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How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names

How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
Here's a little more Canadian history on this Canada Day.    

Via AP US History, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks, Seth Dixon
English Gallery's insight:

Great for a little extra look at toponyms

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:20 AM

I'm a little late for Canada Day, but the information about the origins of the names of all the Provinces and Territories is great information any time of year. 


Tags: Canada, toponyms, historical, trivia.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:42 AM

Like Seth said - a little late for Canada Day, but we can certainly use in our World Geography  unit on North America.   

 

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:07 PM

Toponyms

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Geography in the News: The Growth of Megacities

Geography in the News: The Growth of Megacities | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM Megacities’ Expansive Growth For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived…

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 26, 5:39 PM

Interesting article about the demographic shift to urban environments - megacities

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 8:04 PM

APHG-U7

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Not just Spike Lee's Brooklyn: Gentrification spurs tensions nationwide

Not just Spike Lee's Brooklyn: Gentrification spurs tensions nationwide | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
While Spike Lee's rant shone a light on gentrification in Brooklyn, cities across the U.S. grapple with similar tensions as historically minority areas change.
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NYTimes: The Geography of Food

NYTimes: The Geography of Food | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
It’s a myth that chips are cheaper than broccoli. They’re not. So what’s stopping people from eating more healthfully?

 

Is junk food really cheaper?  Is that economic factor the only one that has led to increasingly obesity rates in the Unites States?  What about cultural changes to families' division of labor within the house?  Agricultural changes in production as well as urban systems of consumption all play a role in this complex system.  Economics, culture, urban and agriculture are all interconnected in this article.    


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's comment, September 25, 2011 10:44 PM
For a while now I've been thinking about this issue since I may or may not have had my obesity issue to deal with (okay, I did). People that say "it's society's fault" f...ail to own up to their personal responsibility and fail to recognize that we are "things to act, not things to be acted upon." At the same time, those that pretend that is is 100% about individual choices fail to account for the social context and the structural situations that lead to so many Americans falling into the same unhealthy patterns. That many people means the problem is both structural (a societal issue) and individual. I guess it isn't a surprise that a geographer thinks that the issue is present on multiple scales is it?

As a follow up, you can read a CNN article about economical ways to address healthy living in the poor urban environment. http://www.cnn.com/2011/HEALTH/09/15/cnnheroes.keatley.nutrition/
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 2:31 PM

A great article about the food chrsis going on in america. When looking at this fast food trend as a whole its effects extend greatly across the ecnomy. First off the fact that there are 15 fast food resturants to every grochary store is so obsured beacuse studys have proven it cost less to buy food at the store and cook it at home then to eat out at fast food resturants, but who are the poeple eating out at BK the low income familys. Also the fact that such a large amount of food i need to prodce the deamand it has effeced the agrucltual ecnomy beacuse if farmes want to be able to sell there potatos in bulk to these restuansts, they have to  be grown a certain way. So it not just one cheep meal here and there it consistant meals at places like these that has begun to reshape the ecnomy and agruclutral market.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 2:10 AM

The biggest excuse for obese Americans today is that junk food is cheaper than healthy food. This is actually false now that i read this article. They even use the example that if you go to McDonalds for dinner and got burgers, chicken nuggest, fries, and sodas it would cost 28.00. Or you can serve a roasted chicken, vegetables, salad, and milk for 14.00. So there is one example of how that stereotype is false. I understand there are things that you can buy that are healthy that are expensive but that is what comes with everything.

 

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How people in Muslim countries prefer women to dress in public

How people in Muslim countries prefer women to dress in public | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
Even as publics in many of the surveyed Muslim-majority countries express a clear preference for women to dress conservatively, many also say women should be able to decide for themselves what to wear.

Via Seth Dixon
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Mr. Lavold's curator insight, January 18, 12:35 PM

We've been discussing the Quebec Charter of Values and the limits it places on diversity in the Quebec landscape. Isn't it interesting that such legal limitations do not exist in many of the Muslim countries around the world.

mjonesED's curator insight, January 18, 5:02 PM

For our colleagues who might be traveling in the middle east.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2:57 PM

I am not sure if it is because I am an independently raised western woman but this whole article seems to completely address women as property.  I realize that some countries are much stricter than others but it is not something I can comprehend.

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Devolution: A Beginner's Guide

Devolution: A Beginner's Guide | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
What is devolution and how has it changed how Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales are governed?

 

This article with videos, charts and images was designed as a primer for UK voters for the 2010 election to understand who devolution in Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland were reshaping the political landscape in the United Kingdom.  It is general enough that even though it is outdated as a news story, it serves as a concrete example from geography students to understand the processes and reasons for a decentralization of political power.


Via Seth Dixon
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chris tobin's curator insight, March 22, 2013 4:23 PM

Here is an article March 2013 updating the latest in Wales

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-politics-21683771

 

"Silk Commission:  Mixed Reaction Over Devolution Power" 3/16/2013 BBC

 

     Since 1997 there have been many changes in the devolution processes Westminster still holds the most governing decisions but it seems that the UK taxpayers do not want their money to go to other countries for public services. 

Railing is a big issue since there have been alot of plans for improving infrastructure in transportation to build up the economy.  This will be particularly interesting to follow in the news.

     Liberal Democrat Leader Kirsty Williams stated a need for a new model of devolution  with clear definitions and the Conservative Lib. Dem. coalition's 114 page document to the Silk Commission states policing, broadcasting, and energy projects should remain under Westminster but to devolve teachers pay and rail franchises.

 

 

 

    

    

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, October 6, 2013 9:51 PM

The devolution of the United Kingdom is taking place at a legistlative level right now- if/when will Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland vote to actually secede? The article made mention that people in Britain are starting to get angry that they are subsidizing programs in Scotland that the English pay for themselves. What are the benefits to being a part of the United Kingdom? What's the best balance of power for all involved?

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:21 PM

This shift can reshape the countries in many ways, financially, and the over all quality of life. A place will do better with connections than standing alone. This may help with international relation issues and build new relationships. When places depend on one another it can reshape the Country. It can also help with investment and jobs. 

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Cartography And Conflict

Cartography And Conflict | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
A newly issued Chinese passport featuring a map that lays claim to disputed territory with several neighboring countries is only the latest case of cartographic aggression.

 

"Maps, like statistics, can lie — or at least tell only one side of the story. As often as not, they can belie the level of actual governmental control or the ethnic and social realities on the ground. And competing views over 'who owns what' invariably fuel nationalistic fervor."


Via Seth Dixon
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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:22 PM

Maps can lie, or at least only tell one side of a story. China sparked an international uproar over their new passports that features a map of China. The map includes territories claimed by India, Vietnam, the Philippines and Taiwan.

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Exclaves and Sovereignty

Exclaves and Sovereignty | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

"Prime Minister David Cameron is 'seriously concerned' about the escalation of tensions on the border between Spain and the British territory of Gibraltar."


Via Seth Dixon
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karenpinney's curator insight, August 12, 2013 5:13 AM

Relationships between Britain and Spain.

megan b clement's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:37 AM

"The video explains about Spain and Gibraltar and how they have feuded back and forth with one another and their borders for some time now. Gibraltar has made a articfical reef to mess with the Spainish fisherman and SPain has made travel to Gibraltar nearly impossible and dreadfully long for tourists. Spain understands how essential tourism is to their economy. Until they are able to come to an agreement thei matter is only going to intenisfy more and worsen."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 10:55 AM

I was unaware that the UK owned this part of Gibraltar.  It seems like a throwback to the UK’s naval policies of the past that they would still to control this point of entry into the Mediterranean.  It will be interesting to see how this will be resolved.  As it is a dispute between two countries that are both part of the EU. 

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Walled World

Walled World | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

Via Seth Dixon
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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 9:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 6:51 PM

Walls are a symbol of political boundaries and motives, usually intended to keep certain people in or out. This website in particular clearly highlights this idea in human geography as it explores the various walls that mark our landscape and thus contribute to changing policies and borders. Walls can also affect the landscape, not just mark it, as an effect of asserting either political dominance or border policies, as best seen by the resulting environmental results that come from it and the displacement of people (as seen on Palestinian-Israeli border). 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

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The Crazy Pidgin Language That Unites Africa's Megacity

The Crazy Pidgin Language That Unites Africa's Megacity | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

Finding a common linguistic ground in a city of 20 million and 500 languages.  A pidgin language evolves in the melting pot of Lagos, Nigeria.


Via Allison Anthony
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allAfrica.com: Nigeria: Indigenous Languages Endangered As National Identity Fades Away (Page 1 of 2)

allAfrica.com: Nigeria: Indigenous Languages Endangered As National Identity Fades Away (Page 1 of 2) | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

Today, many indigenous languages have become endangered and would probably go into extinction if nothing is done to save the situation. The young people who are supposed to champion the preservation of the indigenous languages are mostly not in tune with their native dialects.

English language has become the language in many homes to the detriment of the indigenous language. Saturday Vanguard spoke with some young adults to find out their proficiencies in their mother tongue.

Sylvester Azubuike, a 16 year old, graduate from Okota Grammar School told Saturday Vanguard:

"I don't speak my indigenous language because my parents didn't speak the language to me while I was growing up. I know speaking my language very well would have helped me a lot and perhaps I would have had something to give to my own children in future. My advice to other parents is to teach their children their indigenous language because it gives them identity."


Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 2:34 PM

Today, many indigenous languages have become endangered and would probably go into extinction if nothing is done to save the situation. The young people who are supposed to champion the preservation of the indigenous languages are mostly not in tune with their native dialects.

English language has become the language in many homes to the detriment of the indigenous language. Saturday Vanguard spoke with some young adults to find out their proficiencies in their mother tongue.

Sylvester Azubuike, a 16 year old, graduate from Okota Grammar School told Saturday Vanguard:

"I don't speak my indigenous language because my parents didn't speak the language to me while I was growing up. I know speaking my language very well would have helped me a lot and perhaps I would have had something to give to my own children in future. My advice to other parents is to teach their children their indigenous language because it gives them identity."

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Algherese Catalan on the Endangered Languages UN list

Algherese Catalan on the Endangered Languages UN list | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

How many endangered languages are there in the World and what are the chances they will die out completely?

This week the Guardian reported that the last two fluent speakers of the language Ayapaneco aren't speaking to each other.

This poignant story got us thinking about the number of endangered languages in the World.

To get to the bottom of this we turned to United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO), who regularly publish a list of endangered languages...


Via @AngloCatalans
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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


Via Seth Dixon
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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders

It's Complicated: 5 Puzzling International Borders | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

"Most of us think of international borders as invisible, but clear-cut lines: stand on one side, and you’re in one country; stand on the other, you’re in another country.  But here’s a list of five international borders that, for one reason or another, are not quite that simple."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2013 9:20 AM

This article is in dire needs of some maps, but it still provides 5 intriguing case studies of borders and chunks of territory that defy normal categorization.


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, July 13, 2013 12:53 PM

It  is  Puzzling, but  every  human  being  chose to live in a normal,  happy  and  free  country, in a  Democratie,  if  possible.

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 7:20 PM

These borders and boundaries indicate something that I thought of while rewatching Independence Day (the Smith/Goldblum flick from '96)...  If we make a mess, and destroy this planet, aliens wouldn't want it.  The land that no one wants, is probably wanted by someone in reality... I am a fervent believer in aliens, and spend my free time diving into attempts to solve my quandary about the higher questions of the universe.  I think that the area that no one wants, everyone wants.  Unlike state boundaries in the US, planets are divided as separate entities from other planets, but grouped in solar systems, galaxies, asteroid belts, etc... I can't wait for the day some pompous fool gets on the bridge of a starship from Earth and sits in the captain's chair and says "Lieutenant, take us to Sector ----- (so and so)"... We will have moved up from the United States and Canada to the United Sectors of Galaxies!  And that little bit of land that 'no one wants,' everyone actually wants... same with planets.  Terraforming will allow those unsightly balls of fury that float around a star to become the most inhabitable of them all!  I wonder where these things will stop... or if it keeps going to larger sectors, endlessly? Well, we will likely encounter other species with territorial claims... play nice, America!  Or the Aliens will pop out of your stomach.  Though there are some politicians now that seem to have popped out of someone's stomach, I think the threat is more domestic while territory disputes occur nowadays, as it is humans arguing with humans, but it will increase when the Martians come to claim what is theirs.

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Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea

Why the Plan to Dig a Canal Across Nicaragua Could Be a Very Bad Idea | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

"By the end of this year, digging could begin on a waterway that would stretch roughly 180 miles across Nicaragua to unite the Atlantic and Pacific oceans."


Via Seth Dixon
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Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 23, 11:50 AM

This article discusses the many problems with building a canal through Nicaragua. While it would have many economic benefits, like boosting Nicaragua's economy and transporting ships too large for the Panama canal, it would seem there are even more downsides. The nature of the deal between China and Nicaragua is unclear and suspicious, and the project could have many negative environmental impacts. This paired with the fact that this idea has failed many times before make the idea of a Nicaraguan canal sound like it would cause more harm than good.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 7:52 PM

China constructing a canal that stretches through Nicaragua would give the country an economic boost that would be helpful to keep it afloat. While building a canal may seem like a great idea on paper, the construction would reap untold consequences on the surrounding lakes and bodies of water, as well as the land in Nicaragua.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 17, 1:42 PM

In my opinion this shouldn’t be done because that lake is the source of the Nicaraguan drinking water. For the economy of the country this canal can be a big help as well as for china but if it mean taking away their water supplies then this is not a good idea. But I guess that the world is changing and china with a better route of shipping will be a good thing for our society.  

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Afghanistan's Opium Wars - National Geographic Magazine

Afghanistan's Opium Wars - National Geographic Magazine | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
A key step to securing peace will be to wean Afghan farmers off growing poppies.
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Geography of Food

Geography of Food | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

The Geography of Food looks at the global pattern of food production and consumption. It reveals a complex pattern of global connections. The map of the Geography of food shows a pattern that...


Via Marta Maggi
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The mystery of the Basques

The ancient Basque culture has survived against the odds.

 

The Basques are an intriguing cultural group to study in part because of their linguistic distinctness is Europe (Basque is a non-Indo-European language) but also because they strive for greater political autonomy within Spain.  This video could be used when teach about folk cultures, language, devolution, heritage as well as within a regional context. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Kmcordeiro670's comment, February 2, 2012 5:15 PM
The CNT remains one of the organized labor organizations in Spain which adheres to the autonomy of Basque as declared in the Second Spanish Republic and the Revolutionary Republic. Thank for posting this and helping revive this wonderful culture. If globalization has contracted space parallel to time, can we through our actions and struggle revive what time may have lost through our new form of connectedness?
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Flag wars

Flag wars | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

"Mr Füzes had voiced support for the Székler people, a group of ethnic Hungarians who live in Transylvania, after two Romanian counties banned the display of the Székler flag (pictured above with men in hussar uniform) on public buildings. Zsolt Nemeth, Hungary’s state secretary for foreign affairs, described the ban as an act of “symbolic aggression” and called for local councils in Hungary to show solidarity by flying the Székler flag from town halls. The Hungarian government then raised the Székler flag above Parliament, further enraging Bucharest..."


Via Seth Dixon
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Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:26 AM
The past is the past. Or is it? The past seems to mean more to the people of Hungary and Romania these days. The Treaty of Trianon of 1920 sectioned the region of Transylvania from Romania to Hungary. For the ethnic Hungarians living in Transylvania, this posed quite the issue. For many people around the world, the homeland does not always match up with geopolitical boundaries of the country that they live in. While this identity crisis causes conflict for many groups of people all over the world, in Hungary the fight to regain greater-Hungary continues today.
This article also poses interesting questions of voting and citizenship. The Hungarian government granted citizenship beyond its borders, and jurisdiction, to ethnic Hungarians in Romania. What does this say about those Hungarians in Romania? Does it bring Hungary any closer to regaining the borders of the once Greater Hungary? Regardless of the questions of citizenship, such public and federal efforts to expand their borders and regain their ethnic population and homeland is doing more then turning heads. Look to this region for future conflict because the failure of geopolitical nations to represent ethnic homelands rarely ends peacefully.
John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:37 AM
This article helps to illustrate tensions that can be caused by seemingly simple acts within a society that is home to two conflicting groups. While flags do not have any actual influence or power in society, they are a source of emotion, and pride in ones nation and heritage. Because of the emotion that is tied with flags, it can be a very tense situation when the use of these flags is banned, or if these flags are taken down or destroyed. It is amazing how something so simple as a flag can bring about so much anger, and be the source of such bad blood and violence between different nations or ethnic groups. In the example given, there has been conflict for years, which was recently fueled even more over the use of a flag. While the act of displaying a flag is simply a display of loyalty, the actions of the Romanian government against this practice shows how although it is not a violent act, it can lead to very hostile actions and interactions.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:12 PM
This article got me thinking. The tensions between Hungary and Romania seem trivial to me. The Romanians are the right ones in my opinion and the act of displaying the Székler flag about the Hungarian Parliament was plainly a theoretical middle finger to Romania. The more than a million Hungarians living in present day Romania relates to our unit on culture and nations/states. There is a Hungarian nation of people in Romania that the Hungarian government has now granted rights to, again purposely antagonizing Romania, and Romania is rightfully concerned of their dual-loyalty. Overall, the situation is taken way out of proportion by Hungary and what former piece of an empire wants that flag flown in their country. In Ireland do you see the Union Jack… that’d be a no.
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Northern Ireland flag riots 'threatening jobs'

Northern Ireland flag riots 'threatening jobs' | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
The riots linked to flag protests in Northern Ireland are causing "significant damage" to the economy, the secretary of state warns.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 11, 2013 2:01 PM

Flags are tangible symbols of communal identity and political power.  If the meaning behind these identities are unresolved, the symbols of these identities in public spaces becomes all the more there is contentious.  Currently, the Union Jack is a lightning rod for controversy in Northern Ireland and the riots stemming from this are harming the local economy. 


Tags: Ireland, political, conflict, devolution, autonomy, economic, Europe, unit 4 political.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 11:39 AM

This article shows that no matter how small the world is becoming nationalism is still present and will cause issues between different factions and supporters of different national identities.  The issue over what flag will be flown in a country can spark outrage and anger not by people against the flag but the people for it as they feel it should be flown all the time as opposed to a limited amount of days in the year.

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Moving Capital Cities

Moving Capital Cities | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

"A comprehensive listing of world capital cities that have moved from one city to another."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 24, 2013 5:12 PM

What happens when a country moves it's capital city?  Why would a country choose to move it's capital?  This list (with some short historic and geographic context) helps answer those questions. 

The Rice Process's curator insight, November 24, 2013 9:52 PM

Great resource!

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:39 PM

Over the years countries have moved their major capitols from one area of their country to another. They move their capitol cities to try to please the people and reform. By moving the capitol cities it causes more growth and development which can lead to the area being more populated. 

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‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’

‘How to Build a Country From Scratch’ | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
The filmmakers present a 12-step program to establish the world’s newest country: South Sudan.

Via Seth Dixon
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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:54 PM

If I was to create my own country, the first thing I'd do is make sure not to shoot down any U.N. helicopters. This video does show the very hard process of creating a country from scratch.  I particularly enjoy the piece in which a government official attempts to explain taxes to folks at the marketplace because I probably had the same expression when taxes were first explained to me. "Why should I pay the government my hard earned money? They didn't do anything to earn it from me."

 

Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 12:51 PM

This is a really interesting dynamic to look into, as it's not everyday the process of founding a country can be seen at work. That's a true once in a lifetime experience for those involved, and is likely one of the harder jobs in the entirety of history.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 10:46 AM

This video and article highlight the steps a new country takes when it is carved out of an old one.  The problems and tribulations the new country faces and how it responds to the rest of the international community will decide if it will be a long lasting country or just a blip on the road of the original countries history.

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Pidgins and Creoles: The Formation of Nonstandard Language

Pidgins and Creoles: The Formation of Nonstandard Language | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

What do popular English colloquialisms like “long time no see”, “lose face”, and “no can do” have in common? Far from neologisms, these simple, staccato utterances all originated centuries ago as a means of facilitating trade between the English and Chinese. Beginning in the 17th century, as English merchants crossed the Indian Ocean and sailed upwards through the South China Sea, they met with their Asian counterparts and, out of necessity, developed a means of communication that melded English words with Chinese sentence structure. The result was a pidgin language that would be the mercantile lingua franca for over two centuries.

Pidgin languages – originally a business vernacular – are characterized by a limited vocabulary, simplified grammar and syntax, and an unfussy disregard for subject-verb agreement. Allegedly, the name comes from the mispronunciation of the word “business” by those selfsame Mandarin speakers that introduced so many colorful phrases into everyday English. While a rudimentary sort of communication was necessary, Chinese merchants of the 17th and 18th centuries held the English language in low esteem and did not feel compelled to learn it fully. The 19th century, however, saw an upswell in English-language education as pidgin came to be viewed as degrading.

Pidgin languages are nobody’s native tongues. They arise out of necessity and survive so long as they are needed. Examples of pidgin languages exist in several African


Via Charles Tiayon
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Lost in Translation: Saving Europe's Endangered Languages

Lost in Translation: Saving Europe's Endangered Languages | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it

My a'th kar! Unless you speak Cornish, these words are unlikely to make your heart skip a beat. There is no shortage of minority languages in the UK. In addition to Cornish, you can hear Welsh, Scots, Manx, Alderney French, Guernsey French, Jersey French as well as Scottish Gaelic .

However, their future is far from certain. Throughout Europe dozens of languages are on life support, with some 120 believed to be dying out. Worldwide every few weeks a language dies. So what can be done?

The European Parliament believes that the last word on these languages has yet to be said. On 12 September they will vote on a report by French MEP François Alfonsi with suggestions on how to support endangered languages.

"Linguistic diversity is the soul of the European construction," he explained. "There are hundreds of languages in the European Union and each is a part of the European identity."

 


Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 10:50 AM

My a'th kar! Unless you speak Cornish, these words are unlikely to make your heart skip a beat. There is no shortage of minority languages in the UK. In addition to Cornish, you can hear Welsh, Scots, Manx, Alderney French, Guernsey French, Jersey French as well as Scottish Gaelic .

However, their future is far from certain. Throughout Europe dozens of languages are on life support, with some 120 believed to be dying out. Worldwide every few weeks a language dies. So what can be done?

The European Parliament believes that the last word on these languages has yet to be said. On 12 September they will vote on a report by French MEP François Alfonsi with suggestions on how to support endangered languages.

"Linguistic diversity is the soul of the European construction," he explained. "There are hundreds of languages in the European Union and each is a part of the European identity."

 
Notes Taker's curator insight, September 9, 2013 3:44 PM

Perhaps from "lost in translation", the endangered languages can find new life when they are being translated/interpreted into major languages, for the outside world. "Revived in Translation" may be a better title.

Rescooped by English Gallery from Geography Education
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Bizarre Borders


Via Seth Dixon
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Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 9:46 AM

Did you know the geometric boundary between US and Canada (the longest border in the world) is also a physical border? Check it out.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, October 5, 8:45 PM

This video shows how political geography does not always match up perfectly with physical geography, showing how the "no-touching zone" between the US and Canada has led to several border irregularities. It's very interesting to see how a seemingly straight border on a map is actually an odd and irregular jagged line that defines the political boundary. 

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, October 20, 9:49 AM

I really like CGPGrey's explaination of the borders between Canada and the US. It does however make me wonder how all 5,500 miles of it are patroled? Also having my kids go back and forth four times a day to go to school sounds a bit  much.

Rescooped by English Gallery from Geography Education
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How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names

How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names | Gallery's Geo Nuggets | Scoop.it
Here's a little more Canadian history on this Canada Day.    

Via AP US History, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks, Seth Dixon
English Gallery's insight:

Great for a little extra look at toponyms

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:20 AM

I'm a little late for Canada Day, but the information about the origins of the names of all the Provinces and Territories is great information any time of year. 


Tags: Canada, toponyms, historical, trivia.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:42 AM

Like Seth said - a little late for Canada Day, but we can certainly use in our World Geography  unit on North America.   

 

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:07 PM

Toponyms