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Getting Played: Gamification, Bullshit and the Rise of Algorithmic Surveillance

Getting Played: Gamification, Bullshit and the Rise of Algorithmic Surveillance | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Gamification, the idea that game mechanics can be integrated into assumed “non-game” circumstances has gained ascendance
amongst champions of marketing, behavior change and efficiency. Ironically, some of the most heated critique of gamification
has come from the broader community of “traditional” videogame developers. Connecting broadly to projects surrounding “big
data” and algorithmic surveillance, the project of gamification continues to expand and intensify. This paper examines the
complex relationship between game designers and the rise of arguments in support of gamification. I analyze the various actors
and interests mobilizing arguments, deconstructing their underlying assumptions about the relationship between games and social
phenomena. Turning to an analytic framework rooted in the Assemblage of Play (Taylor 2009) and emergent coercive forms of
(played) control (Taylor 2006), the essay critiques assumptions on either side of the debate on the role of games and play. The
strained connections between debates on gamification and broader interest in serious games offers an important moment to
explore algorithmic surveillance.

Kim Flintoff's insight:

A challenging provocation that demands consideration by anyone working in the area.  Interesting piece challenging those of us working with gamification, learning analytics, MOOCs, etc...

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Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education
Using games and game strategies for enhancing learning in higher education settings.
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Eco Challenge - Water and Sustainability Game

Eco Challenge - Water and Sustainability Game | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Curtin University is proud to announce that it is the Australian organiser for participation in the  UNEP-DHI Eco Challenge 2015.

 

Water is essential for all life as we know it. A simple fact that sometimes feels forgotten as political and commercial interests take priority.

 

UNEP-DHI Eco Challenge 2015 provides an exciting and authentic learning experience for students aged 11-17 through the online strategic game "Aqua Republica". Addressing national curriculum priority dimensions of Sustainability and Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia the experience provides many learning opportunities across Social Studies, Science, Humanities, Health and Physical Education, English, Geography, and more.

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The Lure of Games and the Power of Networks

The Lure of Games and the Power of Networks | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Games are an integral part of transmedia storytelling, whether covert or user-created as discussed in the last chapter, or as an officially released aspect of the transmedia story. They may fill Jenkins’ principles of extractability with something to take home, immersion with a way to put oneself into the story and with performance as a way of engaging with or role playing in that transmedia world.

In the post-modern era, “narrative” has been applied to all aspects of life. “Narratives of the world are numberless,” declared French semiotician Roland Barthes. “…narrative is international, transhistorical, transcultural: it is simply there, like life itself.” Equally, games are coming to be perceived as everywhere, and as game theoretician Jan Simons, of the University of Amsterdam, described, “[Game theory] has found its way into research areas such as economics, political sciences, physical sciences, biology, psychology, law and the philosophy of ethics.” Everything is a story, and everything is a game, according to students of each mode of perceiving the world. These frequently debated points of view fit well with transmedia storytelling, which eagerly embraces both narrative and game as storytelling components.
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Why are games good for learning

Why are games good for learning | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

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callooh's curator insight, April 24, 2:26 PM

A good info graphic on the benefits of the potential  benefits of games when designed well.

Jerome Leleu's curator insight, April 27, 3:13 AM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

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Millions of People Around You Are Playing an Alternate Reality Game You Can't See

Millions of People Around You Are Playing an Alternate Reality Game You Can't See | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Ingress is like a giant game of Risk or Capture the Flag, only the game board is the entire world. The goal is to capture as many "portals," or in-game waypoints and locations, and hold them for your team for as long as possible.

Except unlike other mobile games, Ingress players — known as agents — have to run around city streets, parks, alleys and backcountry destinations in order to win. The game is played by millions of people, and if you're in a major metropolitan area, chances are that Ingress players are all around you.
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Adapting these game strategies to learning activities could transform site-based learning, discovery and collaboration....

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How Arizona State University plans to make the world a better place with video games - Phoenix Business Journal

How Arizona State University plans to make the world a better place with video games - Phoenix Business Journal | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
ASU’s Center for Games and Impact was founded in 2011 on the Tempe campus to bring people together to tackle game-infused solutions to solve society’s biggest challenges, said Kathryn Dutchin, the center’s creative producer.
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How gaming is becoming a classroom tool

How gaming is becoming a classroom tool | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
At first glance the idea of bringing digital games into the classroom might seem like a recipe for some kind of disaster involving a never-ending Candy Crush tournament. However, academic research into digital games and learning content shows that the two can happily co-exist, to the benefit of students of all ages.
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Can Video Games Solve Public Health Problems? - US News

Can Video Games Solve Public Health Problems? - US News | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Researchers are using video games and alternate universes to target issues ranging from cancer to teen pregnancy.
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Carolyn Scott’s Storybox Adventure Launched, Engaging Young People In Global Problem Solving | SERIOUS GAMES MARKET

Carolyn Scott’s Storybox Adventure Launched, Engaging Young People In Global Problem Solving | SERIOUS GAMES MARKET | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

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callooh's curator insight, April 27, 9:03 PM

A climate change education game that incorporates the SOLE method (Self-organized learning environment) and uses social learning to engage learners in climate change.

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Are video games the future of education ? | Spin | The Cri Science Pedagogy & Innovation News

Are video games the future of education ? | Spin | The Cri Science Pedagogy & Innovation News | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The Cri Science Pedagogy & Innovation News

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callooh's curator insight, May 21, 2:47 PM

Explore the development of a complex system, a "simple" unicellular organism.

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Iliad workshop: gamification and social media in teaching

Educators from the University of Southampton played the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Summit to see how game techniques and social media can enhance teaching. Part of the Iliad Education Innovation event series.
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Blending table top game approaches with social media interaction.

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Game On | The Mac Lab

Game On | The Mac Lab | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Gamify Your Curriculum

Educators request the features, students write the code, then we share it with the world.

Download Game On

Download our latest release from GitHub. Game On 2.0.0 was released on August 17, 2014.

Hack Our Code

Feeling even more adventurous? Join GitHub, create your own fork, and hack our code.

Game On PLN

Join our Game On PLN on the Adobe Ed Exchange and request new features.

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Call for Papers | Games and Learning Alliance Conference 2015 (Rome, Italy)

Call for Papers | Games and Learning Alliance Conference 2015 (Rome, Italy) | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

We are seeking original contributions that advance the state of the art in the technologies and knowledge available to support development and deployment of serious games. Experimental studies are strongly encouraged.

Please refer also to the Aims and scope section.

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New Research on Games and Classroom Assessment Practices

New Research on Games and Classroom Assessment Practices | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
A new report on the classroom uses of games describes promising practices for games and formative assessments.
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Can Serious Games bring playgrounds back to life? - ONSG

Can Serious Games bring playgrounds back to life? - ONSG | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Video games have increasingly replaced playgrounds. But are they the real enemy or are they their future? Serious Games are revolutioning the way we play!

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callooh's curator insight, June 30, 7:22 PM

The intersection of serious games and playground games

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The Role Video-Game Designers Never Thought They'd Have to Play

The Role Video-Game Designers Never Thought They'd Have to Play | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Students today often struggle to succeed in traditional schooling. Can games like Mario Kart and World of Warcraft enhance learning in America's classrooms?
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A Problem-Solving Game For Teachers and Administrators

A Problem-Solving Game For Teachers and Administrators | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
A simple game can bring educators together to talk about pain points and observations, and ultimately, find a solution.
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Using Video Games To Reconnect With A Lost Generation Of Male Learners - TeachThought

Using Video Games To Reconnect With A Lost Generation Of Male Learners - TeachThought | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
Video games continue to suffer from a juvenile connotation, but as Ali Carr Chellman explains, by looking at how video games engage the brain, we just might be able to re-connect with a lost generation of male learners.

Particularly interesting is her idea that video games are not a cause of academic turbulence, but an effect.

Many educators have already made up their mind about the role of video games in the classroom based on how they perceive video games themselves–i.e., violent, time-wasting, a distraction, etc. But viewing video games as a symbol of a fundamental disconnect between academia and male learners is something to think more about.

Via John Evans
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Kim Flintoff's comment, June 11, 1:53 AM
Thanks Pete - it blends into the video quite well.. I like the Rob Zombie version of the trailer: https://youtu.be/noadTYzXY6o
Kim Flintoff's comment, June 11, 1:59 AM
And the Parkour version is gripping: https://youtu.be/S8b1zWOgOKA
Scott Holcomb's curator insight, June 11, 4:26 PM

Did someone just say "video game?" :)

 

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Brown U Uses Minecraft To Train Robots -- Campus Technology

Brown U Uses Minecraft To Train Robots -- Campus Technology | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The researchers discovered that they could use the videogame Minecraft, a virtual world made up of three-dimensional blocks where players can gather resources and build or destroy structures to accomplish goals, to test the algorithm. The researchers created a tiny space in Minecraft and a character controlled by the algorithm, and then let the algorithm complete a task in the game through the process of trial and error. Once the algorithm had discovered the priors, the researchers placed it in a novel Minecraft space. "Indeed, the researchers showed that, armed with priors, their Minecraft agents could solve problems in unfamiliar domains much faster than agents powered by standard planning algorithms," stated a news release from the university.
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Why Are We Biased Against Games for Learning? | Doug Levin | EdTech Strategies

Why Are We Biased Against Games for Learning? | Doug Levin | EdTech Strategies | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The topic of games for learning is garnering more widespread attention than it ever has, thanks in no small part to high-profile evangelism from folks as prominent as those at the White House and U.S. Department of Education on the one hand and USA Today’s national K-12 education reporter Greg Toppo (who recently wrote The Game Believes in You: How Digital Play Can Make Our Kids Smarter) on the other. I’m not a Johnny-come-lately to this conversation or community and, yes, I’m a gamer (who both plays with and learns from other educators while gaming). There is significant learning happening in games, important instructional design implications to draw from game design, and very real potential here for broader impact.
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As Jeopardy! Robot Watson Grows Up, How Afraid of It Should We Be? ~ New York Magazine : by Benjamin Wallace-Wells

As Jeopardy! Robot Watson Grows Up, How Afraid of It Should We Be? ~ New York Magazine : by Benjamin Wallace-Wells | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

"Watson has now been trained in molecular biology and finance, written a cookbook, been put to work in oil exploration. It is learning to help solve crimes. This fall, Wired aired predictions that Watson would soon be the world’s most perfect medical diagnostician. It has folded so seamlessly into the world that, according to IBM, the Watson program has been applied in 75 industries in 17 countries, and tens of thousands of people are using its applications in their own work. In these experiences, Watson has functioned as an early probe into the relationship between humans and intelligent machines — what we need from them, what gaps they fill, what fears they generate.

 

"The honest way into philosophy is by accident, through the disorienting flash of a new experience. Watson’s creators, many of whom have worked on the project since its inception, talk about their machine ­differently than Tegmark does. They see a chronology of experiences, of developing skills and propulsive failures, as if the machine had its own biography. Some of them describe their experience with Watson in more personal terms, as if they were the parent and the machine the child. Last October, IBM moved the project into a new home, a foreboding office tower that inscribes shadows over Astor Place, which has given Watson a neat, humanlike path through time: Its early years spent in a family atmosphere in the suburbs; then an educational course to prepare it to support itself in a more complicated world; then, to make money, a move to the East Village and a search for employment. It has also meant that it is possible to leave your office, as I did one recent afternoon, walk across lower Manhattan, take an elevator upstairs, situate yourself before a stadium of screens, notice what looks like a small stack of hard drives in the corner, contemplate the human place in the scheme of things, and hear a placid computerized voice say, “Hello, Watson here. What are we working on today?”


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Serious Games for Serious Pharmacy Education

Serious Games for Serious Pharmacy Education | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

 "Student Preferences on Gaming Aspects for a Serious Game in Pharmacy Practice Education: A Cross-Sectional Study,"


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callooh's curator insight, May 14, 2:17 PM

Probably not surprising--there's a thirst for game-based learning. Interesting that students indicated a preference for a fantasy environment and 3D environments.

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The Stanley Parable - On Serious Games

The Stanley Parable - On Serious Games | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
The Stanley Parable is one of the most innovative games of the last years. It challenges your mind, contradicting everything you have previously known or heard about video games, making you play with the rules, and not by them. Do you have the opportunity of making real choices at games or at life? Never mind. To play or not to play: that’s the only question.

Stanley is introduced to us as an office worker with no other task than to push buttons in a determinate order. One day, his computer shut down and he has to think and start to figure out what is going on. Here starts the challenge: will you follow the narrator’s rules or will you experience alternative ways? But, if every action has a reaction already expected by the game designers, do you actually have a choice at any point at all? The only real choice would be to not play.
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Video Game Lets Healthy Users Experience Alzheimer's

Video Game Lets Healthy Users Experience Alzheimer's | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Forget-Me-Knot, designed by a univeristy student, is intended to raise awareness of Alzheimer's and dementia by letting people know what it feels like.


Via callooh
Kim Flintoff's insight:

Perhaps games like this can be used in health sciences to foster clinical empathy?

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callooh's curator insight, May 12, 7:26 PM

Forget-Me-Knot is designed to raise awareness for those suffering with dementia. "Through playing Forget-Me-Knot the player gets an immediate sense of the confusion the character feels,"

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Game Design Across the Curriculum: Students as Designers (Part 1) | Educator Innovator

Game Design Across the Curriculum: Students as Designers (Part 1) | Educator Innovator | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

In “Game Design Across the Curriculum: Students as Designers,” the state of games in education begins the discussion. Larry Cocco, co-founder of the Games4Ed initiative, covers its inception and purpose, as well as the Games for Learning Summit. Cocco, Matthew Farber, and Steve Isaacs attended the event in New York City in April.

Students as game designers is the focal point of this webinar series. To this end, game jams is the focus of this first discussion. Like hackathons, game jams task designers with creating games in a short time period based on a challenge or a theme. In October 2014, the White House hosted its first game jam, inviting designers from around the country. Kevin Miklasz initiated the Moveable Game Jam, which brings the concept to students. He talks about challenges, the guide he published, and the Quest to Learn Game Jam. Matthew Farber discusses his use of tabletop game jams in his middle school social studies classes, as well as his digital game jams in the after school club he advises, and Steve Isaacs talks about his use of game jams in his middle school video game design class.

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Empowering Educators: Supporting student progress in the classroom with digital games.

Empowering Educators: Supporting student progress in the classroom with digital games. | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it
TThere is growing interest in the use of digital games as part of K-12 teachers’ classroom instruction. For example, in Washington State, legislation is being considered to create a pilot program for integrating games into the school curriculum. And in the fall of 2014, the White House and U.S. Department of Education hosted a game jam 2 to encourage and promote the development of learning games. As with all educational technologies, the most frequently asked question is, “Do they work?” The answer — and the question itself — is complex. Work for what purpose? To help students learn? Learn what? Core content knowledge or 21st century skills? Or is the purpose to engage students? In comparison to what? As with all   educational technologies, the real answer to any of these questions is, “It depends.” It depends on lots of factors, including the features of the game and, most importantly, what teachers do with those features as part of their instruction.
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Gamindex

Gamindex | Games, gaming and gamification in Higher Education | Scoop.it

Gamindex focuses on bringing games to education through game reviews written for teachers.  Each review features a summary, benefits to the game, challenges for implementation, and ideas for class use.  You can also search for that perfect game based on your content area, gaming platform, and other information.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 8, 8:17 AM

A really useful resource for those interested in game based learning.

Mónica Beloso's curator insight, May 9, 9:39 AM

añada su visión ...

Sally Reeve's curator insight, May 19, 7:35 AM

Useful guide to games that could be used in teaching. Searching limited to one category at a time though so not easy to refine the search. Very US orientated and aimed  mostly at school pupils rather than students or adults. Good for getting overview of various games and possible uses.