Gaming in Education
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OSX Daily: How to Access & Use the Undo & Redo Buttons on iPad

OSX Daily: How to Access & Use the Undo & Redo Buttons on iPad | Gaming in Education | Scoop.it

"Much like OS X and Windows on the desktop, iOS on the iPad has an “Undo” and “Redo” option. Undo does just what it sounds like, it undoes the last text based action. For example, if you typed out a sentence but decided it wasn’t what you wanted to say, you could hit “Undo” and it would instantly disappear. Redo is also fairly self explanatory, as it redoes the prior text action that was just undone. For example, if you wanted to restore that sentence you typed out but made disappear with “Undo”, then hitting “Redo” would make it appear again."


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Amalia Kingsbury's insight:

Secrets of the iPad.  So much to uncover.

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Nati Pérez Sanz's curator insight, September 8, 2013 3:32 AM

Siempre aprendiendo..

Michael MacNeil's curator insight, September 8, 2013 11:18 PM

Undo and redo, these are favorites of mine.  Now I can feel less locked in on ipad.

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How to Use Airplay Without Apple TV : Apple Product FAQs

Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehowtech Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehowtech Just because you don't have an Apple ...
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Daphne Bavelier: Your brain on video games | Video on TED.com

How do fast-paced video games affect the brain? Step into the lab with cognitive researcher Daphne Bavelier to hear surprising news about how video games, even action-packed shooter games, can help us learn, focus and, fascinatingly, multitask.
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SuperBetter Labs | Making worldchanging games powered by the science of positive emotion and social connection

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IFTF: Home

IFTF: Home | Gaming in Education | Scoop.it
Amalia Kingsbury's insight:

So interested in how gaming can change the world in a positive way.

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Is Minecraft the Ultimate Educational Tool? | Idea Channel | PBS Digital Studios

If you've watched past episodes of Idea Channel, you know we're huge fans of Minecraft. This totally amazing video game allows you to build your own world fr...
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eLearning Guild Research: Is Your LMS Social Enough? by Patti Shank : Learning Solutions Magazine

eLearning Guild Research: Is Your LMS Social Enough? by Patti  Shank : Learning Solutions Magazine | Gaming in Education | Scoop.it

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, August 22, 2013 6:26 AM

"Social learning comes up again when looking at the future role of the LMS. Many things are changing in learning, including informal and social learning, mobile learning, and performance support. Many of us are talking about the changing role of formal learning and therefore the changing role for learning management systems. Some are even questioning the need for learning management systems."

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Game-Based Learning Is Probably Worth Looking Into

Game-Based Learning Is Probably Worth Looking Into | Gaming in Education | Scoop.it

Jessica Trybus of the New Media Institute makes an interesting point. “Deconstruct the fun in any good game,” she says, “and it becomes clear that what makes it enjoyable is the built-in learning process.”

 


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 19, 2013 3:55 AM

Good basic introduction to the pros and cons of game-based learning

Marc E. Moglen's comment, June 19, 2013 8:58 AM
At first, I did not like this article's title, but now I find it appropriate. It seems as if it is still not clear what the practical effects of digital games in the learning environment will be (I say "will" as it seems inevitable). Justin Boyle does mention a study that showed (in the case of University students) that "despite the better written and group assignment performance of the traditionally educated subjects, the game-enhanced students completed the course with better average scores overall". This is a concerning finding as it suggests that games may be readily adopted if it is shown that they can increase student performance (e.g. grades), yet the fact that games may lower actual facets of educational progress (e.g. group work) will probably be swept under the carpet.
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The 21st-Century Digital Learner

The 21st-Century Digital Learner | Gaming in Education | Scoop.it

After hosting dozens of these conversations, I realize one thing: We just don't listen enough to our students. The tradition in education has been not to ask the students what they think or want, but rather for adult educators to design the system and curriculum by themselves, using their "superior" knowledge and experience.


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Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 24, 2013 5:27 PM

Just as speaking is the outcome of listening, so writing is the outcome of reading, not the other way round. Listening to the student should also include "listening" to their writing. ie., analyse what they are saying and how they are doing it.  When students evaluate their own work, the teacher should listen and guide them to ways of improving it, whether it be punctuation, paragraphing, spelling, or word or subject knowledge.  This is how we bring students on board and empower them to learn. 

Aunty Alice's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:49 PM

Listening to students has two aspects; listening to what they say orally, and 'listening' to their writing which is only another way of talking, only through a code. Just as learning to speak is tied closely to listening to what is said and being exposed to words that help one to think better, so writing is the same  and relies on reading "or listening" to what others say and how they say it to express clear meaning. The two subjects, reading and writing, are closlely intertwined yet we compartmentalize them in the literacy curriculum. An example of adults thinking they know what is best for children.  

Nuno Ricardo Oliveira's curator insight, December 28, 2013 11:53 AM

The 21st-Century Digital Learner

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Games for Science | The Scientist Magazine®

Games for Science | The Scientist Magazine® | Gaming in Education | Scoop.it
Scientists are using video games to tap the collective intelligence of people around the world, while doctors and educators are turning to games to treat and teach.
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Minecraft winning over not just teens — but also teachers

Minecraft winning over not just teens — but also teachers | Gaming in Education | Scoop.it
Teachers are beginning to use Minecraft to teach concepts in math, science and the humanities. They also learn real world skills, like perseverance.
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Katie Salen on the Power of Game-Based Learning (Big Thinkers Series)

Katie Salen on the Power of Game-Based Learning (Big Thinkers Series) | Gaming in Education | Scoop.it
Katie Salen, executive director of nonprofit design studio Institute of Play, offers a look inside the ground-breaking school in New York City that she co-founded, Quest to Learn.
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Games and Education Scholar James Paul Gee on Video Games, Learning, and Literacy

James Paul Gee is an expert on how video games fit within an overall theory of learning and literacy. He is the Mary Lou Fulton Presidential Professor of Lit...

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MinecraftEdu is Coming To Schools Near You

Play Minecraft in school and learn with MinecraftEdu Follow Minecraft at GameSpot.com! http://www.gamespot.com/minecraft/ Official Site - http://www.minecraf...

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GwynethJones's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:03 AM

 MinecraftEdu is Coming To Schools Near You  /via @gamespot #edtech #MinecraftEdu #edchat  @iEducator --But Second Life is WAY prettier! ;-)

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Simulations can reach Gen Y when other methods can’t | L&D

Simulations can reach Gen Y when other methods can’t | L&D | Gaming in Education | Scoop.it

Training needs, tools and solutions are constantly evolving. As a health care executive at Raytheon Professional Services, Bryan Chance has been watching these trends evolve in his industry for years. Chance and his colleagues at Raytheon Professional Services have found that simulation-based training can help employers adapt their training offerings to accommodate their new employees’ learning preferences. I interviewed him to find out what Gen Y thinks of simulation-based training and how it’s revamping corporate learning systems.

What kind of training is Gen Y looking for?

Chance: Often, Gen Y employees will say they don’t need training. What they really mean is that they’re not interested in traditional classroom training. They’re far more likely to welcome experiential, technology-based training that aligns with the mass array of media they engage with on a daily basis. These multi-modal training solutions can tap into Gen Y’s experience with everything from video games to social media, making the training experience significantly more engaging and impactful than a traditional classroom-based, instructor-led, PowerPoint-based training.

Gen Y can also benefit from training initiatives that help identify competency gaps. Simulation-based training is a great first step in opening learners’ eyes to the fact that their skill levels may not necessarily match their knowledge bases. After many individuals’ first encounters with this form of training, they are often surprised by how much they don’t know. Having memorized their textbooks does not necessarily mean they are capable of applying their education in high-pressure environments and high-consequence situations.

I often work with recent nursing and therapy graduates who have extensive classroom experience, but don’t yet possess the hands-on skills needed to effectively and safely interact with patients. Simulation-based training gives students the ability to gain a better understanding of their surroundings and improve their skills in a risk-free environment.

How else is simulation-based training different from more traditional methods?

Chance: Simulation-based training creates safe practice environments, where mistakes are learning opportunities rather than potential disasters. A common mantra in health care is “see one, do one, teach one,” implying that once you have seen a doctor or a nurse perform a procedure and performed one yourself, you are qualified to teach the next batch of learners. It’s a clever and memorable saying. Simulation training can help improve on this knowledge transfer process by creating additional opportunities to “see and do” critical skills.

Can Gen Y participate in simulation training on the go?

Chance: Many simulation solutions are mobile friendly. Gen Y is an on-demand information generation, and the fact that simulation-based training can be made available on multiple platforms makes it possible for them to access information and training programs how they want to, when they want to, and in a form that best fits their learning style.

For the most part, Gen Yers prefer consuming information in small bites. The nature of simulation-based training allows learners to segment the training curricula into manageable pieces, so they don’t have to drink from the proverbial fire hose.

Many of today’s health care simulation-based training courses still involve a classroom of learners reviewing training materials or standing around a mannequin. Simulation-based training which leverages games and avatars provides equivalent (if not significantly better) experiential learning that can be completed in an environment where the learner feels most comfortable, and at his or her preferred pace.

Of course, we don’t except to see team environments completely replaced with on-demand, virtual and mobile solutions. At Raytheon Professional Services, we would like to see is a better blend of learning that incorporates new tools that help to better reach this generation of learners. We’re not seeking to replace training mannequins; rather, we want to see training programs incorporate multiple tools in situations where each learning tool proves to be most effective. For example, inserting an IV or assisting with a birth are difficult procedures to practice on an iPad, but pre-work completed via interactive game could increase the efficiency and effectiveness of in-classroom training. A good blend of training solutions will help balance cost, convenience and effectiveness of training programs.

So Gen Y’s happy, but what about older workers? How can learning leaders make sure all generations are engaged in simulation training?

Chance: Older workers could experience a steeper learning curve dependent upon their knowledge and comfort level with technology. However, when it comes to adopting new training initiatives such as simulation-based training, I believe they will embrace it upon seeing how effective it can be.

What’s the future of simulation training?

Chance: The future of any technology depends on how the price of the technology compresses, and the same is true for simulation-based training.

At Raytheon Professional Services, we believe that in the future, simulation-based training programs will be a combination of more traditional learning methods and advanced gaming technologies.

We recently started working with a prominent teaching hospital that discovered medication errors were a leading cause of death and complications among its patients. Initially, we wondered if this was a knowledge issue – did doctors and nurses not understand how and when to deliver medications? Were administration issues at the root of the problem? Upon further inspection, we came to a very different conclusion. The nurses understood what they were supposed to do, but other factors got in the way of effectively completing the task at hand. Mistakes were made in scenarios where a visitor was asking questions, a doctor was yelling down the hall, an alert was sounding somewhere in the room, etc. The majority of these errors were performed by Gen Y/new nursing grads. We developed a simulation-based training game that walks players through the medication administration process, complete with distractions every five to 10 minutes, simulating a realistic environment. We then tested knowledge retention. The program is in beta right now and we’re already seeing some positive results.

Our goal is to leverage our knowledge base as learning experts to identify the root cause of glitches and complications and determine how we can use technology to overcome those obstacles in the most efficient and effective way possible. Moving forward, simulation-based training will be an increasingly important tool in the training industry’s arsenal as it continues to develop innovative solutions to meet training needs.


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Louise Botha's curator insight, November 4, 2013 5:31 PM

Simulation refers not just to highly technological mannequins, consider high fidelity in another light-Mask ed and simulated patients can allow learners to interact in a different manner.