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Tigers under threat from rapidly disappearing mangrove forest - Climate Change - Everything is Interconnected

Tigers under threat from rapidly disappearing mangrove forest - Climate Change - Everything is Interconnected | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it

JN 29, 2013 GUARDIAN ENVIRONMENT

Report shows vast forest, shared by India and Bangladesh, is being rapidly destroyed by environmental change.

A vast mangrove forest shared by India and Bangladesh that is home to possibly 500 Bengal tigers is being rapidly destroyed by erosion, rising sea levels and storm surges, according to a major study by researchers at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) and others.... http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/jan/29/sunderbans-disappearing-mangrove-india-bangladesh


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Gaia Diary
“The more we nurture the planet, the better and more natural a life we'll have.” ― Chris d'Lacey, Icefire
Curated by Mariaschnee
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Carl Sagan - Pale Blue Dot

It is sometimes said that scientists are unromantic, that their passion to figure out robs the world of beauty and mystery. But is it not stirring to understand how the world actually works — that white light is made of colors, that color is the way we perceive the wavelengths of light, that transparent air reflects light, that in so doing it discriminates among the waves, and that the sky is blue for the same reason that the sunset is red? It does no harm to the romance of the sunset to know a little bit about it
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Massive Supercell Thunderstorms, Mammatus Clouds and More by Mike Mezeul II

Massive Supercell Thunderstorms, Mammatus Clouds and More by Mike Mezeul II | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it

"Mike Mezeul II is a Texas-based photographer who's used to shooting everything from professional sporting events to music concerts. It's when he positions his camera up to the sky, however, that the real magic happens. The photographer isn't afraid to chase huge thunderstorms or surreal-looking mammatus clouds. Over the last fifteen years, he's traversed thousands of miles to get the perfect shot.
To him, the parts of the storm that are visually intriguing are the clouds.
 "

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14 Unique Places That Transform When Night Falls

14 Unique Places That Transform When Night Falls | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it

 

Forest Park, New YorkWaitomo Cave, New ZealandEastern Coast, AustraliaBlue Grotto, Capri, ItalyAtlantic Rainforest, Sao PauloForests of Tennessee in SpringAurora, CanadaToyama Bay, JapanForests in Subtropical AsiaKilauea, HawaiiDeep Ocean, WorldwideSalar De Uyuni, BoliviaCatatumbo, VenezuelaVaadhoo, Maldives

 

 

 

 

 


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Comparing the Environmental Impacts of the Chernobyl and Fukushima Disasters

Comparing the Environmental Impacts of the Chernobyl and Fukushima Disasters | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
According to Steinhauser and colleagues the environmental consequences of Chernobyl exceed the Fukushima accident by almost any measure. While 4 reactor complexes were involved at Fukushima and only one at Chernobyl, the total releases of radionuclides appear to be an order of magnitude lower for Fukushima.
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Environmental bleaching impairs long-term coral reproduction

Environmental bleaching impairs long-term coral reproduction | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Bleaching -- a process where high water temperatures or UV light stresses the coral to the point where it loses its symbiotic algal partner that provides the coral with color -- is also affecting the long-term fertility of the coral.

Via Gaye Rosier
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How many water-bearing comets visited Earth?

How many water-bearing comets visited Earth? | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific conceptsHow many comets had to visit Earth, over how long a period, to provide all the water in our rivers and oceans?
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The 9 rarest plants in the world

The 9 rarest plants in the world | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
These strange and amazing plants live in remote corners of the planet, and are all critically endangered

Via Christian Allié
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"Skeleton Flowers" Turn Beautifully Transparent in the Rain

"Skeleton Flowers" Turn Beautifully Transparent in the Rain | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
The Diphylleia grayi is an extraordinary flower with white petals that turn beautifully transparent upon contact with water. During light rain showers, the delicate blooms transform into blossoms as clear as glass, fitting its common moniker "skeleton flower."
The plant can be found growing on moist, wooded mountainsides in the colder regions of Japan and China come late spring. The Diphylleia grayi is recognizable by its large, distinctly umbrella-like leaves topped with small clusters of pearl
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40 Years of Scratching Reveals Ocean Acidification Data | Climate Central

40 Years of Scratching Reveals Ocean Acidification Data | Climate Central | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
“Without the foundation measurements, we can’t talk about changes,” Takahashi said. He likened it to the Keeling Curve, which has charted the rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide since 1957.

But while the baseline might be a jackpot for scientific research, it also shows that the changes taking place in the high seas could exact a heavy toll. Human emissions of carbon dioxide are far and away the biggest driver of ocean acidification. Oceans take up roughly a quarter of the carbon dioxide produced by human activities. That might reduce the amount of heat building in the atmosphere, but it’s hardly good news as a series of chemistry processes turns it into acid that can destroy corals, dissolve shells and disrupt marine food webs. Those impacts can, in turn, find their way on shore from lost revenue and jobs to decreased coastal protection from storm surges and high tides.
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Christian Allié's curator insight, November 19, 10:46 AM

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The current rate of acidification for the ocean is one unseen in the past 300 million years, but the data reveal important regional and seasonal differences between ocean basins. Ocean acidification hot spots dot the globe at different times of year, particularly the northwest Indian Ocean and areas around the tip of South America in the summer, and the Bering Sea in the winter.

 

Having an accurate look at current seasonality and future expected rates of change provides a stark warning about what the future could look like. According to the study, areas around Bermuda will likely see oceans acidify to levels currently beyond the current seasonal swings in the next 40-50 years, meaning plants and animals will have to adapt to an entirely new environment.

Around Hawaii and the eastern Atlantic, that transition will happen even sooner, likely in the next 20-30 years. What that means for the species that inhabit those regions is of utmost important to scientists and natural resource managers.

 

While some of these regional differences in acidity and its impacts are fairly well known, others, such as the Indian Ocean hot spot, are still mysteries waiting to be unraveled.

“Anytime you pull on one thing, two other things are moving at the same time so you get this complex set of relationships,” Dwight Gledhill, the deputy director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Ocean Acidification Program, said.

Gledhill, who wasn’t involved with the study, said the research provides a good foundation to understanding differences in ocean chemistry in different parts of the world, and helps in monitoring reef health. But he was wary of calling it a baseline.

 

“I tend to steer clear of baseline terms. We missed the baseline about 200 years ago. We’re very much on a moving target here. But that said, you need some reference point to use. It’s an amazing synthesis of data.”

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Hurricanes Since 1851

Hurricanes Since 1851 | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
1) Structure.
Hurricanes clearly abhor the equator and fling themselves away from the warm waters of their birth as quickly as they can. Paging Dr. Freud.
The void circling the image is the equator. Hurricanes can never ever cross it. Check out the oddball to hit South America, though.

2) Detection.
Detection has skyrocketed since satellite technology but mostly since we started logging storms in the eastern hemisphere. Also the proportionality of storm severity looks to be getting more consistent year to year with the benefit of more data.

Anyways have at it, and you can find a superultramega-sized version here or check out poster print options here. And check out the slightly animated version of hurricane seasons since 1978 here.

Projection
The best part about this process was finding a map projection that would be both cool looking and show the circuitous structure of the data. I still prefer the South Pole Stereographic but here are some of the also-rans. Maybe you'll find one of them more orienting...
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Mapping the World's (Few) Protected Seas

Mapping the World's (Few) Protected Seas | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Gabon and the U.S. have new marine reserves, but just a fraction of the seas are protected.
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Spineless: extraordinary portraits of marine invertebrates - in pictures

Spineless: extraordinary portraits of marine invertebrates - in pictures | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Crabs, starfish, jellyfish if they dont have a backbone, theyve probably been shot by wildlife photographer Susan Middleton.
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Amazing Phenomenon Of Singing Plants

Amazing Phenomenon Of Singing Plants | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Plants are very much alive. Not only do they dislike human noise but they also posses the capacity to learn and communicate.
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Christian Allié's curator insight, November 14, 10:52 AM

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*********** Vidéos ************

 

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The plants have the most sensitive variations when they signal the arrival of the person who cares for them, when being watered, when spoken to, during the creation of music, etc.
Sensations felt within the plant induce a physiological reaction, which then expresses itself in electrical, conductive and resistance variations. These variations can be translated in different ways, including into musical scales.

The experiments have shown that plants definitely appear to enjoy learning to use musical scales and also making their own music with the use of a synthesizer.

Although there is currently little scientific research conducted on this subject, one cannot deny that listen to these beautiful plants is a joy for the soul.

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17 Shocking Photos That Show How Global Warming Is Everywhere

17 Shocking Photos That Show How Global Warming Is Everywhere | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Climate change is here and it's changing the world around us.
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Avoiding ecosystem collapse: Experts Weigh in

Avoiding ecosystem collapse: Experts Weigh in | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
From coral reefs to prairie grasslands, some of the world's most iconic habitats are susceptible to sudden collapse due to seemingly minor events. A classic example: the decimation of kelp forests when a decline of otter predation unleashes urchin population explosions. Three studies hold the promise of helping resource managers predict, avoid, and reverse the tipping points that lead to degraded habitats, economic losses, and social upheaval.
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These Incredible Tiny Islands Suck Pollution Out of Water

These Incredible Tiny Islands Suck Pollution Out of Water | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
A Scottish company is building floating ecosystems to clean up rivers and lakes.
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Christian Allié's curator insight, November 26, 10:36 AM

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*****  Vidéo *****

 

...............  The islands look and work like wetlands. Man-made structures hold together their vegetation; the pollutant-sucking process works naturally. Roots suspended beneath the islands promote the growth of aquatic biofilm (the green slime you find on rocks) that “cleanse[s] the water through the breakdown, sorption, and metabolic transformation of nutrients and impurities,” explains the Biomatrix website.

 

Treatment plants have used biofilm filters for decades, reports Fast Company. But the company’s engineering additions, such as columns of synthetic fiber, maximize the growth of the beneficial bacteria that absorbs pollutants.

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Saving Planet Earth : Documentary on the Science behind Saving the Earth's Environment - YouTube

Saving Planet Earth : Documentary on the Science behind Saving the Earth's Environment. 2014 The documentary you will see here along with the other documenta...

Via Paulo Gervasio
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Why do puffer fish build sandcastles?

Why do puffer fish build sandcastles? | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Puffer fish build delicate and intricate structures on the ocean floor, but what could they possibly be used for?

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Belief in 'Oneness' Equated With Pro-Environment Behavior

Belief in 'Oneness' Equated With Pro-Environment Behavior | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
New research finds a link between concern for the environment and belief in the concept of universal interconnectedness.

Via Paulo Gervasio
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Calcium loss turning lakes to ‘jelly’

Calcium loss turning lakes to ‘jelly’ | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Declining calcium levels in some North American lakes are causing major depletions of dominant plankton species, enabling the rapid rise of their ecological competitor: a small jelly-clad invertebrate. Scientists say increasing ‘jellification’ will damage fish stocks and filtration systems that allow lakes to supply drinking water, and that lakes may have been pushed into “an entirely new ecological state”.
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Striking Pictures From International Space Station Reveal Gorgeous Earth

Striking Pictures From International Space Station Reveal Gorgeous Earth | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
These images from the International Space Station shed light on our dynamic planet.
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Fountain of Youth Underlies Antarctic Mountains | Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Fountain of Youth Underlies Antarctic Mountains | Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
In a new study, scientists explain why the ice-covered Gamburtsev Mountains in the middle of Antarctica looks as young as they do.

The Gamburtsevs were discovered in the 1950s, but remained unexplored until scientists flew ice-penetrating instruments over the mountains 60 years later. As this ancient hidden landscape came into focus, scientists were stunned to see the saw-toothed and towering crags of much younger mountains. Though the Gamburtsevs are contemporaries of the largely worn-down Appalachians, they looked more like the Rockies, which are nearly 200 million years younger.
More surprising still, the scientists discovered a vast network of lakes and rivers at the mountains’ base. Though water usually speeds erosion, here it seems to have kept erosion at bay. The reason, researchers now say, has to do with the thick ice that has entombed the Gamburtsevs since Antarctica went into a deep freeze 35 million years ago.

“The ice sheet acts like an anti-aging cream,” said the study’s lead author, Timothy Creyts, a geophysicist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. “It triggers a series of thermodynamic processes that have almost perfectly preserved the Gamburtsevs since ice began spreading across the continent.”
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20 Stunning Autumn Photos That Celebrate the Color Changing Season

20 Stunning Autumn Photos That Celebrate the Color Changing Season | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
It's fall! Time to see the leaves change colors. Who wants to jump in a pile of crinkly leaves and hear them crunch? Better yet, why not check out these glorious photos that will make you want to celebrate the season. Today we've compiled 20 autumn images that remind you of what a colorful time it is right now. Make sure to step outside your door and breathe in the crisp, cool air. It won't be long before it's too cold to go outside!

Above photo: Edwin Kats

Photo: Danny Dungo
Photo: Evgeni D
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Meet the Tiny Killer Causing Millions of Sea Stars to Waste Away

Meet the Tiny Killer Causing Millions of Sea Stars to Waste Away | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
The deadly sea star wasting disease, which turns live animals into slimy goop, is caused by a previously unknown virus
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10 Breathtakingly Weird-Looking Insects

10 Breathtakingly Weird-Looking Insects | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
This mantis resembles a new-bloomed orchid, which presumably lulls its victims into a false sense of curiosity as they admire its color scheme before it beheads them. Imagine a wolf covered in daisies and you're not far off.
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Wild cats were tamed with strokes and treats, genetic analysis suggests

Wild cats were tamed with strokes and treats, genetic analysis suggests | Gaia Diary | Scoop.it
Key differences between wild and domesticated cats include changes in genes associated with reward and pleasure
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