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Anyone Can Grow Herbs With This Super-Helpful Chart

Anyone Can Grow Herbs With This Super-Helpful Chart | Gardening | Scoop.it
This will be the year you finally get it right.
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Planning A Companion Vegetable Garden

Planning A Companion Vegetable Garden | Gardening | Scoop.it
Companion vegetable plants can help each other when planted near each other. Creating a companion vegetable garden will allow you to take advantage of these beneficial relationships. Click here for more.
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Watering Guidlines for Germinating Seeds

Watering Guidlines for Germinating Seeds | Gardening | Scoop.it
Seeds have to absorb moisture from the time they are sown until they germinate and emerge from the soil, so the seedbed must be evenly and constantly moist throughout this period.

WATER NEEDS FOR SMALL SEEDS The tiny seeds- carrots, celery and most of the cabbage family - are all planted about 1/4 inch deep . Their seedbeds need to be constantly moist at least 1 inch down. This may require a light a light watering once a day or, in dry periods , twice even three times a day. Until they have developed a minimal root system, small seeded shallow-rooted seedlings like these remain very sensitive to moisture deficiencies near the soil surface . For a week after emergence , so that no more than the top 1/4 inch of the soil is dry.


PROVIDING FOR LARGE SEEDS Although beans, and peas and other large-seeded plants are sown deeper at 1 inch or more, their seeds are larger and the therefore have to absorb a lot more water. They'll tolerate some dryness right at the soil surface but do best if their seedbed stays evenly moist during the entire germination period. Now is the worst time to skimp on water, and extra attention will pay dividends later on . Plants get off to the best start if germination happens as fast as it can. A germination process that drags on itself a form of stress. If soil temperature is appropriate, germination problems are usually caused by insufficient soil moisture . In rainy periods, you may not need to water, but check to make sure the rain is penetrating deeply enough to reach the seeds. After the seedling emerges, keep the soil moist to at least 2 inches deep for the first week.

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Controlling Horn Worms In Your Garden

Controlling Horn Worms In Your Garden | Gardening | Scoop.it
Horn worms are large, ominous-looking insects that love to feed on tobacco and tomatoe-family crops.Horn worms are large, ominous-looking
insects that love to feed on tobacco and tomato-family crops. They can
grow up to 5 inches long and have a "horn" on one end. The horn won't
sting you, but these insects can devour the foliage of tomatoes,
nicotiana, moon-flowers, potatoes, eggplants, and peppers. There are two
common horn worms: tomato and tobacco. They look similar except for some
striping and coloring, and both love any plant in the Solanaceous
family.The adult horn worm is a large, brown hawk moth that lays eggs on the
undersides of leaves. Some call them hummingbird moths because they flit
around the garden, enjoying the nectar from many flowers. After the
eggs hatch, the green larvae begin to consume leaves, and sometimes
green fruits, at an alarming rate. The caterpillars eat and grow for
three to four weeks before pupating in the soil. In Southern regions
there may be two generations a year, while in the North there is usually
only one.Because of their size and appetite, horn worms can quickly strip the
foliage off branches. You usually see the damage before you see the
insects because their coloring camouflages them well. If you catch them
early enough, little permanent damage will be done to your plants. You
can control these voracious eaters by handpicking individual
caterpillars and dropping them in a pail of soapy water or feeding them
to chickens. For large infestations, spray Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki.
This organic biological spray can be found under the name of Dipel or
Thuricide. It is the same spray you'd use on cabbage worms, and it is
safe for pets, kids, and the environment. However, it kills all larvae
in this family of insects, including swallowtail butterfly larvae, so be
careful where you spray it in the garden. If you see a horn worm with
white egg sacks on its back, leave that horn worm in the garden. The egg
sacks are from the braconid wasp, which will parasite and kill
horn worms in your garden.
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Sow A Salad Garden

Sow A Salad Garden | Gardening | Scoop.it
Imagine the crunch of crispy lettuce and cucumbers the tangy of fresh tomato, the bite of a green onion. Hungry yet? If you are then you know that a salad of a garden- fresh vegetables that you have grown yourself is beyond comparison.
You do not have to have a huge space or a lot time to reap satisfying salad rewards. A 3x6 foot bed can keep you in salad fixings for months. By using high yielding vegetables and intensive planting techniques you can harvest almost 50 pounds of produce from such a small space! How To Build A Bed



A raised bed garden is perfect for a salad garden because it will provide the optimum growing conditions necessary for intensively planted little patch
.Pick Your Plants:Let your palate be your guide in choosing what you would like to grow in your salad garden. Divide your bed into 6 squares of the same size . (approximately 18 x 24 inches each). Something similar to this image.In each square, plug in a different salad veggie. Here are some suggestions for crops to start in spring as well as ideas for what to plant in its space when it is finished. You may also want to plant edible flowers around the perimeter of the salad patch for a pretty, and tasty, garnish. onions followed by kalesweet bell peppertomato, followed by spinachRadishes, followed by cucumbers, then lettuce or onionsSpinach, followed by pepperscarrotslettuce, followed by beetslettuce, followed by chard
Edible flowers :
NasturtiumsSquash blossomsPansiesChivesBorageLavenderEase Through The Season:To push cool-loving crops like lettuce and spinach into summer, shield them with shade cloth. Available at most garden centers, the fabric covering allows just enough light to pass through to promote health growth, while filtering out the sun's strongest rays. You may also consider planting a summer salad garden in a lightly shaded area, or let some lettuces grow in the shade of taller plants such as tomato. Keep It Working:By planting a salad garden in a compact area, it will be easy to tend. Keep your crops well watered to promote robust growth . Weeding should be a snap. Because plants are spaced so closely , weeds will have a hard time getting a foothold. Any that do sprout will be easy to see and remove. Harvest crops as soon as they are ready, and often as possible. This will encourage the vegetables to produce more. As soon as one vegetable is finished , remove it and next crop in the ground. By never letting the bed go idle, you can reap big yields from such a small space.
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Save money  $1.49 head . When you can grow many heads for very little. 

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Sow A Salad Garden

Sow A Salad Garden | Gardening | Scoop.it
Imagine the crunch of crispy lettuce and cucumbers the tangy of fresh tomato, the bite of a green onion. Hungry yet? If you are then you know that a salad of a garden- fresh vegetables that you have grown yourself is beyond comparison.
You do not have to have a huge space or a lot time to reap satisfying salad rewards. A 3x6 foot bed can keep you in salad fixings for months. By using high yielding vegetables and intensive planting techniques you can harvest almost 50 pounds of produce from such a small space! How To Build A Bed



A raised bed garden is perfect for a salad garden because it will provide the optimum growing conditions necessary for intensively planted little patch
.Pick Your Plants:Let your palate be your guide in choosing what you would like to grow in your salad garden. Divide your bed into 6 squares of the same size . (approximately 18 x 24 inches each). Something similar to this image.In each square, plug in a different salad veggie. Here are some suggestions for crops to start in spring as well as ideas for what to plant in its space when it is finished. You may also want to plant edible flowers around the perimeter of the salad patch for a pretty, and tasty, garnish. onions followed by kalesweet bell peppertomato, followed by spinachRadishes, followed by cucumbers, then lettuce or onionsSpinach, followed by pepperscarrotslettuce, followed by beetslettuce, followed by chard
Edible flowers :
NasturtiumsSquash blossomsPansiesChivesBorageLavenderEase Through The Season:To push cool-loving crops like lettuce and spinach into summer, shield them with shade cloth. Available at most garden centers, the fabric covering allows just enough light to pass through to promote health growth, while filtering out the sun's strongest rays. You may also consider planting a summer salad garden in a lightly shaded area, or let some lettuces grow in the shade of taller plants such as tomato. Keep It Working:By planting a salad garden in a compact area, it will be easy to tend. Keep your crops well watered to promote robust growth . Weeding should be a snap. Because plants are spaced so closely , weeds will have a hard time getting a foothold. Any that do sprout will be easy to see and remove. Harvest crops as soon as they are ready, and often as possible. This will encourage the vegetables to produce more. As soon as one vegetable is finished , remove it and next crop in the ground. By never letting the bed go idle, you can reap big yields from such a small space.
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Can You Prune Cabbage: Information On Pruning Cabbage Leaves

Can You Prune Cabbage: Information On Pruning Cabbage Leaves | Gardening | Scoop.it
As with any garden crop, cabbage is prone to some issues. Perhaps the leaves are on the ground and beginning to rot or hanging over other crops. So what to do? The answer would be in pruning the cabbage leaves, but can you prune cabbage? Find out here.
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Succession Planting 4 Ways, for More Vegetables

Succession Planting 4 Ways, for More Vegetables | Gardening | Scoop.it
Succession planting in vegetable gardening is a way to extend your harvest by either staggering your plantings or planting varieties with staggered maturing dates. Here's how it works.
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Vegetable Family Crop Rotation Guide: Understanding Different Vegetable Families

Vegetable Family Crop Rotation Guide: Understanding Different Vegetable Families | Gardening | Scoop.it
Crop rotation is a common practice in the home garden, giving vegetable familyspecific diseases time to die out before replanting into the same area. For tips on plant families, this article will help.
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Tips for Growing Your Own Herbs - DIY Inspired

Tips for Growing Your Own Herbs - DIY Inspired | Gardening | Scoop.it
Ten helpful tips for growing your own herbs indoors.
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Ready to transform your vegetable garden to organic? Gardening writer Tom ... - Press Herald

Ready to transform your vegetable garden to organic? Gardening writer Tom ... - Press Herald | Gardening | Scoop.it
You'll need items from compost to cages, from barrels to broadforks.
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Gardening calendar: support climbers and sow parsnips

Gardening calendar: support climbers and sow parsnips | Gardening | Scoop.it
The gardening tasks for the week ahead including spring cleaning outdoor furniture
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Improving a new garden

If you've just moved home, chances are you're on a tight budget - but how do you make a start on the new garden with just the basics?
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Are bees getting dementia? - CNN.com

Are bees getting dementia? - CNN.com | Gardening | Scoop.it
A new study suggests aluminum may be causing dementia in bees and leading researchers to wonder if it's contributing to the declining bee population.
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Edible Gardening Made Easy

Edible Gardening Made Easy | Gardening | Scoop.it
Want your own vegetable garden to nurture? Love to grow fruit and vegetables, but haven’t a clue where to start? Then this is course for you.
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3 Effective, All-Natural Ways To Eliminate Weeds

3 Effective, All-Natural Ways To Eliminate Weeds | Gardening | Scoop.it

Weeds are the arch enemies of gardeners. You may notice a seedling here and there at first, but if left untreated, these seemingly harmless plants will overtake your garden. Why is this a problem? Well, aside from their messy appearance, weeds sap valuable nutrients from the soil -- nutrients that can be used for other plants. The good news is that you eliminate weeds and regain control of your garden by using one of the methods listed below.Spray Them With VinegarVinegar has hundreds of different uses, one of which is to kill unwanted weeds. The next time you notice a weed trying to poke its head through your soil, try spraying it with the strongest vinegar you can find (usually 6% concentration). This all-natural solution works to kill plants (and weeds) by literally eating through them.Distilled white vinegar has a pH of 2.4, which makes it a pretty strong acid. Any weeds exposed to this solution will almost certainly die, and if they happen to survive the first round, continue spraying them each day until they shrivel up and die. It's important to note that apple cider vinegar is slightly less acid, so stick with the distilled white variety when treating your garden for weeds.Pour Boiling Water on ThemWeed killing sprays, powders and other chemical-ridden products often cost a fortune. Before wasting your hard-earned money on products such as these, try killing your weeds with good old fashioned H2O. Granted, regular room-temperature water won't do the trick. You need to bring the water to a piping-hot boil and then pour it over the weed. Boiling water will kill practically any microorganism it touches, but it will also kill weeds. Just remember to use caution when pouring, as it can leave some pretty painful burns if any of it splashes on your skin.Here are some tips on how to kill weeds using boiling water:
Boil your water in kettle to maintain its hot temperature.When transporting the kettle to your garden, wear a pair of insulated oven mitts.Skip the shorts and wear long pants to protect your legs from any boiling water.Pour the boiling water just 2-3 inches above the weed to prevent splashing.Pull 'Em Up!If you look at the gardening aisle of your local home improvement store, you'll find special handheld tools designed to pull up weeds. Rightfully known as weed pullers, they have several forked hooks at the tip which are used to pull the weed out of the soil. If you don't have one already, buy a weed puller so you can eliminate these pesky little nuisance plants when you first see them. Pulling up weeds while they are still young will prevent them from reproducing and spreading.

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Heirloom Seeds vs. Hybrid vs. GMO Infographic

What is Heirloom?Heirloom seeds are produced after two of the same parent plants are openly pollinated. The child plants that are created from heirloom seeds most often show the same characteristics as the parent plant. As of today, there is still no concrete definition of what heirloom seeds. For example, some state that heirloom seeds are those that were introduced before the 1920s while others state that they are those introduced before 1951. A definition that is generally accepted though is the fact that heirloom seeds are those that can be regrown and passed on from one generation to the next.There have been many questions on whether heirloom seeds are organic or non-organic. In most cases, heirloom seeds are organic because they tend to be only used by gardeners who maintain small-scale gardens and farms. There may be some minor cases, however, when heirloom seeds could be non-organic. For example, a few gardeners may resort to using pesticide or other forms of chemical to treat heirloom plants that don’t offer the same level of natural protection as hybrid plants do against things like pests and diseases. When you look for heirloom seeds, make sure the provider clearly states that the seeds are organic as well.Heirloom vs. Hybrid vs. GMOAnother common question asked by gardeners is about the differences between heirloom, hybrid, and GMO plants. As mentioned earlier, heirlooms are those that pass on the same characteristics from generation to generation. Gardeners refer to this as breeding true. Hybrid and GMO, on the other hand, do not breed true. Hybrid plants can offer different levels of traits per generation because the genetic information of two different plant varieties involved. For example, if the first generation of hybrid plants produces flowers that are pink, there is no guarantee that the second generation of plants will produce flowers with the same shade of color. GMO plants, meanwhile, are sterile. This means that people who use GMO seeds have to buy new seeds every year from the companies that provide them.Why Grow Heirloom SeedsAlthough hybrid and GMO plants do offer great benefits, there are certain aspects of heirloom seeds that make them more beneficial over the long-term. For example, heirloom plants, in general, are known to be more flavorful than hybrid plants. They are also known to contain more nutrition. Last but not least, they are cheaper to use over the long-term. It is also important to understand that you are playing an important role in preserving the genetic diversity of plantsWhere to Find Heirloom SeedsHeirloom seeds can be found in many places. For example, if you are looking to obtain them locally then you can check out places like botanical gardens, local farms, and seed exchanges. Otherwise, there are many great websites online that provide organic heirloom seeds. When you shop around online, make sure you look for the Safe Seed Pledge, which is a good sign that the company is providing non-GMO products. Most of the popular heirloom seed companies have already made their pledge.information provided by : http://www.organiclesson.com/heirloom-seeds-vs-hybrid-vs-gmo-infographic/
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Easy Crop Rotation for Your Garden

Easy Crop Rotation for Your Garden | Gardening | Scoop.it
Source: Fix.com
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Learn more with this infomercial on easy crop rotation for your vegetable garden.

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Benefits Of Cinnamon On Plants: Using Cinnamon For Pests, Cuttings, & Fungicide

Benefits Of Cinnamon On Plants: Using Cinnamon For Pests, Cuttings, & Fungicide | Gardening | Scoop.it
Cinnamon is a wonderful flavor addition to cookies, cakes, and any number of other foods, but to gardeners, it's so much more. Read this article to learn more about using cinnamon in gardens.
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How can cinnamon help in the garden?

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Tips on Gardening With Heirloom Seeds

Tips on Gardening With Heirloom Seeds | Gardening | Scoop.it
Whether you're an avid green thumb with decades of experience under your belt, or if you're looking to start your very first garden, you can't go wrong with heirloom seeds. Unlike traditional seeds sold at most major plant nurseries and retailers, these beauties have inherited the positive traits from multiple generations. Of course, there are a few things you should know before digging up the dirt and planning an heirloom seed.What The Heck is an Heirloom Seed?Let's first go over the basics of heirloom seeds, as many people are likely hearing about them for the first time just now. The term “heirloom seed” is used to describe the seed from a plant that has been passed down through multiple generations, during which the plant has been given extra care because of its high value. It's a fitting term considering the fact that heirlooms are also passed down from one generation to the next.Start SmallThere's nothing wrong with wanting to grow a large heirloom garden full of vibrant and delicious vegetables, but it's usually best to start small and gradually work your way up. If you encounter any problems, you can fix mitigate the damage so it doesn't ruin your entire garden.Plant Hardiness ZoneWhen choosing an heirloom seed, pay close attention to the variety of plant and whether or not it's suitable for your particular climate. The good news is that most heirloom plants are stronger and more resilient to fluctuating temperatures than standard plants. The bad news is that extreme cold snaps can still injure or kill an otherwise healthy heirloom plant. I recommend using the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Zone Map, which reveals the average annual extreme minimum temperatures throughout the country. This will give you a good idea on whether or not a particular heirloom plant will survive in your garden.Beware of PestsThere's nothing more frustrating than investing your time and energy into growing an heirloom plant, only for it to be devoured by pests. To prevent this from happening, identify potential pests and your garden and make the necessary changes to ward them off. If you have a problem with aphids, for instance, you can try releasing a couple hundred ladybugs in your garden. Ladybugs prey on aphids and other small pests, making them particularly useful in situations such as this. Ideally, you should stick with all-natural pest control solutions rather than chemical-based pesticides.These are just a few tips to follow when growing heirloom plants. Above all else, though, keep a close eye on your plants, providing them with the necessary sunlight, water and nutrients.
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Should I Foliar Feed My Plants? and more Organic Gardening Q&A

John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ answers your organic gardening questions. Help John to close caption his videos and get your questions ...
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Encourage bees into your garden with these extremely useful tips

Encourage bees into your garden with these extremely useful tips | Gardening | Scoop.it
Bees are vital pollinators of many flowers, plants and fruit, help your garden by helping them
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Tips for Growing Your Own Herbs - DIY Inspired

Tips for Growing Your Own Herbs - DIY Inspired | Gardening | Scoop.it
Ten helpful tips for growing your own herbs indoors.
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Useful Garden Ideas » Follow This Advice To Learn More About Organic Gardening

Useful Garden Ideas » Follow This Advice To Learn More About Organic Gardening | Gardening | Scoop.it
RT @101Gardening: Follow This Advice To Learn More About Organic Gardening - http://t.co/ANlWblbtIn
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Use Epsom Salt for Larger, Sweeter Garden Yield - Home and Garden Digest

Use Epsom Salt for Larger, Sweeter Garden Yield - Home and Garden Digest | Gardening | Scoop.it
Epsom salt is such an important ingredient in gardening that you should buy large bags. It's useful for growing larger, sweeter tomatoes and peppers, improving fruit production,
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