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Most Influential Emotions on Social Networks Revealed (Anger > Joy)

Most Influential Emotions on Social Networks Revealed (Anger > Joy) | FuturICT | Scoop.it

Anger spreads faster and more broadly than joy, say computer scientists who have analysed sentiment on the Chinese Twitter-like service Weibo.

 

One well-known feature of social networks is that similar people tend to attract each other: birds of a feather flock together.

 

So an interesting question is whether these similarities cause people to behave in the same way online, whether it might lead to flocking or herding behaviour, for example.

 

Today, we get an interesting insight into this phenomena thanks to the work of Rui Fan and pals at Beihang University in China. These guys have compared the way that tweets labelled with specific emotions influence other people on the network.

 

And their conclusion is surprising. They say the results clearly show that anger is more influential than other emotions such as joy or sadness, a finding that could have significant implications for our understanding of the way information spreads through social networks.

 

These guys got their data from Weibo, a Twitter-like service that has become hugely popular in China. In just four years, it has attracted more than 500 million users who post around 100 million messages a day.

 

Research Paper: http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.2402 (Anger is More Influential Than Joy: Sentiment Correlation in Weibo Rui Fan, Jichang Zhao, Yan Chen, Ke Xu)


Via Ashish Umre, Complexity Digest
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Robustness of skeletons and salient features in networks

Real world network datasets often contain a wealth of complex topological information. In the face of these data, researchers often employ methods to extract reduced networks containing the most important structures or pathways, sometimes known as `skeletons' or `backbones'. Numerous such methods have been developed. Yet data are often noisy or incomplete, with unknown numbers of missing or spurious links. Relatively little effort has gone into understanding how salient network extraction methods perform in the face of noisy or incomplete networks. We study this problem by comparing how the salient features extracted by two popular methods change when networks are perturbed, either by deleting nodes or links, or by randomly rewiring links. Our results indicate that simple, global statistics for skeletons can be accurately inferred even for noisy and incomplete network data, but it is crucial to have complete, reliable data to use the exact topologies of skeletons or backbones. These results also help us understand how skeletons respond to damage to the network itself, as in an attack scenario.

 

Robustness of skeletons and salient features in networks
Louis M. Shekhtman, James P. Bagrow, Dirk Brockmann

http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.3797


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ComplexInsight's curator insight, October 1, 2013 12:56 PM

 Very relevent to some current work  we are doing on data modeling and data mining -  Awesome scoop  - big thanks Eugene and Complexity Digest..

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Eric Berlow and Sean Gourley: Mapping ideas worth spreading

What do 24,000 ideas look like? Ecologist Eric Berlow and physicist Sean Gourley apply algorithms to the entire archive of TEDx Talks, taking us on a stimulating visual tour to show how ideas connect globally.

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A New Kind of Economy is Born

Social Decision-Makers Beat the "Homo Economicus"
by Dirk Helbing (ETH Zurich)

http://futurict.blogspot.ie/2013/09/a-new-kind-of-economy-is-born.html

 

The Internet and Social Media change our way of decision-making. We are no longer the independent decision makers we used to be. Instead, we have become networked minds, social decision-makers, more than ever before. This has several fundamental implications. First of all, our economic theories must change, and second, our economic institutions must be adapted to support the social decision-maker, the "homo socialis", rather be tailored to the perfect egoist, known as "homo economicus".


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Luciano Lampi's curator insight, September 12, 2013 6:45 AM

who will take the lead?

Eli Levine's comment, September 24, 2013 8:53 PM
I think this is a little too optimistic and idealistic about the human condition. We are only conditional altruists, after all, and some forms of top-down regulation actually have worked (the preservation of the Pacific fisheries, for example).

In the end, we will always need to be defining, as a society, what behaviors and actions are acceptable and what aren't acceptable. It would behoove the government, and its members, to make the laws reflect the needs and will of the people who live in the society in which it governs. Self-regulation of the economy is as functional as central planning, unless you're considering the society and the government apparatus of society as part of the economy.
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Event: Collective Contagion: ECCS'13 Satellite Workshop 19 September 2013, Barcelona

Event: Collective Contagion: ECCS'13 Satellite Workshop 19 September 2013, Barcelona | FuturICT | Scoop.it

Intense scientific debate is going around the definition of the foundational concepts and appropriate methodological approaches to deal with the understanding of social dynamics. These challenges are aiming to understand human behavior in its complexity driven by intentional (and not necessarily rational) decisions and influenced by a multitude of factors. The functioning of communication-based mechanisms requires individuals to interact in order to acquire information to cope with uncertainty and thus deeply rely on the accuracy and on the completeness of information (if any). In fact, people’s perceptions, knowledge, beliefs and opinions about the world and its evolution, get (in)formed and modulated through the information they can access. Moreover their response is not linear as individuals can react by accepting, refusing, or elaborating (and changing) the received information.

Technology-mediated social collectives are taking an important role in the design of social structures. Yet our understanding of the complex mechanisms governing networks and collective behaviour is still quite shallow. Fundamental concepts like authority, leader-follower dynamics, conflict or collaboration in online networks are still not well defined and investigated – but they are crucial to illuminate the advantages and pitfalls of this form of collective decision-making (which can cancel out individual mistakes, but also make them spiral out of control).

The aim of this satellite is to address the question of ICT mediated social phenomena emerging in multiple scales ranging from the interactions of individuals to the emergence of self-organized global movements. We would like to gather researchers from different disciplines to form a forum to discuss ideas, research questions, recent results, and future challenges in this emerging area of research and public interest.

Particular attention will be devoted to the following topics:

Interdependent social contagion processPeer production and mass collaborationTemporally evolving networks and stream analyticsCognitive aspects of belief formation and revisionOnline communication and information diffusionViral propagation in online social networkCrowd-sourcing: herding behaviour vs. wisdom of crowdsE-democracy and online government-citizen interactionOnline socio-political mobilizationsPublic attention and popularity

All the participants of the satellite meeting (with or without abstract submission) must register for the European Conference on Complex Systems 2013.


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nativemedia's comment, September 24, 2013 9:23 PM
beautiful
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#FuturICT as a whole will act as a Knowledge Accelerator

#FuturICT as a whole will act as a Knowledge Accelerator | FuturICT | Scoop.it
FuturICT FET Flagship Project

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luiy's curator insight, September 4, 2013 7:15 AM

We think that integrating ICT, Complexity Science and the Social Sciences will create a paradigm shift, facilitating a symbiotic co-evolution of ICT and society.


Data from our complex globe-spanning ICT system will be leveraged to develop models of techno-socio-economic systems. In turn, insights from these models will inform the development of a new generation of socially adaptive, self-organized ICT systems.

 

FuturICT as a whole will act as a Knowledge Accelerator, turning massive data into knowledge and technological progress. In this way, FuturICT will create the scientific methods and ICT platforms needed to address planetary-scale challenges and opportunities in the 21st century. Specifically, FuturICT will build a sophisticated simulation, visualization and participation platform, called the Living Earth Platform.

This platform will power Exploratories, to detect and mitigate crises, and Participatory Platforms, to support the decision-making of policy-makers, business people and citizens, and to facilitate a better social, economic and political participation.

 

- See more at: http://www.futurict.eu/the-project/overview#sthash.Wr8y4Sin.dpuf

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Most Influential Emotions on Social Networks Revealed (Anger > Joy)

Most Influential Emotions on Social Networks Revealed (Anger > Joy) | FuturICT | Scoop.it

Anger spreads faster and more broadly than joy, say computer scientists who have analysed sentiment on the Chinese Twitter-like service Weibo.

 

One well-known feature of social networks is that similar people tend to attract each other: birds of a feather flock together.

 

So an interesting question is whether these similarities cause people to behave in the same way online, whether it might lead to flocking or herding behaviour, for example.

 

Today, we get an interesting insight into this phenomena thanks to the work of Rui Fan and pals at Beihang University in China. These guys have compared the way that tweets labelled with specific emotions influence other people on the network.

 

And their conclusion is surprising. They say the results clearly show that anger is more influential than other emotions such as joy or sadness, a finding that could have significant implications for our understanding of the way information spreads through social networks.

 

These guys got their data from Weibo, a Twitter-like service that has become hugely popular in China. In just four years, it has attracted more than 500 million users who post around 100 million messages a day.

 

Research Paper: http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.2402 (Anger is More Influential Than Joy: Sentiment Correlation in Weibo Rui Fan, Jichang Zhao, Yan Chen, Ke Xu)


Via Ashish Umre, Complexity Digest
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Abrupt rise of new machine ecology beyond human response time

Society's techno-social systems are becoming ever faster and more computer-orientated. However, far from simply generating faster versions of existing behaviour, we show that this speed-up can generate a new behavioural regime as humans lose the ability to intervene in real time. Analyzing millisecond-scale data for the world's largest and most powerful techno-social system, the global financial market, we uncover an abrupt transition to a new all-machine phase characterized by large numbers of subsecond extreme events. The proliferation of these subsecond events shows an intriguing correlation with the onset of the system-wide financial collapse in 2008. Our findings are consistent with an emerging ecology of competitive machines featuring ‘crowds’ of predatory algorithms, and highlight the need for a new scientific theory of subsecond financial phenomena.

 

Abrupt rise of new machine ecology beyond human response time
Neil Johnson Guannan Zhao Eric Hunsader Hong Qi Nicholas Johnson Jing Meng Brian Tivnan

Scientific Reports 3, Article number: 2627 http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep02627


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Ethical Impact L3C's curator insight, September 21, 2013 2:26 PM

This is proof that speed and complexity will syncronize creating patterns. This was proven earlier by a simple on/off experiment with lights. simple rules create complex patterns - you don't need conscious intervention. The impact of these patterns, however are sourced by life......

 

Fab GOUX-BAUDIMENT's curator insight, September 23, 2013 5:20 AM

here we are... at the dawn of a human-machine competition?

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#FuturICT Science and Policy Symposium Tokyo July 16, 2013


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FuturICT's curator insight, July 4, 2013 2:23 AM

Date: Tuesday, July 16, 2013Location: Embassy of Switzerland in Tokyo

The main purpose of the symposium is to intensify collaboration and to set a joint global research agenda to address and discuss the main challenges faced by our society in the realm of the new internet and communication technology era. The ultimate scope will be to highlight the ability of the scientific enterprise in creating economic growth, solving social problems, and satisfying the essential human drive to understand the world where we live. In addition to creating netwroking opportunities, the event is aimed at bringing separate branches of science and technology together, opening wider horizons for otherwise impossible collaborations.

The meeting is jointly organized by ETH Zurich and the Science & Technology Office of the Embassy of Switzerland in Tokyo.

 

This event is by invitation only.

- See more at: http://www.futurict.eu/event/futurict-science-and-policy-symposium#sthash.Us8pWkOD.dpuf

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Event: Multiplex Networks 2013: Towards the understanding of a complex world. Barcelona, September 19th

Event: Multiplex Networks 2013: Towards the understanding of a complex world. Barcelona, September 19th | FuturICT | Scoop.it

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JudyHalle's comment, September 7, 2013 1:29 AM
brilliant
JudyHalle's comment, September 7, 2013 1:29 AM
awesome