances, until the Iron Age, when
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Best Gifts for Gardeners of All Ages

Best Gifts for Gardeners of All Ages | Gardening | Scoop.it
One-stop shopping for gardening & garden related gifts to fit every budget and season. Written by an avid organic gardener featuring products we use. Perfect for Mothers & Fathers Day, Christmas,etc.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Garden Tower 2: 50-Plant Composting Container Garden

Garden Tower 2: 50-Plant Composting Container Garden | Gardening | Scoop.it
Purchase the composting 50 plant senior accessible vertical Garden Tower for organic patio vegetable gardening by Garden Tower Project.
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  a  ideal  gift  suitable  for  everywhere, Kitchens conservatory  etc  where  you  can  grow  strawberries   
1
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Conflict at Kew Gardens grows with the funding gap

Conflict at Kew Gardens grows with the funding gap | Gardening | Scoop.it
Internal problems and a budget crisis at Kew threaten its reputation as the
world's number one botanic institution, writes Tim Richardson
Richard Spencer's insight:
Though  this  is  very  sad  news to  hear    it  is  not  altogether  new .
As  an  article  from   the  BBC   on  March  4th  last  year  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-31715081  
has  pointed  out  that  their  funding   was  short   quoting  " financial black hole £5.5m a year"  and  even  the  year  after  that  https://www.theguardian.com/science/2014/dec/17/kew-gardens-job-losses-budget-scientists    
So  it  seems  to  Me  that  they  are  on  a  down  spiral   unless  the  government  steps  in  or  the  Heritage  Fund  and  pulls  it  out  of  the  rabbit  hole    
 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Gardening 101: New Zealand Flax: Gardenista

Gardening 101: New Zealand Flax: Gardenista | Gardening | Scoop.it
Richard Spencer's insight:


This  is  one  of  My  favourite   architectural plants  for  a  LARGE GARDEN
With  the  emphasis  on  Large  as  it  can  virtually  take  over  garden  as  it  gets  older  and  established,And  then  its  problem  to  dig  out  and  dispose  off  as its  rhizome  grow  on  top  of  each  other and  get  too  heavy  lift  with  age.
So  It  tends  to  be  plant  and  forget  type  of  plant  
   
This  story  and  many  more  can  be  found  in  my   weekly  publication  of  Top  #Gardening  cover  stories   ~  http;//po.st/Paperli  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

How to Take Care of Houseplants in the Winter: Our Top 10 Tips

How to Take Care of Houseplants in the Winter: Our Top 10 Tips | Gardening | Scoop.it
You're not the only one struggling to make it through the harshest months of the year—your houseplants are also busy dodging drafts and soaking up every last ray of dwindling sunlight. To give your ferns and fiddle leaf figs a fighting chance at survival, follow these ten tips for winter plant care (then keep your fingers crossed that spring comes early this year).
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is  another  excellent  article    taken  from  Paper.li  ~ http://po.st/Paperli  ~   from  the  people  at  @aparthmenttherapy   on  how  to  look  after  your  over  the  winter  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Florida Native Plants, Florida Plants Database, Landscaping and Gardening

Florida Native Plants, Florida Plants Database, Landscaping and Gardening | Gardening | Scoop.it
Learn about Florida Friendly landscaping and gardening, Florida native plants and lawn care.
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Creative By Design Landscaping
Scoop.it!

Landscaping in Marda Loop, Calgary - Quality and Unique

Landscaping in Marda Loop, Calgary - Quality and Unique | Gardening | Scoop.it
Contemporary meets Old Country in Marda Loop, Calgary. This contemporary home features multi-leveled landscaping to accommodate the many different grades.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Spencer from 1001 Gardens ideas !
Scoop.it!

How to Choose the Right Lawn Grasses

How to Choose the Right Lawn Grasses | Gardening | Scoop.it
An Overview of the Major Types of Lawn GrassesWhile selecting lawn grasses, you should go for those that thrive in the local climate and area conditions like sun or shade. Choose the most appropriate one keeping in mind the needs of the entire family, including pets, adults and children. There... http://bit.ly/2jmpx4W

Via Recyclart
Richard Spencer's insight:
Here  is excellent  article  aimed  at  the  #USA  Market  on  how  to  choose  the  perfect  turf  for  your  garden  by  1001gardens.org  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

How to Make a Holiday Wreath | Organic Gardening Blog

How to Make a Holiday Wreath | Organic Gardening Blog | Gardening | Scoop.it
For you crafty types...�� https://t.co/X3CYUa1QMW
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

My new robot friend Kobi loves to mow the lawn and plow snow

My new robot friend Kobi loves to mow the lawn and plow snow | Gardening | Scoop.it
Kobi is a modular robot that’s basically a Roomba for snow and leaves. It’ll mulch grass and leaves, throw snow into a dedicated area, and mow the lawn. You have to define its physica
Richard Spencer's insight:
As  2016  gardening  seasons  closes we  can  only  wonder  what  next  year  will  bring.
My  self  Ill  take  manageable  and  realistic  bite  size  in  forecasting.
But  will  the  future  hold  for  us  now  we  have  already  come  step  forward  technically  with robotic  mowers  and  Astro  turf, now  we  going  one  step  ahead  even  more  with this  machine that  can  blow  and  sweep  leaves  and  snow  away  from  your  drive as  well  as  cut  the  grass  
There  is  even  a  gadget  that  on  making  from  the  robotic  mower  inventor  to  weed  the  garden.
But  qouting  from  the  inventor  it  doesn't  recognise weeds  and  plants  and  just  strims  at  ground  level.
So  Its  basicly  a  robotic  strimmer or  weed  wacker  that  our  cousin  from  the  states  like  to  call      
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Richard Spencer from Gaia Diary
Scoop.it!

Scientists propose ten policies to protect vital pollinators - Press Release - UEA

Scientists propose ten policies to protect vital pollinators - Press Release - UEA | Gardening | Scoop.it

Pesticide regulation, diversified farming systems and long-term monitoring are all ways governments can help to secure the future of pollinators such as bees, flies and wasps, according to scientists.




Via Mariaschnee
more...
Christian Allié's curator insight, November 27, 2016 12:31 PM
..........."""""""""""""""""""""...........
[...]
The ten suggested policies in full are:
Raise pesticide regulatory standards
Promote integrated pest management (IPM)
Include indirect and sublethal effects in GM crop risk assessments
Regulate movement of managed pollinators
Develop incentives, such as insurance schemes, to help farmers benefit from ecosystem services instead of agrochemicals Recognize pollination as an agricultural input in extension services
Support diversified farming systems
Conserve and restore “green infrastructure” (a network of habitats that pollinators can move between) in agricultural and urban landscapes
Develop long-term monitoring of pollinators and pollination
Fund participatory research on improving yields in organic, diversified, and ecologically intensified farming
[...]
Eric Larson's curator insight, November 28, 2016 9:38 AM
Pollinator protection?
Eben Lenderking's curator insight, November 29, 2016 5:11 PM

Lo que tenemos que hacer para proteger los pollinizadores.  En Ingles.  What we need to do to protect the pollinators. 

Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Back to Eden Organic Gardening 101 Method with Wood Chips VS Leaves Composting Garden Soil #2 | Gardening HQ

Back to Eden Organic Gardening 101 Method with Wood Chips VS Leaves Composting Garden Soil #2 | Gardening HQ | Gardening | Scoop.it
WHY IT WORKS . Part 2 of 12 Part Garden Series that will help you understand the PRO'S & CON'S of Back to Eden organic gardening 101 method with wood ..
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Caring for Our Soil Is Caring for Our Climate

Caring for Our Soil Is Caring for Our Climate | Gardening | Scoop.it
Globally, we're depleting the soil of significant amounts of carbon, but we can all contribute to reversing this process.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

Organic Gardening Tips | Planet Natural

Organic Gardening Tips | Planet Natural | Gardening | Scoop.it
We've put together 25 of our favorite organic gardening tips to help you grow a healthier, more productive garden. Enjoy!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Richard Spencer
Scoop.it!

How to turn wood chips into a great compost heap | Alys Fowler

How to turn wood chips into a great compost heap | Alys Fowler | Gardening | Scoop.it
Take a leaf out of a French inventor’s book for a compost heap that’s cheap as chips
Richard Spencer's insight:
This  is  a  fascinating  article  on  how  to  use  up  all  your   garden  rubbish.
Though  its  very  laborious My  best  advise  is  to  make  it  in  the  Autumn and forget  it  until  spring  that  way  the  chipping  would  have  totally  rotted  down.
The  big  mistake  I  have  seen  many  people  make  is  scatter  the  chipping  directly  on  the  ground  this  is  wrong  cause  the  chipping  acts  up  like  a  sponge  and  soaks  up  the  Nutriments  until  it  reaches  it  capacity  so  it  may  be  wise  to  mix  the  chipping  with  your  garden  compost  first   and  wait  till  it  fully  inoculated 
Another  thing  is  that    wood  chipping  contain  no  nutriments  only  carbon  if  you  think  about  it   all  the  food  has  done  to  the  roots  of  the  plants          
more...
No comment yet.