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Aetna Hopes Games Will Make People Healthier - Technology Review

Aetna Hopes Games Will Make People Healthier - Technology Review | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
The health-care industry is using games to encourage better choices.

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You'll Need a Doctor's Prescription to Download This App

You'll Need a Doctor's Prescription to Download This App | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

This year, when patients throughout the United States begin downloading the world’s first doctor-prescribed smartphone app, mobile health care will finally get what big-time medicine most requires: a way to get insurance companies to pay for it.

 

 

The app, called BlueStar, helps people with Type 2 diabetes (the most common kind) by suggesting, in real time, when to test their blood sugar and how to control it by varying medication, food, and exercise. That it requires a physician’s prescription is actually an advantage, because it means insurance companies will reimburse BlueStar’s fee.

 

 

“This is a piece of software getting the same treatment as a medical device,” says Sonny Vu, cofounder of Misfit Wearables in San Francisco, a maker of wearable computing devices. “It’s pretty world-changing.”

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration cleared BlueStar for market in 2010, in line with its recent determination to regulate devices that provide a diagnosis or recommend a treatment, not those that simply track activity, like calories consumed or steps taken. The success that WellDoc, the app’s manufacturer, has had with the FDA may inspire other mobile health companies to go the regulatory route. “It gives us hope that you can pull something like this off,” says Vu. The European Commission has also issued guidance on regulations for mobile health apps, but countries such as China and India have not.

 

The app addresses one of the toughest tasks a physician has: changing patient behavior.

 

Doctors ask diabetic patients to keep a daily record of glucose readings, food, exercise, and medications. If managed well, these factors keep patients’ blood sugar in a safe range, reducing their risk of complications from the disease. But only 15 to 20 percent of patients actually keep a log, says Philis-Tsimikas.

 

Diabetes apps that make activity tracking easier are available, but their effectiveness is limited. “No one does it, because you have to wait 90 days before you get feedback [at your next doctor visit],”

 

 more at http://spectrum.ieee.org/biomedical/devices/bluestar-the-first-prescriptiononly-app
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nrip's curator insight, January 4, 11:47 PM

Will using this app have any side effects? If not,  why should a Doctor "have" to prescribe the App? 


While this idea seems revolutionary and game changing, I think this is actually retrograde if its available "ONLY" on prescription.

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Paper-thin skin patch collects vitals: E-health made easier and more comfortable

Paper-thin skin patch collects vitals: E-health made easier and more comfortable | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

The future of health care could be found in a tiny, paper-thin skin patch that collects vital information. The Bio-patch sensor developed by researchers at Stockholm's KTH Royal Institute of Technology is inexpensive, versatile and, best of all, comfortable to wear.

 

"On the chest it provides electrocardiography (ECG), on the skull it measures brainwaves (EEC), and on the forearm it can measure muscle response to stimulation from the nervous system (EMG)," he says. It also has a built-in sensor that constantly monitors body temperature.

 

With a wireless connection, the patient can analyse the readings in their smartphone, or send the data via internet to a healthcare professional for diagnosis.

 

The thinking behind Bio-patch is that health care can be moved out of the hospitals and into the home, Yang says. "Bio-patch is a step towards what is known as self-care, which is valuable especially for patients discharged after an operation, or for the elderly living unassisted," he says.

 

While the technology is versatile, interest has focused on the heart. "Heart diseases account for the majority of all deaths in the EU," he says.

 


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d-Wise 's curator insight, April 25, 2013 8:44 AM

A step towards self health beyond the gym...the technology that awaits us as we move into the future is incredible...was Star Trek that far off? The challenge no becomes how do we decide which ones are safe and effective.

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Videogame with animated tree helps stroke patients walk again

Videogame with animated tree helps stroke patients walk again | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
At senior care facilities and rehabilitation facilities, stroke patients may soon be enjoying a videogame that helps them walk again by challenging them to stand while having fun.

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MIT Builds An Open-Source Platform For Your Body

MIT Builds An Open-Source Platform For Your Body | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Siberian temperatures. Eleven grueling days, navigating rough terrain. Six teams, matched for talent, competing for glory at the end. The Iditarod? Nah, just the annual MIT Health and Wellness Hackathon. 

 

This isn’t your average social app-fest. The goal is to jump-start an open source platform where apps that track all different aspects of your bodily health can exchange information. It’s a Sisyphean task, since most digital health solutions today are trapped in silos, but the organizers believe they can change that by enfranchising big companies instead of trying to disrupt them.

 

To unify the segmented market for health technology takes heavy lifting on the engineering side, since much of the progress made by private companies hasn’t been shared back to the community. Here, each team is required to use open source and open standard tools so that things work together seamlessly: specifically, the Lab's patient-centered CollaboRhythm platform and theIndivo X system for personalized health records.

 


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Wii Fit U will be released in the first half of 2013

Wii Fit U will be released in the first half of 2013 | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
Joystiq reports that the Wii Fit version for the Wii U platform, Wii Fit U (clever name!) will be coming in the first half of 2013.  The game will come with a pedometer in addition to the familiar ...

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The Social Business of Fighting Disease

The Social Business of Fighting Disease | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Whilst social media tools have primarily been used for commercial ends, there is a growing stream of evidence showing that it has scientific and social benefits as well. Nowhere is this more so than in the tracking and prevention of diseases.

 

For instance Google Flu Trends tracks search queries and applies its trending algorithm to gain an understanding of where flu outbreaks are occuring. A 21 month study by John Hopkins University found that the app was exceptionally good at predicting when hospitals would start to see people coming in with flu symptoms.

 

Primary investigator of the study, Dr. Richard Rothman, said that the results were promising for “eventually developing a standard regional or national early warning system for frontline health care workers.”

 

Social media context

 

It could be argued however that social media is a better method of tracking the spread of infection because it provides you with better context. Back in January the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene reported that tweets and other public ‘status updates’ were a better way of determining the spread of cholera in post-earthquake Haiti than official channels. The research was conducted by scientists at Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School and with over 6,000 people having died from the disease in Haiti, it has serious implications in terms of disaster prevention.

 

“When we analyzed news and Twitter feeds from the early days of the epidemic in 2010, we found they could be mined for valuable information on the cholera outbreak that was available up to two weeks ahead of surveillance reports issued by the government health ministry,” said Rumi Chunara, PhD, of the Informatics Program at Children’s Hospital Boston, Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School, and the lead author of the study. “The techniques we employed eventually could be used around the world as an affordable and efficient way to quickly detect the onset of an epidemic and then intervene with such things as vaccines and antibiotics.”


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Luca M. Sergio's curator insight, December 20, 2012 7:26 AM
so much potential from the social space to identify disease trends and act at an early stage ....
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It Doesn't Look Like It, but I Think This Ridiculous Red Bull Ice Skating Game ... - Kotaku

It Doesn't Look Like It, but I Think This Ridiculous Red Bull Ice Skating Game ... - Kotaku | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
It Doesn't Look Like It, but I Think This Ridiculous Red Bull Ice Skating Game ...Kotakuexergaming kinect xbox 360 red bull crashed ice kinect sportaku. Dec 12, 2012 6:00 PM. Share. Facebook; Twitter; StumbleUpon; Tumblr; Instapaper; Email this post.

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The Little-Known Surprise That Improves Learning in Serious Games

The Little-Known Surprise That Improves Learning in Serious Games | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
By addressing these elements when we design these serious games, we can stimulate the learner’s deeper level understanding and improve learning performance.

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Serious Games As Medical Animation For Surgeon and Patient Education | SERIOUS GAMES MARKET

Serious Games As Medical Animation For Surgeon and Patient Education | SERIOUS GAMES MARKET | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Combining simulation and story for medical education


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Serious Games As Medical Animation For Surgeon and Patient Education | SERIOUS GAMES MARKET

Serious Games As Medical Animation For Surgeon and Patient Education | SERIOUS GAMES MARKET | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Combining simulation and story for medical education


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Teenage Gamers Better At Simulated Surgery Than Medical Residents | TechCrunch

Teenage Gamers Better At Simulated Surgery Than Medical Residents | TechCrunch | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
Forget AP Biology and Latin class: get those pre-meds hooked on Call of Duty. The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that teenage video gamers were better at simulated surgery than medical residents.

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Video game playing tied to creativity - HealthCanal.com

Video game playing tied to creativityHealthCanal.comBoth boys and girls who play video games tend to be more creative, regardless of whether the games are violent or nonviolent, according to new research by Michigan State University scholars.


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Active Gaming: 5 Video Games That Get You Off the Couch

Active Gaming: 5 Video Games That Get You Off the Couch | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
Some people have all kinds of qualms when it comes to the gaming experience. Perhaps they think that modern video games are too violent (or that they encourage violence).

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The value of big data in health care = $450 billion

The value of big data in health care = $450 billion | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Exploiting Big Data in industry is Big News these days, and nowhere is the potential for leveraging the concept greater than in health care. McKinsey & Company estimates that harnessing big data across five dimensions of health care could yield nearly one-half trillion dollars’ worth of value in The ‘big data’ revolution in healthcare.

 

The chart summarizes McKinsey’s calculations on the value of Big Data in health care at its maximum.

 

Before digging into the value potential, just what is Big Data in health care? Statistics and information are generated in the health care system about patients: say, during visits with physicians, in lab tests, via digital imaging procedures, when filling prescriptions, and during inpatient hospital stays.

 

All of these data points “live” in various data systems: in physician office records systems (in paper files and, increasingly, in electronic health records, or EHRs), pharmacy claims systems (housed in systems managed by pharmacy benefits management companies and health plans), hospitals’ information systems, and — for people who self-track data at home and on-the-go but don’t communicate it to health providers, in consumers personal health records in the internet cloud (say, via the Withings Wi-Fi weight scale or Fitbit online portals).

 


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Leonard Kish's curator insight, July 20, 2013 7:59 AM

Holy Moley, No wonder Venture funding for Digital Health is doubling this year!!

Mighty Casey's curator insight, July 22, 2013 9:46 AM

Geektastic. In a good way.

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A Million Smartphones Will Drive Biggest Heart Health Study in History

A Million Smartphones Will Drive Biggest Heart Health Study in History | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) are recruiting a million participants to join a decade long heart health study. The enabling factor? Smartphones. It’s a great example of information technology bleeding into other fields and speeding their progress. If all goes to plan, the UCSF study (dubbed Health eHeart) will be the broadest such study ever completed.

 

In comparison, the much lauded Framingham Heart Study, initiated in 1948, recruited and studied 15,000 participants over three generations. The Framingham study outlined today’s familiar set of heart risks that doctors use to evaluate patients and prescribe lifestyle changes—high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, smoking, obesity, diabetes, stress, and physical inactivity.

 

The discovery and subsequent mediation of these risk factors is largely credited with a 75% decline in mortality rates due to heart-related disease in the last half century. See Dr. Hans Diehl discuss how heart disease was shown to be more of a lifestyle illness than a genetic illness by World War II and the Framingham study below:

 


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Gestural Interaction in the Operating Room with a Wii Remote and Kinect

Gestural Interaction in the Operating Room with a Wii Remote and Kinect | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
Student Tamara Worst used two 3D sensors, a Wii remote and Microsoft Kinect, to detect the orientation and position of a surgeon's right foot in the OR. She wrote software in Processing to allow th...

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Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors

Researchers say AI prescribes better treatment than doctors | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Two Indiana University researchers have developed a computer model they say can identify significantly better and less-expensive treatments than can doctors acting alone.

 

A pair of Indiana University researchers has found that a pair of predictive modeling techniques can make significantly better decisions about patients’ treatments than can doctors acting alone. How much better? They claim a better than 50 percent reduction in costs and more than 40 percent better patient outcomes.

 

The idea behind the research, carried out by Casey Bennett and Kris Hauser, is simple and gets to the core of why so many people care so much about data in the first place: If doctors can consider what’s actually happening and likely to happen instead of relying on intuition, they should be able to make better decisions.

 

In order to prove out their hypothesis, the researchers worked with “clinical data, demographics and other information on over 6,700 patients who had major clinical depression diagnoses, of which about 65 to 70 percent had co-occurring chronic physical disorders like diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease.”

 

They built a model using Markov decision processes — which predict the probabilities of future events based on those immediately preceding them — and dynamic decision networks — which extend the Markov processes by considering the specific features of those events in order to determine the probabilities. Essentially, their model considers the specifics of a patient’s current state and then determines the best action to effect the best possible outcome.

 


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Serious Games As Medical Animation For Surgeon and Patient Education | SERIOUS GAMES MARKET

Serious Games As Medical Animation For Surgeon and Patient Education | SERIOUS GAMES MARKET | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Combining simulation and story for medical education


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Playing Video Games Related to Stronger Surgery Skills - GCo

Playing Video Games Related to Stronger Surgery Skills - GCo | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
A recent study by researchers demonstrated playing video games was positively correlated with the ability to perform minimally-invasive surgery techniques.

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Rapid Rehab Smart Insole Will Train Athletes and Assist Rehab Patients

Rapid Rehab Smart Insole Will Train Athletes and Assist Rehab Patients | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
Over at the University of Utah, engineering professor Stacy Bamberg has developed a smart shoe insole to shamelessly compete with Nike's line of high-tech (Rapid Rehab Smart Insole Will Train Athletes and Assist Rehab Patients

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The Social Business of Fighting Disease

The Social Business of Fighting Disease | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Whilst social media tools have primarily been used for commercial ends, there is a growing stream of evidence showing that it has scientific and social benefits as well. Nowhere is this more so than in the tracking and prevention of diseases.

 

For instance Google Flu Trends tracks search queries and applies its trending algorithm to gain an understanding of where flu outbreaks are occuring. A 21 month study by John Hopkins University found that the app was exceptionally good at predicting when hospitals would start to see people coming in with flu symptoms.

 

Primary investigator of the study, Dr. Richard Rothman, said that the results were promising for “eventually developing a standard regional or national early warning system for frontline health care workers.”

 

Social media context

 

It could be argued however that social media is a better method of tracking the spread of infection because it provides you with better context. Back in January the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene reported that tweets and other public ‘status updates’ were a better way of determining the spread of cholera in post-earthquake Haiti than official channels. The research was conducted by scientists at Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School and with over 6,000 people having died from the disease in Haiti, it has serious implications in terms of disaster prevention.

 

“When we analyzed news and Twitter feeds from the early days of the epidemic in 2010, we found they could be mined for valuable information on the cholera outbreak that was available up to two weeks ahead of surveillance reports issued by the government health ministry,” said Rumi Chunara, PhD, of the Informatics Program at Children’s Hospital Boston, Research Fellow at Harvard Medical School, and the lead author of the study. “The techniques we employed eventually could be used around the world as an affordable and efficient way to quickly detect the onset of an epidemic and then intervene with such things as vaccines and antibiotics.”


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Luca M. Sergio's curator insight, December 20, 2012 7:26 AM
so much potential from the social space to identify disease trends and act at an early stage ....
Rescooped by Gaming Health from GAMIFICATION & SERIOUS GAMES IN HEALTH by PHARMAGEEK
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#mHealth Summit: Serious Games Alive, Well and Prepared to Partner | HealthWorks Collective

#mHealth Summit: Serious Games Alive, Well and Prepared to Partner | HealthWorks Collective | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
Monday afternoon in the Washington DC area, a panel of serious game developers moderated by fellow game developer and co-founder at Digitalmill, Ben Sawyer (@BenSawyer) addressed a packed room of mHealth Summit attendees looking to become educated...

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Information Literacy Weblog: SEEK search skills game

Information Literacy Weblog: SEEK search skills game | Gaming Health | Scoop.it

Helps build digital literacy


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Keeping Medical Data Secure with Games in Health

Keeping Medical Data Secure with Games in Health | Gaming Health | Scoop.it
Games in health are often used to educate patients or promote healthy lifestyles. Now games are being used to educate physicians and medical office staff as well. As more practices adopt electronic health records, patient privacy and data security have become bigger challenges. Smaller practices particularly face challenges in complying with HIPAA standards while coping with fewer resources available for training. Now, a new game developed by the Health and Human Services Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology is helping teach health care employees best practices for protecting medical data.

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Some cool stats and overview of Gaming dynamics.

Gamification has tremendous potential in the education space. How can we use it to deliver truly meaningful experiences to students? Learn all about the impact of gaming on education in this infographic.

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