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Underwater World Captured in Stunning Photos: Slide Show : DNews

Underwater World Captured in Stunning Photos: Slide Show : DNews | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
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Gaia Diary
“The more we nurture the planet, the better and more natural a life we'll have.” ― Chris d'Lacey, Icefire
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Carl Sagan - Pale Blue Dot

It is sometimes said that scientists are unromantic, that their passion to figure out robs the world of beauty and mystery. But is it not stirring to understand how the world actually works — that white light is made of colors, that color is the way we perceive the wavelengths of light, that transparent air reflects light, that in so doing it discriminates among the waves, and that the sky is blue for the same reason that the sunset is red? It does no harm to the romance of the sunset to know a little bit about it
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Testing the fossil record

Testing the fossil record | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Does the fossil record paint an accurate picture of the history of life? Norwegian geobiologist believes that fossils can tell us a lot about the evolution of life, but also about the evolution of Earth itself.
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26 Gorgeous Cats That Are Disappearing From the Wild

26 Gorgeous Cats That Are Disappearing From the Wild | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Many wild cats, including big cats and small wild cats, are currently listed as “critically endangered,” “endangered,” or “near threatened.”:
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This is probably how fish evolved to walk on land - Futurity

This is probably how fish evolved to walk on land - Futurity | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Scientists have raised fish out of water to study how their ancestors once evolved to walk on land.

Via Christian Allié
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Christian Allié's curator insight, September 3, 3:42 AM

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On their fins

As reported in Nature, the fish showed significant anatomical and behavioral changes. The terrestrialized fish walked more effectively by placing their fins closer to their bodies, lifted their heads higher, and kept their fins from slipping as much as fish that were raised in water.

 

“Anatomically, their pectoral skeleton changed to become more elongate with stronger attachments across their chest, possibly to increase support during walking, and a reduced contact with the skull to potentially allow greater head/neck motion,” says Trina Du, a McGill PhD student and study collaborator.

“Because many of the anatomical changes mirror the fossil record, we can hypothesize that the behavioral changes we see also reflect what may have occurred when fossil fish first walked with their fins on land,” says Hans Larsson, Canada Research Chair in Macroevolution at McGill.

 

The terrestrialized Polypterus experiment is unique and provides new ideas for how fossil fishes may have used their fins in a terrestrial environment and what evolutionary processes were at play.

Larsson adds, “This is the first example we know of that demonstrates developmental plasticity may have facilitated a large-scale evolutionary transition, by first accessing new anatomies and behaviors that could later be genetically fixed by natural selection”.

The Canada Research Chairs Program, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), and Tomlinson Postdoctoral fellowship supported the work.


Source: McGill University

Christian Allié's comment, September 3, 9:00 AM
Thanks, have a nice day !
Mariaschnee's comment, September 3, 10:02 AM
You're welcome! Have a nice day too!
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Seven continents: Snapshots of troubled species - Environmental Health News

Seven continents: Snapshots of troubled species - Environmental Health News | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Environmental Health News
Seven continents: Snapshots of troubled species
Environmental Health News
Research stations have released flame retardants and other pollutants into the pristine environment, contaminating Adelie penguins.
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Antarctic sea-level surge linked to icesheet loss

Antarctic sea-level surge linked to icesheet loss | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Sea levels around Antarctica have been rising a third faster than the global average, a clear sign of high melt water runoff from the continent's icesheet, say scientists.
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Pictures: Volcanoes Erupting Around the World This Week

Pictures: Volcanoes Erupting Around the World This Week | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Photographers captured volcanoes rumbling to life around the world, from Papua New Guinea to Ecuador.
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NOAA lists 20 coral species as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

NOAA lists 20 coral species as threatened under the Endangered Species Act | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
NOAA lists 20 coral species as threatened under the Endangered Species Act
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See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru

See-Through Frogs With Green Bones Discovered in Peru | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Researchers discover four new species of frog in the Peruvian Andes, three of which are see-through.
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Christian Allié's curator insight, September 2, 11:07 AM

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The fourth newly described species, Hyalinobatrachium anachoretus, was recorded in cloud forest at an altitude of 6,725 feet (2,050 meters). Other known species in this genus are found up to a maximum elevation of 3,280 feet (1,000 meters), so the find was “very unexpected,” Castroviejo-Fisher said.

The team discovered this frog in large numbers, but only on one particular night. Other nighttime surveys of the same area failed to turn up a single specimen.

 

The bigger mystery scientists are struggling to solve is why these and other glass frogs allow us to see straight though them. “Without a doubt, the adaptive, developmental, and genomic basis for the transparency of glass frogs is a long-standing question in zoology,” Castroviejo-Fisher said.

 

In the meantime, the backlog of undescribed glass frogs in South America is mounting. “We have a bunch of new species awaiting description in our offices,” Castroviejo-Fisher said.

 

The see-through frogs clearly have a lot more to reveal.

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How the Jaguar Saved My Life [Excerpt]

How the Jaguar Saved My Life [Excerpt] | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
A love of the jaguar helped inspire one of the world's leading proponents for saving big cats
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How lizards regenerate their tails: Researchers discover genetic 'recipe'

How lizards regenerate their tails: Researchers discover genetic 'recipe' | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
By understanding the secret of how lizards regenerate their tails, researchers may be able to develop ways to stimulate the regeneration of limbs in humans. Now, a team of researchers is one step closer to solving that mystery. The scientists have discovered the genetic “recipe” for lizard tail regeneration, which may come down to using genetic ingredients in just the right mixture and amounts.
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Global warming slowdown answer lies in depths of Atlantic, study finds

Global warming slowdown answer lies in depths of Atlantic, study finds | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Excess heat being stored hundreds of metres down in Atlantic and Southern oceans – not Pacific as previously thought
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Ecosystem found under Antarctic ice sheet raises hopes for alien life

Ecosystem found under Antarctic ice sheet raises hopes for alien life | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Tiny rock-eating lifeforms have been discovered living half a mile beneath pack ice in Antarctica, raising the prospect that life could exist in similarly hostile environments such as Mars
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Clever Trout Match Chimps in a Cognitive Challenge

Clever Trout Match Chimps in a Cognitive Challenge | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Certain forms of collaboration are supposed to be so sophisticated that only the smartest creatures---namely humans and perhaps a few close relatives---are capable of them. Yet this exclusive club has a new and unexpected member: a species of fish, a class of animals seldom associated with high-level intelligence.
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Deep sea 'mushroom' may be new branch of life

Deep sea 'mushroom' may be new branch of life | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it

A team of scientists at the University of Copenhagen says the tiny organism does not fit into any of the known subdivisions of the animal kingdom.

Such a situation has occurred only a handful of times in the last 100 years.

 

The organisms, which were originally collected in 1986, are described in the academic journal Plos One.

The authors of the article note several similarities with the bizarre and enigmatic soft-bodied life forms that lived between 635 and 540 million years ago - the span of Earth history known as the Ediacaran Period.


These organisms, too, have proven difficult to categorise and some researchers have even suggested they were failed experiments in multi-cellular life.

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MeteoEarth.com - 3D Wetter zum Anfassen!

MeteoEarth.com - 3D Wetter zum Anfassen! | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
MeteoEarth is no ordinary weather app – it is far more! MeteoEarth offers global comprehensive weather forecasts as high resolution animation films in an innovative format!
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Clams, Mussels Clean up Ocean Pollutants - Nature World News

Clams, Mussels Clean up Ocean Pollutants - Nature World News | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Nature World News Clams, Mussels Clean up Ocean Pollutants Nature World News "We are considering using a raft carrying caged native bivalves, which will allow us to monitor the health of the bivalves and also protect them from predators," study...
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Ocean map points to garbage patch polluters

Ocean map points to garbage patch polluters | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
A new atlas of the world's oceans points the finger at countries responsible for giant floating patches of garbage, say researchers.
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A World Apart - Photo Gallery

A World Apart - Photo Gallery | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Now the southern Line Islands will be protected.
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This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years

This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
The USGS says sea-level rise and sinking could claim up to 4,677 square miles of land along the coast if the state doesn’t implement major restoration plans.
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Iceland's Seabird Colonies Are Vanishing, With "Massive" Chick Deaths

Iceland's Seabird Colonies Are Vanishing, With "Massive" Chick Deaths | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Global warming and ocean pollutants are to blame for huge losses of puffins, kittiwakes, and terns.
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The 1,300 Bird Species Facing Extinction Signal Threats to Human Health

The 1,300 Bird Species Facing Extinction Signal Threats to Human Health | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Birds, the most watched nonhuman creatures on the planet, tip us off to threats to human health.
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New species of endemic treefrog from Madagascar

New species of endemic treefrog from Madagascar | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
A new species of the Boophis rappiodes group is described from Madagascar. This green with bright red speckling treefrog is so far only known from the hidden streams of Ankarafa Forest in northwestern part of the island. The new species presents a high genetic divergence and different call but it is highly threatened by the continuing decline in the quality and extent of its habitat.
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Dead Clams Talking: Reading Past Climate in Clam Shells

Dead Clams Talking: Reading Past Climate in Clam Shells | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
An excursion into northern Norway aims to collect and analyze common clams – to crack the mysteries of climate change, past and present.History Written in Rings

The living Arctica islandica Wanamaker and colleagues had identified was over 500 years old. Going one step farther, the team was able to use isotopic analysis to track the tug-of-war between Arctic and North Atlantic currents on an annual basis, just by examining the chemicals in the layers of the clam’s shell. Like tree dating (dendrochronology), the science of sclerochronology matches rings – in this case shell rings – among individuals to establish accurate ages. And like dendrochronology, sclerochronology is accurate to the single year, not decades or centuries like ice cores and geologic strata.

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Wild Nile: wildlife on the river Nile - in pictures

Wild Nile: wildlife on the river Nile - in pictures | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Wildlife on the river Nile, from Uganda to Egypt, with photographs from Wild Nile on Nat Geo WILD
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Neanderthals and humans were neighbours in Europe

Neanderthals and humans were neighbours in Europe | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Far from wiping out Neanderthals overnight, modern humans lived alongside their shorter and stockier cousins in Europe for thousands of years, confirms a new study.
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