Futurewaves
3.2K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
onto Futurewaves
Scoop.it!

Web Semantics: machine-generated journalism | Beyond The Beyond

Web Semantics: machine-generated journalism | Beyond The Beyond | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

“Last fall, the Big Ten Network began using Narrative Science for updates of football and basketball games. Those reports helped drive a surge in referrals to the Web site from Google’s search algorithm, which highly ranks new content on popular subjects, Mr. Calderon says. The network’s Web traffic for football games last season was 40 percent higher than in 2009.

more...
No comment yet.
Futurewaves
Exploring future trends
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Google’s 3 Secrets To Designing Perfect Conversations

Google’s 3 Secrets To Designing Perfect Conversations | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

We’ve all been frustrated when talking to a computer. Maybe it can’t understand what you’re saying. Maybe it hears you, but doesn’t understand what you mean. Or maybe it’s just a tedious chat with a cloying personality with whom you’d never choose to associate in real life.

Such are the problems of designing voice interfaces. In theory, voice is the ultimate medium–one people don’t have to learn to use. “Users are instant experts. There’s nothing to teach, or at least there shouldn’t be,” says Daniel Padgett, conversational design lead at Google. “It’s something that they’ve been doing forever. Because of that, they have high expectations.”

However, the fact that human speech is so nuanced and contextually driven makes a serious challenge for any designer or company looking to break into this new medium. And voice interfaces aren’t just for companies like Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Apple anymore. Now that more and more businesses actually build their own chatbots for shopping and customer support, it’s a skill more companies need to learn.

At Google’s big I/O conference last week, conversational experts from across the company gave half a dozen different talks about the best practices of designing dialogs between people and computers. We listened in–and compiled the best bits into three overarching tips.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Meet the People Who Train the Robots (to Do Their Own Jobs)

Meet the People Who Train the Robots (to Do Their Own Jobs) | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO — What if part of your job became teaching a computer everything you know about doing someone’s job — perhaps your own?

Before the machines become smart enough to replace humans, as some people fear, the machines need teachers. Now, some companies are taking the first steps, deploying artificial intelligence in the workplace and asking their employees to train the A.I. to be more human.

We spoke with five people — a travel agent, a robotics expert, an engineer, a customer-service representative and a scriptwriter, of sorts — who have been put in this remarkable position. More than most, they understand the strengths (and weaknesses) of artificial intelligence and how the technology is changing the nature of work.

Here are their stories.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

What Has Digital Health Ever Done For Us? Well, At Least 60 Things! - The Medical Futurist

What Has Digital Health Ever Done For Us? Well, At Least 60 Things! - The Medical Futurist | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

I get a lot of questions after my keynotes and online either from patients or physicians about what digital health has ever done for us. They ask this as if digital health was non-existent or not useful. As if medicine should be practiced and healthcare should be delivered like it has been for hundreds of years. While we need to preserve real values such as the human touch and the creativity of physicians, the future will be and must be technological and digital.

The era of technological advances we live in brought new opportunities for improving care; and digital health is the essence of the transition. So instead of a long philosophical essay about why digital health is the only way to go, I give you 60 responses to the pressing question: what digital health has ever done for us.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Algorithm predicts epileptic seizures in real-time - Futurity

Algorithm predicts epileptic seizures in real-time - Futurity | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
A new system could detect seizures in patients with epilepsy before they happen—and potentially stop them in advance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Next List 2017: 20 Tech Visionaries You Should Have Heard of by Now

Next List 2017: 20 Tech Visionaries You Should Have Heard of by Now | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
MICROSOFT WILL BUILD computers even more sleek and beautiful than Apple’s. Robots will 3-D-print cool shoes that are personalized just for you. (And you’ll get them in just a few short days.) Neural networks will take over medical diagnostics, and Snapchat will try to take over the entire world. The women and men in these pages are the technical, creative, idealistic visionaries who are bringing the future to your doorstep. You might not recognize their names—they’re too busy working to court the spotlight—but you’ll soon hear about them a lot. They represent the best of what’s next.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

As climate dangers grow, it might be time to begin limited geoengineering experiments

As climate dangers grow, it might be time to begin limited geoengineering experiments | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
As climate change accelerates, a handful of scientists are eager to move ahead with experiments testing ways to counteract warming artificially. Their reasoning: we just might get desperate enough to use this technology one day.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

A prescription for the future: How hospitals could be rebuilt, better than before | The Economist

A prescription for the future: How hospitals could be rebuilt, better than before | The Economist | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

IN A nondescript part of Cleveland, in a room known as the bunker, a doctor, nurses and medical technicians gather to keep watch over 150 patients in special-care units and intensive-care beds. Their patients are scattered around the region, in clinics that have no specialists covering the night shift. On a wall of beeping screens the bunker team members track their charges vital signs. They can zoom in on any patient via a camera at the foot of each bed. “These here are PVCs [premature ventricular contractions]; they’re bad things,” says Jim Goldstein, a cardiac technician, pointing to a graph of a patient’s heartbeat. The PVCs are getting worse, warns a flashing light. It’s time to alert a nurse on the ground.

Health-care providers such as the Cleveland Clinic, the big American hospital group that runs this remote intensive-care unit (ICU), are rethinking the way hospitals work. Today, hospitals are where patients go for consultations with specialists, and where specialists, with the help of medical technicians and pricey machinery, diagnose their ills. They are also the main setting for surgery and medical interventions such as chemotherapy; and where sick people go for monitoring and care. But high-speed internet, remote-monitoring technology and the crunching of vast amounts of data are about to change all that. In the coming years a big chunk of those activities—and nearly all the monitoring and care—could move elsewhere.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Everything

How Artificial Intelligence Will Change Everything | Futurewaves | Scoop.it


Artificial intelligence is not one technology but rather a group of related technologies – including natural language processing, machine learning (computer programs that can “learn” when exposed to new data) and expert systems (software programmed to provide advice) – that help machines sense, comprehend, and act in ways similar to the human brain. These technologies are behind innovations such as virtual agents (computer-generated, animated characters serving as online customer service representatives), identity analytics (solutions combining big data and advanced analytics to help manage user access and certification), and recommendation systems (algorithms helping match users and providers of goods and services) which have already transformed the ways in which companies look at the overall customer experience.

Artificial intelligence can help banks’ finance teams reimagine and restructure operating models and processes. Large banks must process huge volumes of data to generate financial reports and satisfy regulatory and compliance requirements. These processes are increasingly standardized and formulaic but still involve large numbers of people performing low-value-added tasks (often in reconciliation and consolidation). This makes them ideal candidates for robotic process automation (RPA). The software “bots” used in RPA can be coded to deal with rules and some exceptions, but it’s the added layer of machine learning across the more complex challenges and frequently changing tasks that make the combination of RPA and AI particularly powerful.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

This isn’t sci-fi: A space-based sharing economy powered by nano-satellites could save humanity

This isn’t sci-fi: A space-based sharing economy powered by nano-satellites could save humanity | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The rise of the internet and the ubiquity of mobile computing devices have changed everything from travel and shopping to politics – think Uber, Amazon and Twitter.

But for the next revolution in commerce, governance and social interaction we need to look up – about 100 miles up, into the low Earth orbit. There, falling prices for communication and earth monitoring satellites, along with blockchain-enabled security, will make everything from broadband communication to crop monitoring available not just to technology elites, but to the most remote farm, village or machine.

This sharing economy in space could give even those not employed by large corporations or governments access to real-time, trustworthy data about everything from weather patterns and economic outlooks to cross-border migrations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Precision Medicine Is Our Best Hope In The Fight Against Cancer - The Medical Futurist

Precision Medicine Is Our Best Hope In The Fight Against Cancer - The Medical Futurist | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
In the fight against cancer, precision medicine is one of the most promising tools and the logical outcome of current healthcare trends.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

List of the world's top female futurists (Update #2) - Ross Dawson

There are many outstanding female futurists. AHT provides an ongoing list of the world's best talent in the futures field, focusing on women futurists.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Elon Musk Will Need a Masterplan in Digital Health Too - The Medical Futurist

Elon Musk Will Need a Masterplan in Digital Health Too - The Medical Futurist | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

What we need, is a plan. Though Mr. Musk might jump into healthcare to make this revolution happen, we already know how we could bring science fiction to reality. Here are the four grand challenges that we need to tackle:
1) We need to embrace disruptive technologies
Technological advance is not the solution for healthcare problems, I acknowledge that, but I firmly believe that only disruption can change healthcare from the bottom. We need to massively discuss worldwide how amazing and dangerous disruptive technologies can be. This way we can prepare in time.

2) We must put patients in the center of care
This is an ongoing movement worldwide, but we are far from finishing the job. We have to invite patients and their organizations to every project from hospital advisory boards to conferences in order to let their voices heard. They are the most important elements in healthcare and today we design care without their participation. This must stop.

3) We need to shift from treatment to prevention
We will spend a similar amount of knowledge, money and energy on preventive care, but this will allow us to catch diseases and even prevent them from arising in time. This is only possible with measuring data at home, at the practice and in hospitals. The swarm of wearable sensors and portable diagnosti devices should be incorporated into everyday care.

4) We need to digitize the process of care
We can only improve a system if we measure data in it. Today’s healthcare fails at this. Let’s measure and analyze the vast amounts of data from medical records, patients’ sensors and insurance claims with Watson-like algorithms.

I think Elon Musk’s vision for a cleaner, safer and more efficient world is an example to follow. Imagine how our lives would change if that most important of all industries, healthcare would be similarly transformed. I invite you all to join me in making this change happen. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Artificial Intelligence (AI) @ SXSW - Koneksa Mondo

Artificial Intelligence (AI) @ SXSW - Koneksa Mondo | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Ieder jaar komt onderzoeks- en adviesbureau Gartner met een update van haar hype cycles waarin het de stand van zaken schetst vwb technologische ontwikkelingen zoals social media, cloud computing, mobile, etc. Deze hype cycles vergelijk ik al jaren met elkaar … Lees verder →
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Nike's moonshot, facial payments and more - JWT Intelligence

Nike's moonshot, facial payments and more - JWT Intelligence | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Spray-on touchscreens, Mental Health Month, the rise and fall of influencer marketing.

–Adweek goes inside Nike’s “moonshot” attempt to crack the two-hour marathon record; while unsuccessful, the ambitious stunt helped establish Nike’s “athletic cred.”

–MIT Technology Review highlights Face++, a Chinese face-detecting startup that can now authorize payments, as one of its ten breakthrough technologies.

–A new conductive system from Carnegie Mellon called Electrick can be sprayed on any surface, adding a touchscreen to everyday objects. Via the Verge.

–For Mental Health Month, Instagram is building communities to raise “awareness about mental health and the importance of finding support.” Via Fortune.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Our Machines Now Have Knowledge We’ll Never Understand

Our Machines Now Have Knowledge We’ll Never Understand | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence is making the limits of human knowledge painfully obvious
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Johnson & Johnson Wants to Use 3D Printing to Heal Broken Bones

Johnson & Johnson Wants to Use 3D Printing to Heal Broken Bones | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

.The bone health-focused J&J unit has snapped up 3D printing tech from Tissue Regeneration Systems, Inc. (TRS). The platform is able to create implantable bone-like structures that have a special type of coating that helps the body absorb them and use them to help heal injuries and deformities. It can be used in bones throughout the body, including the face and skull. J&J didn't disclose the financial details for the deal

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Tech Made Cities Too Expensive. Here’s How to Fix It

Tech Made Cities Too Expensive. Here’s How to Fix It | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

IN 2013 PROTESTS broke out in Oakland, California, directed against the private buses that shuttle tech workers from pricey homes in the city’s gentrifying areas to jobs in Silicon Valley. “You live your comfortable lives,” read a flyer that protesters handed out to passengers, “surrounded by poverty, homelessness, and death, seemingly oblivious to everything around you, lost in the big bucks and success.”

That moment of backlash was an outgrowth of what I call the New Urban Crisis: the decline of middle-class neighborhoods, the gentrification of the downtowns of certain cities, and the reshaping of America’s metropolitan regions into islands of advantage surrounded by larger swaths of disadvantage.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

We're Entering A New Era of Mass Collaboration

In a networked world, the best way to become a dominant player is to be an indispensable partner
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

A Chip Revolution Will Bring Better VR Sooner Than You Think

A Chip Revolution Will Bring Better VR Sooner Than You Think | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

DAVID KOSSLYN AND Ian Thompson are the founders of a virtual reality company called Angle Technologies. Two years into this stealth project, backed by $8 million in funding, they won’t say much about the virtual world they’re building—at least not publicly. But they will say that they’re building it in a way that alters the relationship between computer hardware and software. When a PC or a game console runs this virtual world, the GPU chips play an unexpectedly large role, taking so much of the burden off the main processor.

GPU is short for graphics processing unit. These chips were originally designed as a better way of rendering graphics for games and other software. And they still play this all-important role for the virtual world under development at Angle. But that’s not all. Kosslyn and Thompson are shifting countless other tasks onto these chips, just because GPUs are so good at running so many calculations in parallel. A single machine can hold hundreds of GPU chips, and each chip can operate largely on its own.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Artificial evolution aims to create life out of non-living matter

Artificial evolution aims to create life out of non-living matter | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Evolution is the generally-accepted answer to how life arose, but how did non-living matter transition into living organisms? A team at the University of Wisconsin-Madison is trying to recreate the cradle of life, by gently rocking a combination of key minerals and organic molecules to see if certain chemical reactions give birth to life. If life emerges "easily" from these conditions, it could change our understanding of how common life might be across the universe.

Synthetic life has been created in a lab before. Back in 2010, scientists successfully created a brand-new bacteria by injecting a computer-designed genome into an existing cell, which was then able to replicate itself. A few years later, another team built artificial, self-assembling cell membranes, which could act like the "hardware" to house an artificial genome. More recently, researchers developed a semi-synthetic organism with extra genetic information in its DNA.

But if those scientists were essentially "playing God" by directly creating new life, the UW-Madison project is "playing Mother Nature" by trying to recreate the overall process of evolution itself.

The study of life's beginnings, or abiogenesis, has been ongoing for the better part of a century, and there are several theories for how non-living molecules first gave rise to living cells. Probably the best known is the idea of primordial soup, which suggests that when sources of energy, such as lightning or sunlight, interacted with Earth's early atmosphere, organic compounds would have formed and interacted with each other. These eventually gave rise to amino acids – the building blocks of life – and in turn, simple life forms.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Old Mice Made Young Again With New Anti-Aging Drug

Old Mice Made Young Again With New Anti-Aging Drug | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

There’s something eerily dystopian about the lives of cells.

Like the young heroes in popular teen novels, cells are born into stringent organ “societies,” destined to perform specific roles preordained by their DNA expression. Like the bodies they inhabit, cells have limited lifespans, and when they grow old, they begin leaking toxic molecules into their surroundings.

To protect the body, aged cells undergo the ultimate sacrifice: they switch on molecular machinery that results in their own death—a process beautifully named “apoptosis,” meaning the “gentle falling of leaves” in ancient Greek.

But sometimes aged cells go rogue. Rather than committing suicide, these cells lurk in our hearts, livers, kidneys and brains, where they silently promote disease. Scientists have long suspected that these “senescent” cells cause us to age, but getting rid of them without harming normal, healthy cells has been challenging.

Now, a collaborative effort between the Erasmus University in the Netherlands and the Buck Institute for Research on Aging in California may have a solution. Published in the prestigious journal Cell, the team developed a chemical torpedo that, after injecting into mice, zooms to senescent cells and puts them out of their misery, while leaving healthy cells alone.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

The power of humans: how companies will compete with humanity against AI - Ross Dawson

The power of humans: how companies will compete with humanity against AI - Ross Dawson | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

I was recently interviewed for an interesting article in The Guardian Brand human: why efficient automation will not always be best for business.

The main thrust of the article was about whether companies would choose to hire humans rather than use machines to win customers and improve perception of their brand. It is an interesting point, though I view it as fairly unlikely that consumers will actively shift their buying to companies that hire humans in roles that machines could do.

The point I emphasized is that it is very narrow to think of the current shifts as replacing human jobs with AI – that view is deluded and cannot create tomorrow’s companies.

Success will lie in reconfiguring work and organizations to take into account the complementary capabilities of humans and machines. But it is also about bringing out the best of people, having them truly express their unique capabilities in relationships, creativity and expertise.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

78 Skills that will be Difficult to Automate

78 Skills that will be Difficult to Automate | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In Japan, becoming an itamae of sushi requires years of on-the-job training and apprenticeship.

For this reason I asked Deb if she would prefer eating sushi that was prepared by humans or the same kind of meals prepared by machines. After thinking about it for a bit, she said that she’d prefer having a human chef because she liked the inconsistencies that go along with having a person at the cutting board.

For her, machines meant perfect consistency and perfectly prepared meals and that was less appealing than a human-centric operation with randomness added to the equation.

The key point here is that when it comes to automation, the marketplace will decide, and the market is not always logical.

We still go to concerts even though listening to prerecorded music at home is safer, more comfortable, and oftentimes better quality.
We still go to museums even though we can witness most of the images online without having to wait in lines and fight crowds.
We still go to coffee shops even though we can brew the same kind of coffee at home for far less money.
In each of these cases, the value of the experience far outweighs the incongruity of decisions being made.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

CeBIT 2017- Ray Kurzweil Keynote: The Future is Brighter Than We Think.

Ray Kurzweil is probably the most qualified individual to talk about the future of technology. He does it at CeBIT in a captivating presentation about technologies that will be as important as the internet. Ray is an Inventor, Entrepreneur, Futurist, Writer, founder of the Singularity University and now at Google. (Intro is temporally missing). March 2017
more...
nukem777's curator insight, March 29, 4:29 AM

rather doubt that Ray is the "most qualified" any longer