Garden Spot
Follow
4.3K views | +6 today
Rescooped by PlasmaBorneElectric from Organic Farming
onto Garden Spot
Scoop.it!

The good farmer: An expert in relationships and sustainability

The good farmer: An expert in relationships and sustainability | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
There is a view of farmers that I believe seriously undervalues their value, in the bigger scheme of things. I’ve thought this for a long time. It goes back to my early years living on my late Dad’s farm. He grew crops and raised pigs for market. Yet; he was also a German Jewish intellectual, an immigrant to Canada, via Kenya and UK, part of the WWII Diaspora, and brought his world view to our small farm, and local community, in Southern Ontario. A recent TED presentation caught my attention. It, too, touches on farming, and tells the story of a fish farm in southern Spain, and a farmer named Miguel; a farm where relationships between species, land, and location are explored and nurtured, in ways I think might have made my Dad smile. The story of Veta la Palama Veta la Palama is a fish farm in southern Spain, located in an island in an estuary 16 kilometres from the Atlantic Ocean. Tides sweep in estuary water, which a pumping station distributes throughout the farm’s 45 ponds. Because it comes directly from the ocean, that water teems with microalgae and tiny translucent shrimp, which provide natural food for the fish that Veta la Palma raises. Veta la Palma produces 1,200 tonnes of sea bass, bream, red mullet and shrimp each year. The land also acts as the largest private bird sanctuary in Europe; including flamingos that travel in the morning to feast on shrimp at the farm, and return the same day, to their brooding ground 150 miles away! 20% of fish and fish eggs are lost to birds each year, and this is good, says the farm’s biologist Miguel Medialdea. We farm extensively, not intensively. This is an ecological network. The flamingos eat the shrimp. The shrimp eat the phytoplankton. So the pinker the (flamingo) belly, the better the system. Veta la Palma provides an alternative to the more common agribusiness model; i.e., high on capital, chemistry, machines, and questionable-tasting food! Dan Barber is a New York chef, scholar, conservation advocate, and influential voice on agricultural policy. In this engaging TED talk last month, titled How I fell in love with a fish, Barber is clear about his preferred way forward. What’s to like about Veta la Palma Barber’s optimism is a statement for farmers (and their farms): that aren’t worlds unto themselves; rather they are part of the larger life network that restore instead of deplete; letting nature be nature e.g., impurities in the water are naturally filtered out that farm extensively instead of just intensively; diversity is healthy that measure their success by the success of predators; all things are connected! that are not just producers, but experts in relationships; systems thinkers that produce good tasting food (where do I sign up?) that flow with an ecological model; one that relies on two billion years of on-the-job experience that show us another way positive way to collaborate, to work together, and move forward Look to the farmer as a barometer of healthy community. I do, in my community. Some questions Veta la Palma is owned by a major Spanish food conglomerate Hisaparroz. Like many conglomerates, there are aspects of the empire that don’t fit so nicely into the sustainability model e.g., genetic engineering. How to reconcile this paradox? Where is sustainability positioned in our list of priorities? (thinking of my posts about my local fair trade coffee distributor and my experience with fish farmers in the Philippines) Do foreclosures in the American outer suburbs represent farming opportunities? How does extensive farming integrate with intensive urban farming? How can we create conditions that enable every community to feed itself? What about in my own community?
Via Giri Kumar
more...
No comment yet.
Garden Spot
A place of news and views for atheist gardeners and gardeners in general. Eco-friendly news & views, around the homestead advice, tips and tricks, plus a whole lot more independent homestead living..
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Amazon.com: Terracotta Garden Tower - The Composting 50 Plant Organic Container Garden: Patio, Lawn & Garden

Terracotta Garden Tower - The Composting 50 Plant Organic Container Garden

Product by Garden Tower Project More about this product
Price: $319.99
You Save: $32.99 (10%)
Find the biggest selection of products from Garden Tower Project with the lowest prices. Shop online for mowers, grills, garden tools, generators, snow blowers and more at Amazon.com
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Ken Meter: Building A Local Food Economy (part 1 of 3) - YouTube

For more Stories, Food News, and Cooking Fresh videos, visit: http://cookingupastory.com As the pendulum has swung toward a globalized economy, more people a...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Homegrown Health & Independence

Homegrown Health & Independence | Garden Spot | Scoop.it

We throw many vegetables away that can be regrown over and over. We are enjoying while onion greens we bought at the store. My wife cut the greens and used them and saved me the white bottom part with the roots. I planted them in a planter containers and placed them on our south facing dining room windows. 

 

We've been enjoying white onion greens all winter. I'm now going to move them outside for the summer and if they are still producing I'll bring them back inside for the winter. 

 

Fresh healthy produce that we know how it is grown, what's been put on it and guaranteed to be organic, not just called organic. The term organic is almost meaningless when we buy in the supermarket from Agribusinesses. It's that way on purpose. Buyer Beware is their motto. 

 

btw, the Agribusiness Corporations who sell us GMO foods unlabelled and call toxic produce "organic" are the same Corporations Teabagging Right Wing Politicians want us to trust with our economy and our lives. You know, the same private Corporations we the public bailed out in 2008.

 

Thankfully these teabagger Right Wing supportings are eating the toxic slug at the private Corporate grocery store and the private Corporate fast slugs places. They're drinking the fracking water and breathing the toxic air. 

 

We can mitigate private Corporate toxins by growing our own food and staying healthy enough to fight the pollution. We can drill our own water wells. We can learn what wild plants are safe and effective to forage. We can build communities of independent sovereign individuals that share talents and skills with each other. 

 

An added advantage to growing your own food is the seeds cost pennies or you can save and exchange seeds. More so is the knowing every food you produce yourself is tax free produce!! That expensive grocery store bill also comes with a sales tax. Food you grow for pennies doesn't include no sales tax.

 

Small game hunting is a worthwhile endeavor as well as small livestock raised at your home. This also allows children to realize food is alive. Ham comes from a once live pig. Hamburger comes from a once live cow. Carrots, Apples and corn come from living plants.

 

All this lost to our modern world needlessly. We have technology and knowledge that makes it so easy to raise, harvest and prepare our food from plants and animals. It used to be a hard labor. Today it is easier and more better. 

 

Like anything else you learn to do it also gets easier the more you do it. Gardening, Homesteading, Small Game Hunting and Foraging is healthy and connects us to ourselves, each other and brings us closer to nature.

 

That's a very good thing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Seven Food Labeling Tricks Exposed | RCScience

Seven Food Labeling Tricks Exposed | RCScience | Garden Spot | Scoop.it

Editor's Note: This article was originally published at The Conversation.


If you’re confused by food labels, you’re not alone. But don’t hold your breath for an at-a-glance food labelling system that tells you how much salt, fat and sugar each product contains.Australia’s proposed “health star rating” labelling scheme was put on hold in February,

following pressure from the food industry. And it’s unclear whether the scheme will go ahead.

 

Marketers use a variety of tricks to make foods seem healthier and more appealing than their competitors, particularly when it comes to products aimed at children. One of the most powerful advertising tools a food manufacturer has is the packaging, as it’s what we look at immediately before deciding which food to purchase.

 

Next time you’re shopping for food, look out for these seven common labelling tricks:

 

     –––––––click headline to read rest of article ––––––––––

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

P. Allen Smith Online Publications. Online ebook – Bonnie Plants

P. Allen Smith Online Publications. Online ebook – Bonnie Plants | Garden Spot | Scoop.it

Click thru this online ebook.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Savvy Housekeeping » Make Your Own Bacon

Savvy Housekeeping » Make Your Own Bacon | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
Wordpress, Blogs
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants: Douglas W. Tallamy, Rick Darke: Kindle Store

Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants - Kindle edition by Douglas W. Tallamy, Rick Darke. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by PlasmaBorneElectric from Crafts and DIY
Scoop.it!

Make Your Own Homemade Carpet Freshener

Make Your Own Homemade Carpet Freshener | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
I have been using Homemade Carpet Freshener for years.  So, today I decided to include it on my blog.  Whenever I make carpet freshener, I will sometimes

Via Sharon Futrell-Hodge
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Editorial: Last Calendar Day of Frost in My Area..

Editorial: Last Calendar Day of Frost in My Area.. | Garden Spot | Scoop.it

Tomorrow, April 11, is the supposed last calendar day of frost in my area. Now do I begin moving plants outside? Weathers been wanky..

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Sweet Potato Breakfast Skillet | Civilized Caveman Cooking Creations

Sweet Potato Breakfast Skillet | Civilized Caveman Cooking Creations | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
A simple and delicious sweet potato breakfast skillet made in one pan for breakfast, lunch or dinner
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Recipes for Families | Spoonful

Recipes for Families | Spoonful | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
Explore delicious new recipes to feed your family. Discover fun and easy ways to make breakfast, lunch, and dinner every day at Spoonful.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Pin by Jesse Pugh on Freedom for (& from) Idolatry | Pinterest

Pin by Jesse Pugh on Freedom for (& from) Idolatry | Pinterest | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
This Pin was discovered by Jesse Pugh. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Top 5 Ways to Prepare Your Garden for Spring

Top 5 Ways to Prepare Your Garden for Spring | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
Top 5 Ways to Prepare Your Garden for Spring - Are you ready for spring? Check out these 5 tips to see if you've done everything you need to do to be ready for…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Mexico dominates U.S. produce imports

Mexico dominates U.S. produce imports | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
Statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture show that Mexico by far is the most important supplier of fresh produce to the U.S., accounting for 69% of U.S. fresh vegetable import value and 37% of U.S. fresh fruit import value in 2012.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Chinese Douchi - Fermented Black Beans - 16 Oz Bag Each : Canned Black Beans : Grocery & Gourmet Food

Amazon.com : Chinese Douchi - Fermented Black Beans - 16 Oz Bag Each : Canned Black Beans : Grocery & Gourmet Food
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Red Clumping Bamboo - Monrovia - Red Clumping Bamboo

Red Clumping Bamboo - Monrovia - Red Clumping Bamboo | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
Monrovia's Red Clumping Bamboo details and information. Learn more about Monrovia plants and best practices for best possible plant performance.
PlasmaBorneElectric's insight:

Good to know and I'm always up to know good..

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Comparing Vermicomposting Methods – An Overview

Comparing Vermicomposting Methods – An Overview | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
If you are interested in trying your hand at vermicomposting, this article is for you. Discusses all the basics of vermicomposting for the beginner.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Evernote Food | Evernote

Evernote Food | Evernote | Garden Spot | Scoop.it

Remember the food you love. Find great new restaurants, document family recipes, discover, collect, and remember your life's memorable moments in food.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Vegetable Companion Planting Chart | Urban Farmer

Vegetable Companion Planting Chart | Urban Farmer | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
Recommendations on companion vegetable planting. Plant these vegetables close together for better results.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by PlasmaBorneElectric from Seedbomb network
Scoop.it!

Mobile parks will be an oasis in city’s ‘concrete jungle'

Mobile parks will be an oasis in city’s ‘concrete jungle' | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
Imagine sitting space, lush greenery and planters, strategically placed around the city in mobile parks made from shipping containers. A public works committee on April 7 endorsed the mobile urban park initiative.

Via Rebecca Armstrong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by PlasmaBorneElectric from Organic Farming
Scoop.it!

Start a 1-Acre, Self-Sufficient Homestead

Start a 1-Acre, Self-Sufficient Homestead | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
Even on a small 1-acre farm, you can create a self-sufficient homestead by following these guidelines.

 

 

 

http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/self-sufficient-homestead-zm0z11zkon.aspx?PageId=2#ArticleContent

 


Via Giri Kumar
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

The Healthy Carb Diabetes Cookbook: Favorite Foods to Fit Your Meal Plan: Jennifer Bucko Lamplough, Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton R.D.: 9781580402910: Amazon.com: Books

The Healthy Carb Diabetes Cookbook: Favorite Foods to Fit Your Meal Plan

~ Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton R.D. (author) More about this product
List Price: $18.95
Price: $14.83
You Save: $4.12 (22%)
The Healthy Carb Diabetes Cookbook: Favorite Foods to Fit Your Meal Plan [Jennifer Bucko Lamplough, Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton R.D.] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Worried about carbs? The 199 delicious recipes featured in The Healthy Carb Diabetes Cookbook prove that carbs aren't just okay - they're essential. Carefully constructed to be healthy and great tasting
PlasmaBorneElectric's insight:

As a Diabetic I love this book! This is a great book for every healthy eater seeking a cookbook!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Everyday Reading: Homemade Ranch Dressing

Everyday Reading: Homemade Ranch Dressing | Garden Spot | Scoop.it

I grew up, as probably many American children did, dipping everything possible in ranch dressing. It was such a staple in our house that my youngest brother called it "white ketchup," a name that still makes me giggle a little.

But as we started eating more healthily, it seemed just so wrong to drown our CSA vegetables in a mix of completely artificial ingredients.

Homemade ranch it was. And seriously, it's so easy to make (and doesn't have any weird or expensive ingredients, which is a huge annoyance to me in most ranch dressings). I throw everything in an empty yogurt canister, blend the whole thing with my immersion blender and pour it into a glass jar. I don't even bother measuring at this point, because I've made it so many times.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

Grow Vegetables With Table Scraps : HGTV Gardens

Don't compost those leftovers. Use them to grow new edibles in the garden.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by PlasmaBorneElectric
Scoop.it!

How To Make Great Compost - Fast!

How To Make Great Compost - Fast! | Garden Spot | Scoop.it

Compost is the rock star of our garden – helping to create beautiful, healthy, super-charged soil that our plants thrive on. We work generous amounts into our raised row beds each year, add to every hole at planting time – and use as a top-dressing mulch for our veggie plants. So always having enough on hand can be an issue.


We add compost to each hole when we plant our young vegetable seedlings.


The problem is that it can take forever for that “pile out back” to deteriorate into any type of usable material – in some cases a full year or more to fully decompose if left to its own natural ways. However, with just a few simple steps – you can speed up the process and turn your pile into fertile, sweet-smelling compost in just a month or two this growing season.


We always have our big slow-composting pile in our bin – but during the warmer months of spring, summer and fall – we set up smaller “hot piles” to make quick compost.

 

It is one of the reasons we keep extra bins – one for our main area – one for finished compost – and the final bin for setting up and making hot batches of quick compost. (See: How To Make An Inexpensive Compost Bin From Pallets)


The Proper Blend Of Materials – Getting The Right Mix
To create a hot, fast composting pile – the key is in getting the right mix of brown and green ingredients – or more exactly, the right mix of carbon and nitrogen. Compost works best when there is a ratio of about 2/3 brown material (carbon) and 1/3 green (nitrogen).


Carbon materials are your dry additions like leaves, straw, wood, wood chips, ashes, corn stalks, coffee filters, paper, egg shells, dry grass, etc.


Coffee grounds are a great source to add to piles- providing nitrogen


Nitrogen materials are those that heat up the pile – like chicken, rabbit, horse or cow manures, food scraps, green lawn clippings and coffee grounds.


When you start a hot pile – you want to create a mix of 2/3 brown to 1/3 green – and mix it thoroughly. In addition – make sure your pile is at least 3’ x 3’ when starting – it allows for maximum heating of the ingredients.


Size Matters – The Importance of Shredding and Chopping


When it comes to faster composting – it all starts with the size of materials you are putting into the pile. Large pieces take longer to break down that those that are chopped or shredded. A great example – leaves. Left whole – they can take two to three years to completely break down in a pile - but shred them up and they can break down in as little as two to three weeks.


Shredding materials prior to adding to the pile speeds up the process

 

–––––– continue article at source ––––––––

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by PlasmaBorneElectric from Secular Curated News & Views
Scoop.it!

GMO Food Fight » CounterPunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names

GMO Food Fight » CounterPunch: Tells the Facts, Names the Names | Garden Spot | Scoop.it
GMO Food Fight

 

On November 6, in the wake of one of the most expensive and scurrilous smear campaigns in history, six million voters scared the hell out of Monsanto and Big Food Inc. by coming within a razor’s edge of passing the first statewide mandatory labeling law for genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

 

Prop 37, a citizens’ ballot initiative that would have required the mandatory labeling of billions of dollars of genetically engineered (GE) foods and put an end to the routine industry practice of fraudulently marketing GE-tainted foods as “natural” or “all natural,” lost by a narrow margin of 48.6% to 51.4%. Opponents couldn’t claim anything close to a landslide, even though they outspent the pro-labeling campaign almost six to one.

 

The Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) immediately put a happy face on the narrow victory, repeating its tired old propaganda in a public statement: “Proposition 37 was a deeply flawed measure that would have resulted in higher food costs, frivolous lawsuits and increased state bureaucracies. This is a big win for California consumers, taxpayers, business and farmers.”

 

But Jennifer Hatcher, senior vice president of government and public affairs for the Food Marketing Institute, came closer to expressing the real sentiments of the big guns who opposed Prop 37, a measure she had previously said “scared us to death,” in her official statement:

 

“This gives us hope that you can, with a well-funded, well-organized, well-executed campaign, defeat a ballot initiative and go directly to the voters. We hope we don’t have too many of them, because you can’t keep doing that over and over again . . .”.

Maybe they can’t. But we can. Unlike the Food Marketing Institute and its friends at the GMA, consumers can – and will – “keep doing that over and over again.” We can – and will – propose state laws and state ballot initiatives as often as we need, in as many states as we must, until we have what 61 other countries have: truth and transparency in the form of mandatory GMO labeling laws. Far from giving up, the alternative food and farming movement that was narrowly defeated in California has evolved into a battle-savvy, seasoned national movement, bigger and stronger than ever.

more...
No comment yet.