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Garden Libraries
If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. ~Cicero
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The Arboretum Library Legacy of Brian L. Norbury — Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden

The Arboretum Library Legacy of Brian L. Norbury — Los Angeles County Arboretum & Botanic Garden | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
Brian was nearly single-handedly responsible for labeling the entire tree collection! Another, more challenging task, was working through problem tree identifications which he relished. He methodically compared printed descriptions with specimens from several locales before making a recommendation to staff about what he thought the tree might be.

 

Slowly, I was able to help with his reference questions. It wasn’t really a question of me learning more about the possible plants that could grow here. It was a question of us deciding to work through all our preconceived notions of the reference librarian/library customer interaction. What Brian taught me over and over is that reference always works better if it is not a one shot, “Tell me the answer to this question” sort of deal.
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Cloud-based data make searching the world’s museum collections easier

"The cloud idea – getting data out where it's accessible in a variety of ways – is very attractive," said Richard L. Moe, an information technologist and seaweed expert at the University and Jepson Herbaria. "Its capacity for indexing is unparalleled."

For now, though, Moe is working on an NSF-funded project to merge the California plant collections from 17 state institutions into one online database, which has many of the capabilities of a cloud-based collection. UC Berkeley's herbaria have already digitized their 360,000 specimens of California vascular plants (ferns, flowering plants and gymnosperms). Moe is collaborating with institutions as diverse as Cal State Chico and the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, all members of the Consortium of California Herbaria, to help bring their specimens online.

These online collections were used a few years ago by UC Berkeley researchers to predict the impact of climate change on California's endemic land plants.

"The value of online specimens is not only to document existing and new species, but also to investigate the spread of invasive species and future changes to distributions of native species and communities," said Brent Mishler, UC Berkeley professor of integrative biology and director of the campus herbaria. "A similar dataset is needed to document changes in the marine flora."


Via Marybeth Shea
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Heritage Seed Library

Heritage Seed Library | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

"Through our Heritage Seed Library we work to safeguard rare vegetable varieties, that were once the mainstay of British gardens."

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Marybeth Shea's comment, September 18, 2011 7:52 AM
Thanks! You are a good cyber-partner on plants.
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Living Wild (and Eating your Weeds) with Alicia Funk | anewscafe.com

Living Wild (and Eating your Weeds) with Alicia Funk | anewscafe.com | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

""Eat your weeds," is a comment you might hear in conversation with regional author Alicia Funk. This struck me as humorously ironic given that last week's interview taught us more about ways to effectively eradicate troublesome weeds, but never did we consider eating them. This week, Alicia Funk suggests just that: we should eat our weeds. (In most cases the plants to which she is referring are not truly weeds, rather edible and medicinal native plants that thrive in our region.)"[Northern California]

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Tomato Trilogy

Tomato Trilogy | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
I've been obsessing about tomatoes recently and today I'm going to share 3 books I really enjoyed, about - yes, you guessed it - tomatoes. They are totally different from one another, but all great reads.
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New atlas shows extent of climate change

New atlas shows extent of climate change | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
The world's newest island makes it on to the map as the Arctic Uunartoq Qeqertaq, or Warming Island, is officially recognised...

Via Luigi Guarino
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MBG Rare Books: Browse Titles

MBG Rare Books: Browse Titles | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
The Missouri Botanical Garden Library presents its Rare Book Digitization Project.

 

This is a spectacular collection, with beautiful botanical illustrations.

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Lawn care: Lawn book reviews | Gardening Resources, Cornell University

Lawn care: Lawn book reviews | Gardening Resources, Cornell University | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

"Over the last year I have been on a mission to collect and read every lawn care book I could get my hands on at the major booksellers in the US, including web purveyors. What follows is my personal, objective review (where possible I state if otherwise) of almost 20 books currently available on the subject of lawns.

 

I have confined my comments to first provide an overview of the text, then discuss its strengths and weaknesses, and finally highlight and key aspects worthy of further investigation. I have categorized the books into either traditional lawn care or lawn alternatives."

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AHS - National Awards

AHS - National Awards | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

"Created by the American Horticultural Society and the Junior Master Gardener program, the “Growing Good Kids – Excellence in Children’s Literature” award program honors outstanding children’s gardening and nature books."

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Papaws: A fruit more forgotten than forbidden

Papaws: A fruit more forgotten than forbidden | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
A COOK’S GARDEN | If you’re wondering what a papaw is, you’re not alone. This fruit, which once thrived across the eastern United States, is forgotten but not gone.

 

There are several selected cultivated varieties now with larger fruit and smaller seeds. Even though they don't ship well, as a backyard tree they are wonderful. The trees themselves are beautiful with large tropical looking leaves and a broadly pyramidal upright form.

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9-11 Memorial Trees | Horticulture - The Art & Science of Smart Gardening

9-11 Memorial Trees | Horticulture - The Art & Science of Smart Gardening | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
Here's the story behind the trees planted at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum in New York City.
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Botanical Wonders: The Story of the Harvard Glass Flowers

Botanical Wonders: The Story of the Harvard Glass Flowers | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

The Story of the Harvard Glass Flowers

Objects | Drawings

How the Flowers Were Made

Preserving the Glass Flowers

About the Flameworking Demonstrations

Exhibition Podcast | Exhibition Audio Tour

Accompanying Publications

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A Management Guide for Invasive Plants in Southern Forests — Forestry Webinars Portal

A Management Guide for Invasive Plants in Southern Forests — Forestry Webinars Portal | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
This webinar is scheduled for Sep 20, 2011 12:00 pm US/Eastern.

 

Nonnative plants continue to invade and spread through forests in the South. These infestations increasingly erode forest productivity, hinder forest use and management activities, and degrade diversity, habitat, and our recreational experiences. Managers, landowners, and homeowners need to have the latest information on how to prevent entry to their lands, build strategies with neighbors, implement integrated procedures for control, and proceed toward site rehabilitation.

 

We will introduce you to a new book that we co-authored, which is available free from the Southern Research Station, entitled “A Management Guide for Invasive Plants in Southern Forests” (General Technical Report SRS-131). We will provide an overview of how these actions fit together and the latest control methods. The guide provides detailed control prescriptions for 56 prevalent invasive plants and groups for your reference.

 

Free copies of "A Management Guide for Invasive Plants in Southern Forests" (General Technical Report SRS-131) can be requested at pubrequest@fs.fed.us or by calling 828-257-4830.
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Name That Plant | The Medieval Garden Enclosed | The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Name That Plant | The Medieval Garden Enclosed | The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

"Many of the superbly rendered plants and flowers depicted in The Unicorn in Captivity are botanically correct: most are detailed portraits of individual species that are lifelike enough to be immediately identifiable; a number of others are somewhat stylized depictions that conform to a recognizable convention, and a few are so highly stylized that they can’t be given a specific identity. Medieval tapestries as late in date as this one (about the year 1500) have a much higher proportion of recognizable plants than millefleurs tapestries of the early fifteenth century, in which many if not all of the plants may be highly stylized generic types, rather than naturalistically rendered botanical species. 

 

The extraordinary degree of verisimilitude with which most plants in the Unicorn Tapestries are represented is unmatched in other tapestries of comparable date and quality. Eighty-five of the 101 plants depicted in the tapestries were identified by two botanists, E. J. Alexander and C. H. Woodward, in an article first published in The Journal of the New York Botanical Garden (May 1941)."

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Madison Public Library to open Children's Garden

Madison Public Library to open Children's Garden | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
The Madison Public Library will hold the Grand Opening of the Children's' Living Library Garden Sunday from 2-4 p.m. The garden is believed to be the first in Alabama, and possibly the nation, said Project Manager Kristen Kulavich.The garden is believed to be the first in Alabama, and possibly the nation, said Project Manager Kristen Kulavich.

 

"It will feature things like a life-size Scrabble board, mini-amphitheater for story time, Madison County soil history/display, veggie garden, and boat dock with a ship," said Kulavich. "The scenes in the garden will be tied in to the library with our take on storybook themes like 'Charlotte's Web' and 'Where the Wild Things Are.'"
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Kids Dig Gardening at Library

Kids Dig Gardening at Library | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

"“Did you know plants breathe?” Karen Lenahan asked a table full of children Thursday night in the Pikesville Branch Library meeting room. 

 

Rachel Elkes did. “Through their leaves!” she said before even getting called on."

 

 

 

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NYBG.org: The C. V. Starr Virtual Herbarium

NYBG.org: The C. V. Starr Virtual Herbarium | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

Via Marybeth Shea
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Book bike will take library for a ride | Tucson Velo

Book bike will take library for a ride | Tucson Velo | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

"The Pima County Library is putting a new spin on the book mobile. The newest vehicle in its fleet has one less wheel and a giant sunroof."


Via Doug Mirams
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University of Washington Press - Books - The Informed Gardener

University of Washington Press - Books - The Informed Gardener | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

"This enjoyable book should find its way into the hands of almost every gardener. . . . Highly recommended for public libraries with gardeners ready to tackle the literature, as well as academic and special libraries with interests in horticulture and gardening." -Library Journal

 

Anything by Linda Chalker-Scott is worth reading by horticulturists and gardeners.

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Sod sofas in 60 seconds

The Art of Horticulture class at Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences built a pair of sod sofas outside the CCC building on the Ag Q...
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Phenology: Fun and Fulfilling | Plant Talk

Phenology: Fun and Fulfilling | Plant Talk | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

"With our binoculars aimed skyward, we attempt to determine whether–looking up to the height of perhaps thirty to sixty feet–we can honestly say whether or not the tip of a leaf is showing a bit of green. We circle the tree, never leaving the path; we confer, rub aching necks, and, with a sigh, agree that it might be another week until the leaves can be considered truly ”emerging,” and mark ”n” on our data entry sheet. In another week, or sometimes two or three, when the tree reaches the emerging leaf phase, we smile, exchange high fives, congratulate the tree, and mark a satifying ”y” on the data entry sheet."

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BioMed Central Blog : Bringing botany into the digital age?

BioMed Central Blog : Bringing botany into the digital age? | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it

"As of January 2012, botanists describing new taxonomic names will be able to publish their discoveries entirely online. Furthermore, the accompanying descriptions and diagnoses can be published in English or Latin rather than the obligatory Latin. ‘This is completely transforming for electronic journals’..."

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AoB Blog » A new Creative Commons search for botany photos on Flickr

AoB Blog » A new Creative Commons search for botany photos on Flickr | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
Searching for Creative Commons licenced photos on Flickr is easy with an advanced search, but not always useful. A search for ‘tree’ will find lots of results, but not all of them will be a photo of a tree. They’re just as likely to be someone smiling in front of a tree. You can solve this problem by searching photo pools, like Your Kew. The problem here is that not all photos in these pools will be Creative Commons licenced. What would be helpful would be able to search a pool like Encyclopaedia of Life and specify what rights you’d like with the photo.

 

This is what our new Photo search does. You can search all of Flickr if you like, but you can also search photo pools for specifically licenced photos. At the moment the pools you can search are, The Encyclopaedia of Life, Identified Plants, The Secret Life of Plants, Systematic Botany, Tropical and Exotic Flora, UBCBG Botany Photo of the Day and Your Kew. If you can suggest any others that you’d find useful, I can add them.
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Ancient trees: your Green shoots photographs

Ancient trees: your Green shoots photographs | Garden Libraries | Scoop.it
From a much-loved oak that has lived for 1,000 years, to a 300-year-old majestic beech, we asked you to capture images of Britain's ancient trees...
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The Glass Flowers - Harvard Museum of Natural History

Flickr Album The Glass Flowers - Harvard Museum of Natural History...

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