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Unit 7: Comparing Urban Footprints

Unit 7: Comparing Urban Footprints | Geography | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon, Pranav Pradeep
Blake Welborn's insight:

This a conglomeration of maps that represent the physical layout and land use of some of the major cities in the world, color coded by region. 

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:41 AM

useful for both Year 8 and Year 11 Geography.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 12:49 PM

The comparison of urban footprints certainly puts a lot of factors into perspective.  Whenever I am in highly populated areas such as Atlanta and New York, I feel like the area is so densely populated. But shift over to Sao Paulo which is so much smaller than New York, but just as populated.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

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Unit 7: Blueprint Denver - Denver Community Planning and Development

Unit 7: Blueprint Denver - Denver Community Planning and Development | Geography | Scoop.it
Blueprint Denver - Denver Community Planning and Development
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As Denver grows and expands as a metropolis, the current infrastructure must be modified, and new infrastructure must be carefully planned. Denver is a very pedestrian friendly and green city, and new development must comply with these demands per city council and local laws.

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Unit 5: Land-Use Planning - An Overview of Land-Use Planning

Unit 5: Land-Use Planning - An Overview of Land-Use Planning | Geography | Scoop.it
Learn about land-use planning from this overview of the topic from the About.com Geography site.
Blake Welborn's insight:

This article outlines the basic principles or urban and rural land use. It describes needs for basic transportation, infrastructure, and water retention/distribution. This is a good introduction to the study of land use. 

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Unit 5: Centennial, Arapahoe County at odds over marijuana rules

Unit 5: Centennial, Arapahoe County at odds over marijuana rules | Geography | Scoop.it
CENTENNIAL — Arapahoe County and Centennial are at odds over rules governing people who grow marijuana for personal use.
Blake Welborn's insight:

this article is about the push from mostly urban marijuana growing to move it out to more agricultural areas outside of cities in Arapaho county. This would compete with more publicly used crops that are grown in these areas, increasing competition. 

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Unit 4: Political Geography of the Oceans - Who Owns the Oceans?

Unit 4: Political Geography of the Oceans - Who Owns the Oceans? | Geography | Scoop.it
The control and ownership of the oceans has long been a controversial topic. Since ancient empires began to sail and trade over the seas, command of coastal areas has been important to governments. However, it wasn't until the twentieth century that countries began to come together to discuss a standardization of maritime boundaries. Learn more about who owns the oceans.
Blake Welborn's insight:

An often argued about and violent principle is who owns the oceans. Though rules are set, they are often violated and ruled against. This ownership and use of the ocean has a tole on political geography and the relations of countries. 

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Unit 1: Test your geography knowledge - clickable map quizzes

Unit 1: Test your geography knowledge - clickable map quizzes | Geography | Scoop.it
clickable map quizzes of the world
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Here is a geographic quiz of the countries of Europe that is paired with an informative video and explanation of each countries and its geographic perspectives. 

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Unit 5: Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont

Unit 5: Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont | Geography | Scoop.it
Lawmakers in Vermont are looking to regulate food labels so customers can know which products are made from genetically modified crops, but agricultural giants Monsanto say they will sue if the state follows through.

Via Seth Dixon
Blake Welborn's insight:

If monsanto can win a course a battle saying they don't have to represent their GMO's on products, then they will be able to win in other places which will further murk up the waters of GMO presentation.

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Michelle Gentry's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:35 PM

ugh

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, October 24, 2013 1:24 PM



Vermont has a strong agricultural history and allot of their local economy is based off of their agricultural movement, which has been trending towards sustainable and organic growing methods. The people of Vermont care very much where their food comes from and what is in their food, hence the push for GMO labeling. I think other states would absolutely follow suit if Vermont wins it's case against the agri-business giant monsanto, but that's a big IF. I think that if there were labeling all across the US either these companies would drastically change their business models or ship them overseas to developing nations that have food security issues of their own,  

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 6:40 PM

I don’t think that there is a specific reason on why  Vermont is the first state to make some headway in producing this type of legislation, Vermont used to pride themselves on being one of the states with a large numbers of organic farms. And with a company like Monsanto whom use GMO on their product, it doesn’t go well with Vermont image. I do think that other states will follow suit because using Genetically Modified Organisms(GMO) and Genetically Engineered (GE) affect our help and Vermont cannot fight this big corporation by themselves. I feel that even though requiring labels on products that contain GMO is a good thing for us the consumers to know Exactly  what we are giving to ur family. I do think that is going to be a bad impact. because this big corporations like Monsanto is a good source of employment for the states. If they feel that the can make their product, they are going to take their business else where.

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Unit 6: Stock in marijuana companies skyrocket after Colorado sells $1 mil on first day

Unit 6: Stock in marijuana companies skyrocket after Colorado sells $1 mil on first day | Geography | Scoop.it
The long lines stretching around Colorado marijuana shops have apparently not gone unnoticed by investors, with the price of shares for cannabis-related companies skyrocketing since the drug became legal throughout the state on January 1.

Via Professor Al Anon
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As marijuana is legalized and becomes more popular and used by professionals, stocks will begin to skyrocket, forming a whole new sector of the market available in Colorado. 

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Unit 3: Austin Restaurants | Listings, Maps & Contact Info

Unit 3: Austin Restaurants | Listings, Maps & Contact Info | Geography | Scoop.it
The reputation for food in Austin just keeps getting better. View a complete list - including contact information - for all Austin restaurants.
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This is a database of restaurants suggested to tourists as apart of Austin's local culture. I do not agree with most of these eateries because, in short, they suck. 

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Unit 2: International Migration

Almost everywhere on the world, international migration is a hot topic. Most of the time the debate about migration is fierce and charged with prejudices and...

Via Natalie K Jensen, Nancy Watson, Seth Dixon
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A video giving a detailed description of international migration and its causes, and effects. The video also touches on the laws and common themes of associated with migration. 

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Sierra_Mcswagger's curator insight, September 10, 10:02 AM

This video is primarily talking on the widely known topic of migration. 3 percent of the worlds population is living away from there place of birth. The push of migration from places include poverty, war, and environmental disasters. The migration pull in some places are because of  economic opportunity, and political freedom. Migration is increasing, and is thought of as a bad thing.(s.s.)

Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 7, 8:59 PM

This video is great for going over the many different aspects that go along with migration. It talks about what migration is and the reasons why people migrate known as push and pull factors. It talks about the different types of migration such as asylum seakers and illegal immigration. It mentions the disadvantages and advantages of migration.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:27 PM

A great YouTube video- discussing the controversy of international migration among other things that fall into place of the disapproval of international migration. -UNIT 2 

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Unit 2: Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Unit 2: Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | Geography | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”

 

As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 

 

Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


Via Seth Dixon
Blake Welborn's insight:

A map that details the countries with the highest count of refugees. This map shows the patterns of immigrants and possible areas that would be prone to conflict and refugees. 

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jada_chace's curator insight, September 10, 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 12:31 PM

Refugees are often thought of as those with the "refugee problems" they face, the problems they create and the constant struggle they possess of never being able to go home for the political/religious dispute in their homeland.  

However this articles goes into depth of the definition of a refugee and furthermore focuses on the topic of "environmental refugees' who are forced to get up and leave their land due to soul degradation, flooding, etc. - UNIT 2

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Unit 2: Modern Faces and Ancient Migrations

Unit 2: Modern Faces and Ancient Migrations | Geography | Scoop.it
Our friends at Abroad in the Yard wrote an interesting article back in December 2011 about Modern Faces and Ancient Migrations. As you’re probably aware, the migration of people, their ethnicity an...

Via Community Village Sites
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Great article about ancient migrations and the people who migrated, which details what was one of the first migrations and the areas that it occurred in, and who was doing the migrating. 

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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:51 PM

This map shows where the Native Americans have migrated in the United States over along period of time. The interesting aspect about this map is that they did not migrate in one particular place. They migrated all over the south, east, west and north of the country.

ryan davis's curator insight, September 10, 9:37 AM

there are many debates about where people migrated to or from. a big debate on the subject is the native americans deriving from china and migrating here. my opinion on that is that the native americans probably derived from another country but not asia. this is what i believe because they do not look like the typical asain people that you see today

bobby isham's curator insight, September 10, 9:57 AM

There is a lot of debates about migrants all over the world. There are questions of where these people came from and why they went where they did. One big debate is whether the Native Americans came from Asia to North America and whether there was one or more waves of them.

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Unit 2: CO: Boulder County floods: Whats in the water? | BoulderWeekly.com

Unit 2: CO: Boulder County floods: Whats in the water? | BoulderWeekly.com | Geography | Scoop.it

The first dangers posed by the recent flooding were obvious: loss of life and property due to swift-moving water.

 

But now that the waters are slowing and the levels are in decline, it’s time to begin the difficult task of assessing the potential damage that the flooding has caused — and may yet cause — to human health and the environment, and what we can do to protect ourselves.

 

First and foremost, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and health departments at the local and state level are strongly encouraging people to stay out of floodwater if at all possible. If contact is unavoidable, wearing the proper protective clothing is encouraged, and there is good reason for such precaution.

 

According to the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), “Floodwater often contains infectious organisms, including intestinal bacteria such as E. coli, Salmonella and Shigella; Hepatitis A Virus; and agents of typhoid, paratyphoid and tetanus.”

 

If persons in flood-affected areas experience symptoms such as fever, nausea, muscle aches, vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea, they should seek immediate medical attention.

 

Most flood-related illnesses are the result of ingesting water or food that has been contaminated with bacteria, viruses or microbes. This most often occurs because hands that have touched contaminated water or soil are not properly washed before eating. Tetanus, which may be the most serious of the flood-related illnesses, is the exception. Tetanus most often enters the body through an open wound or scratch that has been exposed to flood waters, mud or soil. The symptoms of tetanus, in order of occurrence, according to the Mayo clinic website, are, “Spasms and stiffness in your jaw muscles, stiffness of your neck muscles, difficulty swallowing, stiffness of your abdominal muscles, painful body spasms lasting for several min utes, typically triggered by minor occurrences, such as a draft, loud noise, physical touch or light. Other signs and symptoms may include: fever, sweating, elevated blood pressure and rapid heart rate.”

 

These are the usual, naturally occurring contaminants found in floodwaters and soils, but they are hardly the only dangers now lurking in Boulder County’s flooded areas. The flood that has washed over the Front Range and Northeastern plains of Colorado has also carried with it unknown quantities of chemical and industrial wastes that can also pose health hazards.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Blake Welborn's insight:

This article is about to possible health hazards that the large Boulder flood posed to the population of the city, due to water borne diseases and proximity of the population. 

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Unit 6: Where To Find The Best Education Around The World

Unit 6: Where To Find The Best Education Around The World | Geography | Scoop.it
The United States places 17th in the developed world for education, according to a global report by education firm Pearson. Finland and South Korea, not surprisingly, top the list of 40 developed countries with the best education systems.

Via Mrs. B
Blake Welborn's insight:

By showcasing our education system as not up to far with a lot of the world, we are able to see that we will lag in economic development and the world market. 

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Mrs. B's curator insight, October 20, 2013 11:29 AM

Here is some data. Data and statistics are crucial to determining opinions and thoughts. Why do Finland and South Korea top the list? 

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Unit 6: Industrialization in Africa: Can the continent make it? - The Tony Elumelu Foundation

By Lawrence Mbae Without strong industries to create jobs and add value to raw materials, African countries risk remaining shackled by joblessness and poverty. Côte d’Ivoire and Ghana produce 53percent of the world’s cocoa. But the supermarket shelves in Abidjan and Accra, their respective capitals, are stacked with chocolates imported from Switzerland and the UK, …
Blake Welborn's insight:

Here in this article is a description of Africa's push to industrialize and how it is failing. There lack of higher job sectors and increasing out of country control on raw materials makes it very difficult more Africa to industrialize, especially south of the Sahara. 

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Unit 5: What We're Up To | Grow Food Where We Live.

Unit 5: What We're Up To | Grow Food Where We Live. | Geography | Scoop.it
Urban Patchwork is Austin’s only non-profit focused on how innovative land use and urban food production can at the same time... ...strengthen and b
Blake Welborn's insight:

This is a website promoting and and providing information on urban gardening in Austin, TX. The non profit seeks to educate the public about and spread sustainable urban gardening throughout the Austin metropolis. 

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Unit 4: The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices

Unit 4: The Political Geography of Gasoline Prices | Geography | Scoop.it
Rising gas prices make people unhappy, but the pain is felt most acutely in states where it is unlikely to make an electoral difference.
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This article splits up gas consumption in American based on the majority party of the states. It shows the price and amount of gas used on a scatter plot, with some interesting data.

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Unit 1: The Geography of Fame

Unit 1: The Geography of Fame | Geography | Scoop.it
Want to be in Wikipedia? Start by being born in the right place.
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This article takes in the perspectives of the areas where famous people in America come from, and how this could have affected their fame. This is a good example of the nature of geography, because it can be applied to a wide variety of interests and perspectives. 

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Unit 1: Looking at the World in Multiple Ways

Unit 1: Looking at the World in Multiple Ways | Geography | Scoop.it
Read about geographic perspectives in this excerpt from Geography For Life: National Geography Standards, Second Edition.
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A short and concise article detailing and comparing two perspectives of geographical spatialization. It compares environmental geography perspectives and spatial perspectives of geography. 

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Unit 6: 9 Things to Know Before Smoking Marijuana (Legally) in Colorado

Unit 6: 9 Things to Know Before Smoking Marijuana (Legally) in Colorado | Geography | Scoop.it

Via Kenneth Weene
Blake Welborn's insight:

Clarification on the laws in Colorado. This new legalization will bring about a boom in the industry of marijuana growing and the overall welfare of the economy in Colorado. 

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Kenneth Weene's curator insight, January 2, 10:46 AM

The new law in Colorado and what it means for folks living and visiting there.

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Unit 3: 10 Pieces of Pop Culture to Anticipate for 2014

Unit 3: 10 Pieces of Pop Culture to Anticipate for 2014 | Geography | Scoop.it
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This pop culture article talks about some of most anticipated movie and music pieces of the upcoming year. This shows popular cultural trends in the US and what we as a society are interested in. 

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Unit 2: canyouhearusnow: devidsketchbook: ... -

Unit 2: canyouhearusnow: devidsketchbook: ... - | Geography | Scoop.it
canyouhearusnow:
“ devidsketchbook:
“ Extraordinary photos of young hitchhikers and freight train hoppers by Mike Brodie
Mike Brodie (tumblr | facebook) first began photographing in 2004 when he was...
Blake Welborn's insight:

A very cool photoset showcasing present day migration inside the US. Provides an insight to the current population trends of the United States. 

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Unit 2: Interactive maps Mexico-USA migration channels

Unit 2: Interactive maps  Mexico-USA migration channels | Geography | Scoop.it
In several previous posts we have looked at specific migration channels connecting Mexico to the USA: From Morelos to Minnesota; case study of a migrant...

 

An excellent way to show examples of chain migration and the gravity model...students will understand the concepts with concretes examples. These interactive maps have crisp geo-visualizations of the migratory flows.


Via Seth Dixon
Blake Welborn's insight:

This map shows  some of the flows of migration out of Mexico into the US. Provides insight on the immigrant migration and where there are large concentrations of immigrants. 

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Grant Graves's curator insight, September 11, 7:39 PM

Mexico is the largest source of immigrants to the United States. In this way, tens of thousands of Mexicans citizens become American citizens every year, making up a larger and larger percentage of of the US population. However, at the same time, many Mexicans are unable to immigrate to the US due to quotas and other immigration laws. In this way, many Mexican Citizens have no choice but to stay in Mexico or cross the border illegally. I believe that the US should remove quotas and many immigration laws. If this could be done, citizenship could be given to all who want it, making more US citizens and stimulating the US economy by bringing in more jobs and tax dollars. This is due to the simple fact that illegal immigrants do not or cannot pay taxes.

Cam Morford's curator insight, October 13, 10:14 PM

Very interesting article and map regarding Mexican migration.  I'm not very familiar with Mexican states, provinces, or cities, but someone who is would find this article interesting.  It talks about each province in Mexico, how many people emigrate away from there, and where they immigrate to. 

Irvin Sierra's curator insight, October 14, 10:51 PM

This relates o the topic that we are talking about in class because it has to do with migration. This topic is showing us how many people from Mexico come to the US especially more from Morelos. I didn't think that most Mexicans would come from that sate. That's what makes it interesting because I thought that more people would migrate to the US from other parts of Mexico. Like i know a lot of people from here in Longmont who are mostly from Durango and even from Guanajuato, from where i am from. My dad actually migrated from Mexico to the US and well basically i did too as well as my mom except for my sister. My dad wanted to Migrate here so that he could have a better job and life for him and us. It sucks how the number of migrants from Mexico have slowed down, because most of the undocumented people and just the ones who come from Mexico are helping the U.S with the population as well as the jobs around here. 

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Unit 2: American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

Unit 2: American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Geography | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."


Via Seth Dixon
Blake Welborn's insight:

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US. This allows for the comparison of migration and time and the effects of migration over the years in the US. 

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 4, 2013 1:45 PM

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Emily Bian's curator insight, October 17, 7:32 PM

The center of the U.S. population moves about every 10 years. 

In our APHUG textbook, it also talked about the center moving west. It also talks about the patterns and shifts of migration in the U.S going more west and south now, than before. I wonder if the trend will continue?  

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Unit 2: 'EU needs new way to distribute refugees' | Europe | DW.DE | 29.10.2013

Unit 2: 'EU needs new way to distribute refugees' | Europe | DW.DE | 29.10.2013 | Geography | Scoop.it
In spite of the deaths of refugees in the Mediterranean, EU politicians continue to take a hard line on policy. Migration expert Jochen Oltmer says the EU must rethink the way it distributes the refugees in Europe.
Blake Welborn's insight:

this article talks about the recent boat crash near Lampedusa. It highlights the reasons the UN does not favor migration and also the several reasons it does. It is a good cost/benefit analysis of international migration. 

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Unit 3: US adults are dumber than the average human

Unit 3: US adults are dumber than the average human | Geography | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON -- It's long been known that America's school kids haven't measured well compared with international peers. Now, there's a new twist: Adults don't either.

Via Mrs. B
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A funny but disturbing video of the lack of knowledge in American adult culture regarding geography. Shows lack of knowledge and lack of care also. 

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Mrs. B's curator insight, October 19, 2013 12:09 AM

This makes me sad. I believe our nation's youth have the most potential in the world. What can we do as educators to tap into this precious resource?