Gaia Diary
Follow
Find
1.0K views | +0 today
Scooped by Mariaschnee
onto Gaia Diary
Scoop.it!

The Only Volcano on Earth You Can Explore From The Inside

The Only Volcano on Earth You Can Explore From The Inside | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it

Over the years, we’ve all seen some pretty amazing photographs of volcanoes – from epic eruption shots with rivers of bubbling lava, to more peaceful images of dormant volcanoes and water-filled craters. In fact, the only perspective we don’t see very often is what a volcano looks like from the inside. Obviously, few people would be crazy enough to explore the interior of an active volcano, and even dormant volcanoes are normally inaccessible as they tend to be plugged up with solidified lava. Thrihnukagigur volcano in Iceland is the only known exception.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Gaia Diary
“The more we nurture the planet, the better and more natural a life we'll have.” ― Chris d'Lacey, Icefire
Curated by Mariaschnee
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Carl Sagan - Pale Blue Dot

It is sometimes said that scientists are unromantic, that their passion to figure out robs the world of beauty and mystery. But is it not stirring to understand how the world actually works — that white light is made of colors, that color is the way we perceive the wavelengths of light, that transparent air reflects light, that in so doing it discriminates among the waves, and that the sky is blue for the same reason that the sunset is red? It does no harm to the romance of the sunset to know a little bit about it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

NOAA Ocean Explorer: NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer: All Live Streams

NOAA Ocean Explorer: NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer: All Live Streams | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it

"When the Okeanos Explorer is underway on an expedition, this page will broadcast Stream 1 from the ship. What is being shown on the video stream may change depending on the exploration and operations at hand; check the table below for information about the current display and/or the status updates above for information about operations."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Five Volcanoes Erupting at Once

Five Volcanoes Erupting at Once | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula may be the fieriest place on Earth.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

If El Niño Comes This Year, It Could Be a Monster

If El Niño Comes This Year, It Could Be a Monster | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it

Official NOAA Climate Prediction Center estimates peg the odds of El Niño’s return at 50 percent, but many climate scientists think that is a lowball estimate. And there are several indications that if it materializes, this year’s El Niño could be massive, a lot like the 1997-98 event that was the strongest on record.

“I think there’s no doubt that there’s an El Niño underway,” said climate scientist Kevin Trenberth of the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research. “The question is whether it’ll be a small or big one.”

.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

9 Fascinating Facts About Animals

9 Fascinating Facts About Animals | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
After reading this post, and you’ll be even more in love with animals than you already are
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Puffin chicks die of hunger

Puffin chicks die of hunger | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
For seven years now, Atlantic puffins have been abandoning chicks and eggs in their nesting colonies because they cannot find enough food. The ocean is teeming with mackerel which consume the small fish that puffins normally feed to their offspring.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Scientists name world's 100 most unusual and endangered birds

Scientists name world's 100 most unusual and endangered birds | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
'Little dodo', flightless parrot and giant ibis among species ranked by evolutionary distinctiveness and global extinction risk
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Wildlife in Gulf of Mexico still suffering four years after BP oil spill: report

Wildlife in Gulf of Mexico still suffering four years after BP oil spill: report | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Environmental campaign group finds ongoing symptoms of oil exposure in 14 species – from oysters to dolphins
more...
Christian Allié's curator insight, April 10, 1:25 PM

...........""""""""""""""""""............

 

[ ... ]

 

............. 

A study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Barataria Bay, which was heavily oiled during the spill, found dolphins were underweight and anaemic, and showing signs of liver and lung disease.

"These are top-level species that are in trouble," Inkley said. "When you see sick dolphins like we do in Barataria Bay that tells you there is a problem and it needs to be examined even further."

Sea turtles have also been stranding at a higher rate since the spill, the report said. "Roughly 500 stranded sea turtles have been found in the area affected by the spill every year from 2011 to 2013."

Last month, NOAA researchers linked the oil from BP's well to irregular heart beats in embryonic and newborn tuna. "We can now say with certainty that oil causes cardiotoxicity in fish," Stanford University fish biologist Barbara Block told a press conference at the time.

BP has discounted the studies on dolphin and tuna.

The NWF report catalogued damage to other species from the spill from oysters – which showed declines in reproduction across large areas of the northern Gulf – to sperm whales, which have exhibited higher levels of metals than whales elsewhere.

NWF scientists said it could take years before the full effects of the oil spill on marine life were understood.

Much of the research on the effects of the spill is being gathered as evidence in legal proceedings that will attempt to set a dollar figure on the amount BP has to pay to restore the Gulf.

BP released a statement dismissing NWF's findings. "The National Wildlife Federation report is a piece of political advocacy – not science. It cherry picks reports to support the organisation's agenda," BP said.

Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Milestone in Ocean Noise Fight

Milestone in Ocean Noise Fight | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Yesterday was a milestone in the fight against ocean noise pollution.  After five years, the International Maritime Organization adopted guidelines to reduce underwater noise from commercial ships. These are voluntary guidelines, not mandatory code, but their passage is a big...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Macro Photographs of Butterfly And Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill

Macro Photographs of Butterfly And Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Macro photography is a portal to a magical world that makes up everything around us and yet is unseen to the naked eye. Biochemist and photographer Linden Gladhill reveal one extraordinarily beautiful bit of this limitless world – the wings of butterflies and moths. His sensational ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

PHOTOS: 13 Epic Animal Migrations That Beat Your Lame Commute

PHOTOS: 13 Epic Animal Migrations That Beat Your Lame Commute | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Every morning, we cram ourselves into subway trains or sit in traffic. Commuting may be a part of life for many of us, but our daily journeys are nowhere near as epic or graceful as most animal migrations.

Animals migrate for a variety of reasons ...
more...
Christian Allié's curator insight, April 3, 12:10 PM

......"""""""""""""""".........

 

......

To aid them in these incredible journeys, migrants take advantage of their resources at hand -- like wind or currents -- to help them on this amazing journey, according to LiveScience. "You evolve to take advantage of abilities that already exist," Hugh Dingle, a professor emeritus at the University of California, Davis, told LiveScience in 2010. "Birds already can fly, to take the simplest case, so instead of just restricting flights to short distances, you evolve a mechanism to take flights to long distances."

But, some of these amazing natural phenomenons are at risk from climate change. Extreme weather threatens food availability and habitat, especially for ducks and other birds, and some species are at risk from extinction due to climate change, according to Yale Environment 360.

With the spring migration season underway, we're taking a look at some of the most epic animal journeys in photos. Take a look below.

Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

The origin of lions discovered

The origin of lions discovered | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it

A genetic analysis of living lions and museum specimens confirms modern lions' most recent common ancestor lived around 124,000 years ago.

Modern lions evolved into two groups; one lives in Eastern and Southern Africa, the other includes lions in Central and West Africa, and in India.

This second group is now endangered, meaning half the genetic diversity of modern lions is at risk of extinction.

Details of the findings, which may aid the conservation of lions, are published in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Sharks more evolved than thought, fossil discovery shows

Sharks more evolved than thought, fossil discovery shows | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
325m-year-old shark ancestor with tiny teeth and fish-like features challenges the predator’s ‘living fossils’ status
more...
Marian Locksley's curator insight, April 17, 11:55 AM

“The findings suggest that bony fishes may provide more clues about our first jawed ancestors than modern sharks.”

Christian Allié's curator insight, April 18, 12:02 PM

........."""""""""""""""""..........

 

[ ... ]

 

..........

Scientists have previously theorised that the structure of sharks gills had remained unchanged since the emergence of the creatures 400m years ago, long before the arrival of dinosaurs.

The discovery has implications beyond sharks, with the paper claiming it could “profoundly affect our understanding of evolutionary history”.

The support structure for gills are thought to have evolved into jaws in fish, allowing them to hunt, before developing later into land-based animals.

The paper states: “The arrangement of the visceral branchial arches, which are part of this support structure, is very similar to that of bony fishes, signifying that the most recent common ancestor of jawed vertebrates possessed some elements that were more bony fish-like than shark-like.

“This challenges the longstanding view that modern sharks have preserved an unchanged ancestral condition, and indicates that modern sharks have acquired features stemming from evolutionary innovation.

“The findings suggest that bony fishes may provide more clues about our first jawed ancestors than modern sharks.”

Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

British mammal photographer of the year 2014 - in pictures

British mammal photographer of the year 2014 - in pictures | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Hares, water voles and seals are among the winning images in the Mammal Society's annual photographer of the year competition, which aims to highlight the beauty of British mammals and the dangers they face
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mariaschnee from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

World's rarest primate faces extinction

World's rarest primate faces extinction | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Rescue bid launched to save Hainan gibbon from becoming first ape driven to extinction by humans.

 

China’s wildlife conservation efforts are under scrutiny as scientists battle to save a species found only in a tiny corner of an island in the South China Sea. The Hainan gibbon is the world’s rarest primate and its long-term survival is in jeopardy, according to an analysis.


Only 23 to 25 of the animals are thought to remain, clustered in less than 20 square kilometers of forest in China’s Hainan Island. The species (Nomascus hainanus), which numbered more than 2,000 in the late 1950s, has been devastated through the destruction of habitat from logging, and by poaching. Extinction would give the gibbon the unwelcome distinction of being the first ape to be wiped out because of human actions. To hammer out a plan to save it, international primate researchers convened an emergency summit in Hainan last month.


“With the right conservation management, it is still possible to conserve and recover the Hainan gibbon population,” says meeting co-chair Samuel Turvey, who studies animal extinctions at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL). “But given the current highly perilous state of the species, we cannot afford to wait any longer before initiating a more proactive and coordinated recovery programme.” He adds that the meeting was a successful first step towards saving the animal and that a plan of action is being finalized.

 

The plan will be based in part on a ‘population viability analysis’ that models the potential size of the gibbon population in coming decades for a range of different scenarios. It is being drawn up by Kathy Traylor Holzer, a conservation planner at the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group in Apple Valley, Minnesota. “It’s one of the smallest populations I’ve ever worked with,” says Traylor Holzer. “That number — in one place — is extremely scary.”



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Checking the Claim: A Device That Translates Dolphin Sounds Into English

Checking the Claim: A Device That Translates Dolphin Sounds Into English | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Researchers used new technology to interpret a dolphin noise they say translates loosely to
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Parasitic Flatworm Could Decimate Coral Reefs Worldwide

Parasitic Flatworm Could Decimate Coral Reefs Worldwide | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
A coral-eating flatworm with a unique camouflaging strategy could be a major threat to the world's coral reefs
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Greenland sharks have high levels of toxic pollutants

Greenland sharks have high levels of toxic pollutants | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
It is well known that polar bears accumulate alarmingly high concentrations of PCBs and other pollutants. It is now discovered that also Greenland sharks have contaminants in their bodies. The long-term effects remain unknown.
more...
Marian Locksley's curator insight, April 13, 12:28 PM

“We had this theory that the sharks would occasionally move south, but it turns out that they stay in the waters around Svalbard,” says Professor Bjørn Munro Jenssen, at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU). He specializes in pollutants and arctic biology.

 

These finds are very provocative. The species highest up on the food chain are the most affected. We are among them,” Jenssen says.

Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Orchids 101: One big happy family

Orchids 101: One big happy family | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
With more than 20,000 species (around four times as many species as mammals!) and more than 800 genera, orchids are an incredibly diverse and complex family of plants. For example, did you know that one orchid seedpod can contain as many as 3 million seeds? Or that some orchids can live for 100 years? Undoubtedly you've seen these potted flowers, like the popular Phalaenopsis orchids shown here, but there's much more to know about these botanical beauties. (Text: Anna Norris)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Wildlife cameraman Doug Allan: I like to get on an animal's wavelength

Wildlife cameraman Doug Allan: I like to get on an animal's wavelength | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it

Not many people go to Kong Karls Land, and even fewer return from these Arctic islands way north of Norway because it is a world of polar bears and is strictly off limits to all but the most intrepid or foolhardy. So when photographer Doug Allan got permission to film sequences there for David Attenborough's Planet Earth series, he did not expect an easy assignment – it is usually -32C in April, the wind is vicious and hauling cameras in the deep snow is a nightmare.

After walking five or more hours a day and watching polar bear dens in the snow slopes for 23 days, however, Allan had seen just one mother bear and her cub. By day 24, he says, he was living "in bear world, at bear speed, with bear senses".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Lion killing in Tanzania reduced by installation of 'living wall' fences

Lion killing in Tanzania reduced by installation of 'living wall' fences | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Conflict between endangered predators and cattle-owning Masai significantly helped by project using African myrrh trees
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

New origin seen for Earth's tectonic plates

New origin seen for Earth's tectonic plates | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Continual diving of crust into mantle is sufficient to explain formation of plate boundaries.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Hummingbird family tree unveiled

Hummingbird family tree unveiled | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
For such small creatures, hummingbirds certainly have racked up an outsized list of unique claims to fame.

They are the smallest birds and the smallest warm-blooded animals on Earth. They have the fastest heart and the fastest metabolism of any vertebrate. They are the only birds that can fly backward. And according to a new report they also have a complicated evolutionary history.

Researchers constructed the family tree of these nectar-eating birds using genetic information from most of the world's 338 hummingbird species and their closest relatives. They say hummingbirds can be divided into nine groups, with differences in size, habitat, feeding strategy and body shape.

The common ancestor to all species in existence today lived about 22 million years ago in South America, several million years after hummingbirds were known to be flourishing in Europe, they write. Today's hummingbirds are found only in the Americas.

more...
Christian Allié's curator insight, April 4, 11:25 AM

...."""""""""""""""""......

 

[ ... ]

 

...... 

The discovery of fossils in Germany of the oldest known hummingbirds — 30 million years old — was announced in 2004.

"The fossil record for hummingbirds, and other small birds, is so poor that we really don't know when European hummingbirds disappeared. It could have been 30 million years ago, or it could have been a few thousand years ago," says Witt.

The hummingbird evolutionary lineage split from a related group of small birds called swifts and treeswifts about 42 million years ago — most likely in Europe or Asia — and by 22 million years ago the ancestral species of modern hummingbirds was in South America, the researchers write.

Hummingbirds found their way to South America probably after crossing a land bridge that once connected Siberia to Alaska. Once in South America, they expanded into new ecological niches and evolved new species, then spread back to North America about 12 million years ago and into the Caribbean about five million years ago.

The biggest threat to hummingbirds is loss of habitat thanks to human activities. If people were not around, they "would just continue on their merry way evolving new species," says McGuire.

The smallest species today, and the smallest bird in existence, is the bee hummingbird of Cuba, which measures about 5 centimetres long and weighs between 1.6 to 1.9 grams. The largest is the giant hummingbird of South America, which measures about 20 centimetres and weighs about 20 grams.

Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Ancient Monastery at Petra Likely Built to Track Sun

Ancient Monastery at Petra Likely Built to Track Sun | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Add the Monastery at Petra to the monuments that humans likely built for astronomical purposes. New research suggests that ancient architects tracked the motion of the sun and constructed the religious center with the winter solstice in mind.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mariaschnee
Scoop.it!

Tongue of the Ocean

Tongue of the Ocean | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
During the last Ice Age, when sea levels were lower and the Bahama shelf was exposed land. Rainwater drained down the cliffs, carving gullies in soft rocks. Modern sea levels submerge the region, with pale blue water on the shallow shelf, darkening to deep blue in the submarine canyon.
more...
No comment yet.