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Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education
Using games and game strategies for enhancing learning in higher education settings.
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Minecraft and The Future of Transmedia Learning | DMLcentral

Minecraft and The Future of Transmedia Learning | DMLcentral | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
2014 won’t be remembered as the year Microsoft bought Minecraft. Instead, it will be understood as the beginning of the wider understanding that Minecraft is more than just a game. Yes, it CAN be played like a game, it relies on technical components similar to games, it supports a user community around it in a manner similar to other games… but, the metaphor of “game” is no longer useful. It misses the bigger picture. It distracts us from the broader disruptions it is causing in the social fabric. So now I, too, will join the quiet chorus saying Minecraft is not just a game.

What then will I say?

This: Minecraft is our first look at the future of transmedia learning.
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Never Alone - Game

Never Alone - Game | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Never Alone (Kisima Ingitchuna) is the first game developed in collaboration with the Iñupiat, an Alaska Native people. Nearly 40 Alaska Native elders, storytellers and community members contributed to the development of the game. Play as a young Iñupiat girl and an arctic fox as they set out to find the source of the eternal blizzard which threatens the survival of everything they have ever known.

Guide both characters in single-player mode or play cooperatively with a friend or family member as you trek through frozen tundra, leap across treacherous ice floes, swim through underwater ice caverns, and face numerous enemies both strange and familiar in the journey to save the girl’s village.

In this atmospheric puzzle platformer, you will explore awe-inspiring environments, perform heroic deeds, and meet legendary characters from Iñupiaq stories — all narrated by a master storyteller in the spoken Iñupiaq language.
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Panel: Government should invest in video games to help students learn

Panel: Government should invest in video games to help students learn | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
A panel of experts was in Washington last week advocating for more fun in schools – more “hard fun.”

That is the term that was being used by industry and government officials who were part of a panel Thursday that talked about how video games and gaming can help students learn.

“We’ve been trying to find a way to put those two together for centuries,” said Greg Toppo, a national education writer for USA Today.

“I think one of the most exciting things is that this movement has that at its forefront,” he said. “It’s always thinking about hard fun.”

Hard fun is a goal that game designers at New York-based Electric Funstuff keep in mind for their projects, said CEO and co-founder David Langendoen. He believes that games are much more than just an activity.
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eCampus News 80 game-based products for higher-ed coming soon - eCampus News

eCampus News 80 game-based products for higher-ed coming soon - eCampus News | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
New game-based learning products focus on critical thinking, psychology, science, and more.

game-based [1]Toolwire will launch 80 new game-based learning products in 2015. Covering topics such as writing, student success skills, critical thinking, psychology and environmental science, these games aim to help higher education institutions engage and retain students within core general education courses.

Colleges and universities are increasingly being held accountable for student success and graduation. Of students who attend college, 53 percent struggle to complete their degrees, and 33 percent drop out entirely. Half of all student drops occur in the first 20 units.
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Agi Starr's curator insight, May 19, 5:55 PM

This may make even statistics a lot more interesting ... Requires a lot of creativity, and leads to deeper level of processing and engagement

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Medieval Ethics: Designing Historical Systems

Medieval Ethics: Designing Historical Systems | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

We live our lives immersed in numerous complex systems – systems of meaning, economic systems, information networks, large socio-technical systems, and so forth.  One of the things that make videogames interesting is that they allow us to momentarily step into a different set of systems and play with them.  We often refer to this process as stepping into a Virtual World, which is a useful way of looking not just at the the persistent online spaces in games like World of Warcraft, but at games and software in a much broader sense, as well.  Stepping into a virtual world allows us to experiment with different systems or even simulated versions of real-world systems.  For example, José Zagal (2009) has noted that games can make moral demands of players by encouraging them to reflect on moral dilemmas, such as those found in the Ultima IV or Manhunt.  In a previous post, I discussed how playing games like gyān chaupar (better known in the West as Snakes and Ladders) allow us to understand the ethical and moral reasoning of other cultures and groups.

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Donald Clark Plan B: Does gamification play Pavlov with learners? DOs & DON'Ts

Donald Clark Plan B: Does gamification play Pavlov with learners? DOs & DON'Ts | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

The massive success of online games led many to suggest that games and gamification, could be used to turbo-charge online learning. Take a little magic dust from gaming, sprinkle generously and we’ll all find it more fun, be more motivated and learn to love learning. But there’s pros and cons here, as it can both help and hinder learning. If gamification is simply scoring, bonuses and badges, the 21st century version of Pavlov's dogs, that would be a disappointment. The simple stimuli, scores and rewards may keep learners going forward but it can be a distractive, disappointing and shallow form of engagement, skating across the surface of content. It may also demand more cognitive effort for not much gain. The danger is in taking learning back to the behaviourist era, with simple Pavlovian conditioned responses, or S-O-R theory. The learning game still has far too much behaviourist theory. Most obviously through learning objectives.

 

On the other hand, many proven, evidence-based pieces of learning theory seem to be congruent with games techniques, such as chunking, constructive failure, practice, doing and performance. I've given a detailed analsis of a real example here - Angry Birds.
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Play + Learn

Play + Learn | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Welcome

Play + Learn is a community conference that explores how we can make education and training more engaging through play and games.

Launching in 2015 and hosted by the University of Bradford, UK, Play + Learn brings together some of the world's leading thinkers, designers and users of play-based learning.

Why not join the conversation with us between 17 - 19 June 2015?
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What about games in academic libraries? | Knight | outfind.ca *

What about games in academic libraries?  | Knight | outfind.ca * | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Posts about Knight written by Olivier Charbonneau

 

"I wanted to pass on this post on my “work” blog about links and articles related to building a collection of games in an academic library:
http://outfind.ca/2015/04/15/what-about-games-in-academic-libraries/
I spend a couple of hours searching on the internet and academic journals for sources – please let me know if you feel I should add content on this page (particularly if you have or like a game-related library guide). And yes, I very much welcome authors pointing out their relevant works or articles!"

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Home - Gamification World

Home - Gamification World | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
A global community to foster the evolution of the Gamification industry. And the most impressive Gamification resources for both the professionals and people interesting in learning what they can expect from Gamification.
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 16, 10:02 AM

Check this out! 

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Play This Video Game and Call Me in the Morning

Play This Video Game and Call Me in the Morning | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists hope their video game will be the first approved by the FDA
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The 2015 MCV Pacific Women In Games list

The 2015 MCV Pacific Women In Games list | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Here is the unveiling of the inaugural list.

 

The below list highlights the 75 most influential women, across all facets of the Australian and New Zealand Games Industries.

 

These women are now eligible for the 2015 MCV Pacific Women In Games Awards presented by Xbox, which will be awarded at the first ever MCV Pacific Women In Games Luncheon presented by Xbox. They will vote amongst the list to decide the four categories.

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Video Gaming Made Me a History Major

Video Gaming Made Me a History Major - Bright - Medium
Empire of Earth and Medieval 2 Total War made me actually care about school.
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 11, 11:06 PM

Yes there is a positive side to the video game craze among young people. :)  -Lon

David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 12, 11:36 AM

Geeky-cool stuff! Thanks to Peter Mellow.

Rob Rose's curator insight, April 12, 2:49 PM

As the sloth says... Follow your dream!

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Karen - The Space

Karen - The Space | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
A cross between gaming and storytelling, Karen offers a disconcerting experience that reflects on the data mining techniques employed by corporations and governments.

Co-commissioned by The Space and created by Blast Theory, Karen is a chaotic and over-friendly life coach in the form of a new smartphone app, to be released soon.

Karen gets to know you using psychological testing techniques. She askes questions about your outlook on the world and life experiences, and uses the collected data to profile you and personalise your week-long experience. The app mines big data and reflects the results back to the user, in a playful and disconcerting way. Blast Theory is an award-winning artists collective and a pioneer in digital storytelling.
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Gamification: Engaging Students With Narrative

Gamification: Engaging Students With Narrative | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Gamify a classroom by introducing a fun narrative, reframing assignments to fit into that narrative, and making students care about the outcome.

 

When looking at how engaged students are in playing games, it makes sense to capture some of the ideas that game designers use to engage the player. This idea of applying gaming mechanics to non-game situations is known as gamification.

 

What defines a game is having a goal or objective. However almost all games also have some sort of theme or story. The classic game Candyland has nothing really to do with candy. It's just about moving along a path to get to the end. The game's theme contributes to making it fun. What we learn from games is that adding narrative, storyline, a theme, or fun graphics to our lessons and activities can help students be more engaged.

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Game Jolt | Indie Games Development community

Game Jolt | Indie Games Development community | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Game Jolt is a place chock full of free indie games that are actively maintained by the developers themselves.
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Gamification of the Classroom

Gamification of the Classroom | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Gamification of the Classroom By Alice Keeler

 

These are the slides, resources and notes for my presentation at BETT 2015 in London on “Gamification of the Classroom”

 

More resources at:  http://www.alicekeeler.com/teachertech/2015/01/23/gamification-of-the-classroom/

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PLAY THE PAST | About

PLAY THE PAST | About | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Collaboratively edited and authored, Play the Past is dedicated to thoughtfully exploring and discussing the intersection of cultural heritage (very broadly defined) and games/meaningful play (equally broadly defined). Play the Past contributors come from a wide variety of backgrounds, domains, perspectives, and motivations (for being interested in both games and cultural heritage) – a fact which is evident in the wide variety of topics we tackle in our posts.

It is very important to note that Play the Past isn’t just about the intersection of cultural heritage and digital games, its also about non-digital games (boardgames, tabletop games, collectible card games, etc.), alternate reality games (ARGs), barely games (a term originally coined by Russel Davies – no, not the Doctor Who Russel Davies – and built upon by our very own Rob McDougall), and playful mechanics (or “gamifying” as its been recently called).

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Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: Can You Tell The Difference?

Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: Can You Tell The Difference? | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: How To Integrate Them Into Your eLearning Course. Gamification vs Game-Based eLearning: Can You Tell The Difference?

Via EDTECH@UTRGV
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elearning at eCampus ULg's curator insight, April 21, 3:18 AM

Interesting information linked with the previuos post !

David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 21, 9:47 AM

Great info here! 

T&LHaskayne's curator insight, April 21, 12:59 PM

Check out the latest article from eLearning Industry!

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Thiagi - Games and Gamification: Unraveling the Terminology

Thiagi - Games and Gamification: Unraveling the Terminology | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Most people are confused about different terms associated with games and gamification. If you are one of them, you are likely to confuse your clients, participants, and audience members. Untangle the terminology so you can clearly communicate what you do and what you can do for others.

This week Thiagi and Monica will discuss how to:

Avoid confusion and misunderstanding when talking about games and gamification to your clients and participants.
Confidently differentiate between games and gamification and among different types of games and different types of gamification.
Specify different elements of games and different elements of gamification. Select the most appropriate elements to achieve a specific goal.
Clearly compare and contrast game design and gamification design. Identify the important similarities and differences between these two strategies.
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Making Games: The Ultimate Project-Based Learning

Making Games: The Ultimate Project-Based Learning | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Game making is one way to create a space where students are empowered to freely experiment with their own way of framing ideas and choosing perspectives. In this way, game making is tantamount to project-based learning.

Via Yashy Tohsaku, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 18, 8:59 AM

Here we go! Gotta get this started next year! 

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Is It Gamification, Or Game Based Learning? » Brain Based Learning

Is It Gamification, Or Game Based Learning? » Brain Based Learning | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

hese two terms get thrown around a lot, often interchangeably, but they’re not really the same. They’re both important concepts, and they’re both useful. However, they are useful in different contexts and that’s why I think it’s important to define each one.

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John Allen's curator insight, April 17, 3:24 PM

These are such important concepts but it's important to note the distinct differences when engaging in conversations around game based learning. 

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Gamification of a Project Based Learning Methodology for Professional Training

Gamification of a Project Based Learning Methodology for Professional Training | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Education and gamification go hand in hand, not only in a new technological environment, but also in an educational one as well.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 17, 9:59 AM

Interesting stuff! 

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Gnimmargorp | A world of spells gone awry

Gnimmargorp is a place, a game, and a class. In the physical world, it is a course called “Introduction to Programming.” During this course, we learn the fundamental skills of computer science, including algorithm use and development, critical analysis, data representation, base numbering systems, functions, troubleshooting, and much more.

gnimmargorpIn the game of Gnimmargorp, players take the roles of new spell casters who have volunteered to help with the major troubles in the land. They arrive and immediately start on quests designed to get them involved and engaged as quickly as possible. As they learn and then demonstrate their skills, they are given increasingly complex tasks.

Within the game, Gnimmargorp is a country beset by problems. The city of Esab serves as the capital and is the major center of population in Gnimmargorp. There are many other villages, but none approach the scale and scope of Esab, due to the influence of The Machine. It allowed this one city to grow far beyond the standard of the rest of the realm. Unfortunately, there seem to be serious problems with it of late.
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Match Game Mechanics: An exhaustive survey

Match Game Mechanics: An exhaustive survey | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
In his paper Swap Adjacent Gems to Make Sets of Three, Jesper Juul defines matching tile games as “video games where the object of the player is to manipulate tiles on a grid in order to create matches” (We give a more precise definition below to suit our terminology and structure we use here.)

Juul says that one of the challenges that designers face is that casual gamers want to pick up and play these games immediately. There must be a level of familiarity without a steep learning curve. At the same time, games need to have enough uniqueness to stand out from the competition, and more importantly, enough to keep the player playing their game. Often these differences are subtle, such as Bejeweled introducing a timeless mode to its predecessors.

Because of this, the evolution of match games has occurred more incrementally than some other types of games, and it has resulted in many similar games (often labeled clones). More importantly for us, it makes match games easier to analyze than many other game genres.
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eCampus News ASU Online to pilot environmental science games - eCampus News

eCampus News ASU Online to pilot environmental science games - eCampus News | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Within each of the five story-based games, students will take on several leadership roles, with increasing responsibility, to help a community address challenging environmental and sustainability issues.

Tahnja Wilson, senior manager for EdPlus at ASU, will guide the project. Wilson has taught online for more than 10 years. Her instructional design interests include gaming best practices and student/instructor engagement.

“I’m excited by how these authentic experiences will add a ‘human element’ to the learning process,” said Wilson. “The interactive features will be a great complement to the other course components.”
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