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A [brief] History of Serious Games

A [brief] History of Serious Games | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Check out this brief look at the history of serious games, by Designing Digitally, Inc.
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Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education
Using games and game strategies for enhancing learning in higher education settings.
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Eco Challenge - Water and Sustainability Game

Eco Challenge - Water and Sustainability Game | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Curtin University is proud to announce that it is the Australian organiser for participation in the  UNEP-DHI Eco Challenge 2015.

 

Water is essential for all life as we know it. A simple fact that sometimes feels forgotten as political and commercial interests take priority.

 

UNEP-DHI Eco Challenge 2015 provides an exciting and authentic learning experience for students aged 11-17 through the online strategic game "Aqua Republica". Addressing national curriculum priority dimensions of Sustainability and Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia the experience provides many learning opportunities across Social Studies, Science, Humanities, Health and Physical Education, English, Geography, and more.

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30 Facts About Gamification in eLearning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

30 Facts About Gamification in eLearning Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Over 75% people are gamers (50% casually and 27% moderately to fairly often).

Learners recall just 10% of what they read and 20% of what they hear. If there are visuals accompanying an oral presentation, the number rises to 30%, and if they observe someone carrying out an action while explaining it, 50%. But learners remember 90% “if they do the job themselves, even if only as a simulation.

Almost 80% of the learners say that they would be more productive if their university/institution or work was more game-like.Over 60% of learners would be motivated by leader boards and increased competition between students.89% would be more engaged win an e-learning application if it had point system.
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Tanyam's curator insight, December 8, 8:22 PM

I am not sure about the trustworthiness of the statistics quoted in this scoop, or the reliability of the quoted study.  However, I was interested in the section  on favorite gamification techniques as compared to less favorite gamification techniques.  This is a commercial company, and it is in their commercial interest to understand their market, so I suspect at least this part of the scoop may have some validity and usefulness for us if we are considering using gaming as a learning technique. T

Tanyam's curator insight, December 8, 8:25 PM

I am not sure about the trustworthiness of the statistics quoted in this scoop, or the reliability of the quoted study.  However, I was interested in the section  on favorite gamification techniques as compared to less favorite gamification techniques.  This is a commercial company, and it is in their commercial interest to understand their market, so I suspect at least this part of the scoop may have some validity and usefulness for us if we are considering using gaming as a learning technique. T

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10 splendide costruzioni in Minecraft

10 splendide costruzioni in Minecraft | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Su Minecraft gli utenti possono creare delle "custom map" e realizzare delle costruzioni che a volte sono davvero incredibili. Ve ne proponiamo dieci.

Via Mondivirtuali, David W. Deeds
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, December 1, 8:55 AM

Thanks to Mondi Virtuali.

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Gaming communities can self-police against bigotry, research shows

Gaming communities can self-police against bigotry, research shows | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, November 27, 1:10 PM


Keith Stuart:  "Games industry professionals can make gaming communities more tolerant by actively promoting and exhibiting inclusive values, according to new research. "

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2015 Games for Change Festival

2015 Games for Change Festival | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The G4C Festival is New York's largest gaming event and the premiere internationa gathering bringing together top game makers with social impact leaders
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, November 27, 9:08 AM

Thanks again to Kim Flintoff.

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Game Design in an Internet of Things | Coulton | Transactions of the Digital Games Research Association

Game Design in an Internet of Things | Coulton | Transactions of the Digital Games Research Association | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Game Design in an Internet of Things
Karen Miller's insight:

The paper considers the "emerging convergence between games and the Internet of Things. This can be seen in a growing number of games that use objects as physical game pieces to enhance the players’ interaction with virtual games."

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#Gamergate—and what it means for gaming in education | eSchool News | eSchool News

#Gamergate—and what it means for gaming in education | eSchool News | eSchool News | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Gamergate originally began as a hashtag in social media after an independent game developer’s ex-boyfriend made public allegations against her regarding a close relationship between the developer and a journalist in exchange for positive press, which was later proven false.

Since then, the controversy has escalated to reveal what many in the gaming industry say is a bias against women in gaming, evidenced not only by death and other malicious threats made against female game developers and female game players, but also by the male-heavy themes in many of today’s commercial games.

Considering that more classrooms and educators are now incorporating gaming into education, never has the controversy surrounding Gamergate and the bias toward women in gaming been more relevant in education, says gaming experts.

But to understand gaming’s standing in education, the gaming researchers and developers at MIT’s Education Arcade say that educators must first understand gaming in the context of an equal right’s movement.

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"You Play an Archaeologist"

"You Play an Archaeologist" | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Introduction A big part of archaeogaming is actually playing an archaeologist in a virtual space. For some gamers, that means role-playing as archaeologists in games not specifically designed with ...
Karen Miller's insight:

A great list of games where the central character is an archaeologist.

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Blasting zombies can be good for your brain, study says

Blasting zombies can be good for your brain, study says | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Blowing away enemy soldiers and aliens may be good for the brain, as researchers have found that fast-paced video games improve a player's learning ability. - New Zealand Herald

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, November 12, 4:51 PM

I guess the old rule of moderation holds true - some video games can be positive, but too much can be harmful. -Lon

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Let the kids play their video games, it's good for them!

Let the kids play their video games, it's good for them! | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
But, thanks to a growing body of research, momentum is building behind video games and their legitimacy as tools for learning.

"Research has found that video games encourage hands-on learning, critical thinking and collaboration," Dr Curwood said. "In addition to that, they motivate children and young adults to explore new content, develop new literacy skills and engage in self-directed learning, and this occurs both in school and out-of-school contexts."

The use of video games is covered in the new Australian curriculum and is recognised as an effective way of engaging students.

Bianca Hewes, an English teacher at Davidson High School, has introduced a video game elective for Year 9 students and next month the school will hold a video games appreciation day.
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Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 11, 2:00 AM

I have been doing some research in game-based learning and there is a lot to suggest that gaming has a positive effect on critical thinking and problem solving. As with anything, it it to be taken in moderation, but if it engages students we should be looking at ways in which inclusive and useful games can be incorporated into the curriculum. Even mining companies use game-based learning to help their employees become more motivated about  issues such as safety and risk assessment!

KidsIncSBTZ's curator insight, November 20, 11:32 PM

Imagination is Everything!

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Long-term study finds zero link between violence in video games and real life

Long-term study finds zero link between violence in video games and real life | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Long-term study finds zero link between violence in video games and real life

The first long-term study has been completed on the link between the consumption of violent media and real-life violent acts, and has found... there is none. In fact, the only possible trend that cropped up over the last century was that an increased consumption of violent video games correlated to a decrease in youth violence.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Source:

DOI: 10.1111/jcom.12129

 

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcom.12129/full

Abstract

This article presents 2 studies of the association of media violence rates with societal violence rates. In the first study, movie violence and homicide rates are examined across the 20th century and into the 21st (1920–2005). Throughout the mid-20th century small-to-moderate correlational relationships can be observed between movie violence and homicide rates in the United States. This trend reversed in the early and latter 20th century, with movie violence rates inversely related to homicide rates. In the second study, videogame violence consumption is examined against youth violence rates in the previous 2 decades. Videogame consumption is associated with a decline in youth violence rates. Results suggest that societal consumption of media violence is not predictive of increased societal violence rates.

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Prizewinning Educational Games from the Nobel Foundation

Prizewinning Educational Games from the Nobel Foundation | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Marie Curie, Martin Luther King Jr, Albert Einstein, Sir Alexander Fleming, Mother Teresa; all of these amazing individuals have one thing in common – winning the Nobel Prize. The Nobel Prize is one of the most highly regarded awards given to people working in the fields of literature, medicine, physics, chemistry, peace, and economics. But the Nobel Foundation is more than just an award giving Foundation, and has branched out into creating educational content related to the hard work done by Nobel Prize winners. Not only does their website contain video clips, documentaries, literature and history related to the winners, but it has over 29 interactive educational games for students to learn about key scientific, economic, literature and peace concepts.
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Bringing An Edge To The Next Generation Of Science Education - Gamification Co

Bringing An Edge To The Next Generation Of Science Education - Gamification Co | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Students sit through hours and hours of boring and unengaging lectures. Professors ramble on to an audience of students sleepily typing away on their smart phones while checking Facebook, Twitter and pretty much anything else that has nothing to do with the lecture. How do we fix this? Enter Labster! Founded in 2010, Labster (@labster) [...]
Karen Miller's insight:

Game-based learning techniques and real-life scenarios in a virtual environment.

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Free Technology for Teachers: 36 Online Games Kids Can Play to Learn About Engineering

Free Technology for Teachers: 36 Online Games Kids Can Play to Learn About Engineering | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Try Engineering is a site that hosts lesson plans and games designed to get students interested in engineering. The lesson plans, more than 100 of them, are arranged according age and engineering topic. The lesson plans can be downloaded as PDFs.

The games section of Try Engineering features 36 online games. Some of the games were developed specifically for Try Engineering while others are hosted on other educational sites like those of NASA and PBS. Like the lesson plans, the games collection cover a variety of topics including solar energy, space science, and bio-engineering.

The games section of Try Engineering also includes links to a dozen iPad apps that students can use to learn about engineering and programming.

Via John Evans
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The Science And The Benefits of Gamification In eLearning - eLearning Industry

The Science And The Benefits of Gamification In eLearning - eLearning Industry | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Gamification In eLearning: How Science Supports Gamification In eLearning and What are The Top 5 Benefits of Gamification In eLearning?
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12 board games to make you a better person

12 board games to make you a better person | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
From those that bring history to life, to others that can teach a thing or two about working together, tabletop games can teach all sorts of skills
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10 steps to promoting diversity in gaming | eSchool News | eSchool News

10 steps to promoting diversity in gaming | eSchool News | eSchool News | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The key to successfully using games for education, say experts, is in promoting a diverse “ecosystem” of gameplay complete with codes of conduct.
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, November 27, 9:06 AM

Thanks to Kim Flintoff.

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Playing with games at Curtin library

Playing with games at Curtin library | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
There’s no doubt that games can be very powerful learning tools, and at my institution, as at most higher education institutions, there is momentum to introduce games-based learning into the curric...
Karen Miller's insight:

Curtin Library's first steps to introduce games into the library 

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Twine, the Video-Game Technology for All

Twine, the Video-Game Technology for All | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The text-based creation tool has brought a new artistry — and a new diversity — to the medium.
Karen Miller's insight:

Very interesting article about Twine games which have "particularly encouraged the development of game mechanics that capture personal and emotional experiences". 

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The MindShift Guide to Digital Games and Learning

The MindShift Guide to Digital Games and Learning | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The MindShift Guide to Digital Games and Learning explains key ideas in game-based learning, pedagogy, implementation, and assessment. This guide makes sense of the available research and provides suggestions for practical use.

Via Maria Margarida Correia
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Filipe Cálix's curator insight, November 19, 5:38 AM

PDF aqui

http://www.kqed.org/assets/pdf/news/MindShift-GuidetoDigitalGamesandLearning.pdf

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 19, 6:16 PM

This has great implications for Humanities and Social Sciences teaching - gaming as learning.

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The 23 Best Game-Based Education Resources for 2014 | Edudemic

The 23 Best Game-Based Education Resources for 2014 | Edudemic | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Edudemic has covered game-based learning and gamification in the classroom on numerous occasions in the past. When learning becomes a game, it’s an enjoyable, effective experience for students and teachers alike. We’ve curated 23 of the best game-based education resources for 2014. If your class hasn’t gotten its game on yet, then now is the time.

 


Via John Evans
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Ricard Garcia's curator insight, November 17, 6:19 AM

The more background we have, the better the outcome!

Tony Guzman's curator insight, November 18, 3:04 PM

This article shares over 20 different game-based resources to help you get started with adding game elements into your courses. Have you added any of these to your courses already?

Luigina Sgarro's curator insight, December 5, 4:38 AM

Enjoy learning!

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Games creation as a process of authentic learning and assessment

Games creation as a process of authentic learning and assessment | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Forget playing the board games for now. The real learning and reinforcement comes from creating the game. If you think about how much high-level thinking goes into creating a fun, fair, and educational board game it’s easy to see why it hits so many Common Core standards.

Students need to thoroughly understand a work to be able to create questions about it. Creating questions and answers (W.9-10.7,8,9) involve citing specific evidence (W/RL.9-10.1), understanding the central idea/themes (RL.9-10.2), and analyzing events, characters, point of view, and structure of the story (RL.9-10.3,5) of a text. Students will often pull vocabulary from the story (RL.9-10.4) and create questions based on a text’s appearance in pop culture or other works from around the world (RL.9-10.6, 7,9). Once students create the easy, obvious questions for the game, the level of in-depth thinking and discussions students have when trying to create harder questions is impressive as are the debates I overhear them having about what makes a game educational, fair, and fun (SL.9-10.1). These debates have led to some great, whole-class discussions
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7 Tips to Producing Research-based Games

7 Tips to Producing Research-based Games | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Game developers often want to connect their game designs and mechanics to research that tests (and ideally confirms) their games actually do teach.

Via David W. Deeds
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, November 10, 8:50 AM

Good stuff! 

Chris Carter's comment, November 11, 7:41 PM
Yes! An article that combines research and practical tips on Game-Based Learning!
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Educational Games | Nobel Prize

Educational Games | Nobel Prize | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
You don't have to be a genius to understand the work of the Nobel Laureates. These games and simulations, based on Nobel Prize-awarded achievements, will teach and inspire you while you're having FUN!
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Games evangelists and naysayers

Games evangelists and naysayers | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Uncritical evangelism is unhelpful, and it only benefits those who are evangelising. “Play, don’t Replay!” is, on the surface, a grassroots online activity to raise awareness. I don’t doubt that this is exactly what McGonigal, with the best of intentions, sees it as. But it is also a means to crowdsource research via the free labour of trauma sufferers while drastically overstating the results of a single study in order to advance a personal agenda. Like any project, it demands scepticism and criticism; its positive intentions don’t exempt it. But dare ask a question about the methods or the science of the project and, no, you are merely a games naysayer.

Almost as a counterweight to the lawmakers and media personalities that use a single clinical trial to prove games are fundamentally evil, the evangelists use a single clinical trial to prove that games are fundamentally benevolent. “Play, don’t Replay!” is just another example of games evangelists twisting a study into a nail to advance their own hammer under the guise of saving the world, and it’s something that people should be cynical about.

If being a games naysayer means thinking critically about the place of games in society and not overreaching the findings of individual studies, I for one will gladly be a games naysayer.

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Online Business Simulations | OLT Project Site

Online Business Simulations | OLT Project Site | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

About

This project was funded by the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching to evaluate and promote pedagogies that enhance the learning outcomes of online simulations in business and related fields. Business simulations offer authentic learning experiences that mirror real world problems and enable students to practise and develop graduate capabilities, technical skills and strategic decision making skills. Emerging technologies along with increased bandwidth have created new opportunities for online simulations and provide improved flexibility and portability for students. However, online simulations are not effective unless they are embedded within a pedagogic framework that optimises learning outcomes. The resources provided by this project are designed to demystify the process of embedding an online simulation into the curriculum.

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