(Art) & Wellbeing
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Aroha Philanthropies - The Wall

A Combination of 2D motion graphics with 3D animated characters for Aroha Philanthropies.

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These Are the People Most Likely to Get the Chills From Sad Music

These Are the People Most Likely to Get the Chills From Sad Music | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
It’s called “frisson,” or “skin orgasms.”
ille's insight:
On frisson (some scientists have called it “skin orgasms”). Those who had the strongest frisson reactions, the researchers discovered, also scored highly on openness to experience, a personality trait that encompasses appreciation of beauty, and sensitivity to one’s own feelings. Specifically, the authors found that the people who experienced the most frisson had high scores in three sub-traits of openness to experience: openness to fantasy, openness to new ideas, and openness to new values.

Past research has suggested that frisson may be a matter of emotional degree, and that people who experience it are simply feeling the emotions of a song more strongly. But the specific personality sub-traits highlighted in this study, Colver wrote, are more cognitive than emotional, suggesting a qualitative difference rather than a quantitative one — that people prone to frisson, in other words, actually process the music differently.
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Dr Martin Jordan

Dr Martin Jordan | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
Taking therapy outside - psychotherapy, sustainability and distress
ille's insight:
Introduction to Eco-psychology.
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How anxiety scrambles your brain and makes it hard to learn

How anxiety scrambles your brain and makes it hard to learn | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
Levels of stress and anxiety are on the rise among students. Juliet Rix has tips to control the panic and thrive academically
ille's insight:
Anxiety causes the body to prepare itself for fight or flight, which can interfere with students’ ability to study: anxiety involves the prefrontal cortex and the amygdala – a key region of the brain also involved in learning and memory. In someone with an anxiety problem, the brain is making incorrect decisions about what to fear and the prefrontal cortex fails to suppress the amygdala, putting the body into fight or flight mode. 
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Kaip kovoti su tinginyste? Nustokite save dresiruoti!

Kaip kovoti su tinginyste? Nustokite save dresiruoti! | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
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ille's insight:
Tingulys tinguliui nelygu. Ismoktas bejegiskumas. 
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The dream we haven't dared to dream

The dream we haven't dared to dream | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
What are your dreams? Better yet, what are your broken dreams? Dan Pallotta dreams of a time when we are as excited, curious and scientific about the development of our humanity as we are about the development of our technology. "What we fear most is that we will be denied the opportunity to fulfill our true potential," Pallotta says. "Imagine living in a world where we simply recognize that deep, existential fear in one another -- and love one another boldly because we know that to be human is to live with that fear."
ille's insight:
Touches upon spiritual materialism. Since when do we use mindfulness to increase productivity? Technology and progress is not everything.
 

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C.G. Jung Quote: “Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”

C.G. Jung Quote: “Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.” | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
C.G. Jung Quote: “Until you make the unconscious conscious, it will direct your life and you will call it fate.”
ille's insight:
Authentic Akvile. 
Silk. What do cows drink? Milk. 
Being aware. Challenging patterns in our sub-conscious mind that determine our actions and often screw us up. More: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pq_tCgDkT4
 
  
 
 
 
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How Running and Meditation Change the Brains of the Depressed

How Running and Meditation Change the Brains of the Depressed | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
New research that acts on an intriguing theory of the neurology of the mental illness.
ille's insight:
Physical and mental training — called MAP training — may provide substantial help to those with major depression due to increased neurogenesis. 
“Runners begin to understand the blessing that comes with putting the body to work and emptying the mind.”
 
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You’re Excited, Not Nervous. You Just Keep Telling Yourself That.

You’re Excited, Not Nervous. You Just Keep Telling Yourself That. | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
It’s called anxiety reappraisal.
ille's insight:
'Axiety reappraisal' - Harvard Business School psychologist Alison Wood Brooks made her study volunteers to do all manner of terrifying things: public speaking, karaoke, math. In each of these trials, she found that when the participants reframed their jitters as excitement, and not anxiety, their performance improved.
 

     
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Kurt Cobain was not a 'tortured genius', he had an illness

Kurt Cobain was not a 'tortured genius', he had an illness | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
21 years after the death of Kurt Cobain, novelist Matt Haig says the
way we glamorise the suicides of famous artists inhibits our understanding
of mental illness
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Naikan -- reconnection to ourselves | Johanna Schuh | TEDxLinz

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Johanna Schuh emphasizes the need to pause for a moment and pu
ille's insight:
NAIKAN is a structured method of self-reflection developed by Yoshimoto Ishin. Naikan practice is based on three questions: 1.What have I received from (person x)? 
2.What have I given to (person x)? 
3.What troubles and difficulties have I caused to (person x)?

A related fourth question, "What troubles and difficulties has (person x) caused me", is purposely ignored in Naikan. It presupposes that we're all naturally good at seeing answers to this fourth question, and that too much focus on this question is responsible for much of one's misery in day-to-day life.
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Elizabeth Gilbert

Elizabeth Gilbert | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
"Eat Pray Love" author Elizabeth Gilbert shares 11 ways to think smartly about creativity.
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Breaking the Perfectionism–Procrastination Infinite Loop

Breaking the Perfectionism–Procrastination Infinite Loop | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
Are you a victim of the endless loop of perfectionism and procrastination? Denise offers solid techniques to help you break free and GTD with the best of them.
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A Journey to the Center of Yourself 

A Journey to the Center of Yourself  | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
Depression is not an end point. It’s the beginning of a process. If we heed the call for growth and change, a more enriching life awaits.
ille's insight:
James Gordon: it’s inaccurate to call depression a disease, because depression doesn’t have a regular pathological set of symptoms or signs. They differ from person to person. The broader implication is that this is something that needs to be treated, almost always with medication. When we call depression a disease, we define it as something chronic and essentially out of the realm of one’s own understanding. We treat it as an enemy. In that view, depression is something to reject and suppress, rather than a situation where we have the possibility of learning what’s going wrong in our lives and how to put our lives back into balance. You either treat depression as a disease to be suppressed or you treat it as a painful opportunity to grow and change.

Finding Our Light:James Gordon’s seven stages for the journey through depression:
1. The Call
The awareness that we are depressed and that some kind of change, a journey, is necessary. 
2. Guides on the Journey 
Meeting and choosing the men and women who can help, and developing our own inner guidance and wisdom. 
3. The Surrender to Change 
Allowing and encouraging ourselves to let go of what constrains and freezes us and to move into the current of life. 
4. Dealing with Demons 
Meeting the challenges—self-doubt, loneliness, procrastination, pride, resentment, perfectionism, fear—and finding in them the unique daimon, the source of our own meaning, purpose, and direction. 
5. The Dark Night of the Soul 
Allowing and inviting the deepest life-giving freedom to emerge as we move through the despair that may come to any of us. 
6. Spirituality: The Blessing 
Experiencing the unity and peace, the love and generosity, the connection to something or someone greater than ourselves that can transform our lives.
7. The Return 
Learning to live every day joyously, deeply, consciously, with ourselves and others, in the light of what we have experienced and are always learning.
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‘Aging is not the problem — society is the problem,’ geriatrician tells Sydney crowd

‘Aging is not the problem — society is the problem,’ geriatrician tells Sydney crowd | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
SYDNEY — Dr. Bill Thomas says there’s no problem with aging; society’s reaction to it is a whole other matter.
ille's insight:
Dr. Bill Thomas: “Aging is not the problem — society is the problem. Aging is perfectly fine. It's how we treat older people, how we think about them, what we say about them and what we do to them that is not fine.” Bringing people from different generations together by intention through music and stories: "When people sing the same songs and believe the same stories we come together in a really powerful way". (Durkheim?)
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People who meditate are more aware of their unconscious brain

People who meditate are more aware of their unconscious brain | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
A twist on the famous Libet free will experiments suggests that people who meditate have more access to the unconscious brain
ille's insight:
How free are we? Conscious and unconscious brain in decision making process. Based on Benjamin Libet's experiment on free will. People who meditate may have more conscious access to their unconscious intentions. Self-awareness.
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Learning to be kind to yourself has remarkable benefits – Mark Leary | Aeon Essays

Learning to be kind to yourself when you (inevitably) make mistakes could have a remarkable effect on your happiness
ille's insight:
A great introduction to self-compassion. Although thousands of studies demonstrate that high self-esteem is associated with many good things, virtually no evidence shows that self-esteem actually causes success, happiness or other desired outcomes.
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Kelly McGonigal: How to Turn Stress Into an Advantage

About Presentation In her book, The Upside of Stress, McGonigal asks, “If you could choose how stressful tomorrow will be, would you hope for a great dea
ille's insight:
The stress paradox - the higher nation's stress index, the higher the nation's well-being and happiness. Happy people are not stress-free, stress-free life doesn't guarantee happiness. 
The stress paradox - the higher nation's stress index, the higher the nation's well-being and happiness. Happy people are not stress-free, stress-free life doesn't guarantee happiness. The mindset of meaning - people who think they experience stress regularly, find their lives to be more meaningful. Avoiding, trying to minimize or suppressing stress and other unwanted feelings are what creates toxicity and damages health, embracing it and acknowledging that it's normal to feel anxious can be beneficial. Viewing stress as a helpful part of life, rather than as harmful, is associated with better health, emotional wellbeing and productivity at work – even during periods of high stress. How you think about stress matters because it changes how you respond to stress.The three most protective beliefs about stress are: 1) to view your body’s stress response as helpful, not debilitating – for example, to view stress as energy you can use; 2) to view yourself as able to handle, and even learn and grow from, the stress in your life; and 3) to view stress as something that everyone deals with, and not something that proves how uniquely screwed up you or your life is.

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Meet Richard Davidson, Founder of the Center for Healthy Minds

Davidson is best known for his groundbreaking work studying emotion and the brain. A friend and confidante of the Dalai Lama, he is a highly sought afte
ille's insight:
Richard Davidson was encouraged by Dalai Lama to use tools of modern neuroscience to investigate kindness and compassion instead of anxiety, depression, etc. Well-being is a skill.
 

 
 
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What does depression feel like? Trust me – you really don’t want to know | Tim Lott

What does depression feel like? Trust me – you really don’t want to know | Tim Lott | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
Darker than grief, an implosion of the self, a sheet of ice: no matter how you describe it, this is a terrifying state to be trapped in
ille's insight:
Admittedly, severely depressed people can connect only tenuously with reality, but repeated studies have shown that mild to moderate depressives have a more realistic take on life than most “normal” people, a phenomenon known as “depressive realism”.

 
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It's society, not biology, that is making men more suicidal

It's society, not biology, that is making men more suicidal | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
Around thirteen men in the UK will kill themselves today, and the male suicide
rate is at a 14-year high. Is it time to accept that society has become
dangerously hostile to men, asks Mike Snelle
ille's insight:
...Alongside all this, men are taught that the highest indicator of success is economic – our financial worth is synonymous with our value as people. The constant bombardment of advertising reinforces the notion that to buy more is to be more. We are trained to be in competition with one another, and rewarded for ruthlessness. Empathy and emotional understanding are regarded as weaknesses. If you believe that men are basically decent and wired towards compassion and connection, then the current environment puts us in conflict with our nature as human beings.
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Gregg Krech - Naikan: A Method of Self-Reflection

Gregg Krech - "Naikan: A Method of Self-Reflection" at FACES Conferences, La Jolla, CA | April 1, 2011.
ille's insight:
Jiriki (self power - Morita Therapy) & Tariki (power of other - Naikan). Maxim - your life's experience is based not on your life but on the things you choose to pay attention to (negative bias - cognitive psychology)
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Why Generation Y Yuppies Are Unhappy?

Why Generation Y Yuppies Are Unhappy? | (Art) & Wellbeing | Scoop.it
Say hi to Lucy. Lucy is part of Generation Y, the generation born between the late 1970s and the mid 1990s.  She’s also part of a yuppie culture that makes up a large portio
ille's insight:
1) stay ambitious, 2) you're not special/entitled, 3) do your own shit - ignore others
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