Futurewaves
3.3K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
onto Futurewaves
Scoop.it!

Waarom wij de Chinezen moeten kopiëren - De Standaard

Waarom wij de Chinezen moeten kopiëren - De Standaard | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Tim Driesen, creative partner bij Famous Brussel trok dit jaar voor het eerst naar #AWEurope. Hij zag er hoe China anders kijkt naar digitale innovatie, en...
more...
No comment yet.
Futurewaves
Exploring future trends
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Everything will be a Tech Product Soon

Everything will be a Tech Product Soon | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
“Internet of Things” is no longer just a buzzword companies add in their briefings to accentuate their launch. It has finally begun to impact the present rather than betting on the future. It has attained a momentum which has been growing exponentially and is being constantly stretched to products which weren’t even on the technological radar a few quarters ago. Despite what you might believe, the connected age is truly upon us, and we are closer than ever to a world where everything will be a tech product.

Okay, hear me out before dismissing the theory altogether. This probably won’t be true for another five years for everyone, but as I look around my room, I realize that most of the products are already being fundamentally reformed to embed a chip. IDC estimates a total of 14.8 billion connected devices at the time of writing of this article, and it is expected to reach a whopping 36.1 billion (growing at a rate of 19.4%) over the next four years.

Parv Sharma from Counterpoint adds, “In the modern tech world almost every product be it from household to an enterprise level is now connected. Internet of things (IoT) is the enabler for a modern connected world and thus is bringing “Everything is a tech product” statement closer to reality. IoT is and will be the biggest technological revolution, IoT promises an ecosystem where devices used in day to day activities will not only be connected but sharing, analyzing and implementing actions on their own.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

China’s blueprint to crush the US robotics industry

China’s blueprint to crush the US robotics industry | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
About four years ago Jeff Burnstein attended his first China International Robotics Show, the annual Shanghai-based expo now in its seventh year. At the time, Burnstein, president of the Robotic Industries Association, a Michigan-based trade group, wasn't impressed. He said he walked around the show and thought many of the robots on display looked like copies of what American companies were already doing.

In today's China a different picture is taking shape, courtesy of a blueprint known as the Made in China 2025 plan. Announced in 2015, the initiative is China's massive government-backed push to be a world leader in a number of high-tech industries, such as medical devices, aerospace equipment and robotics — the key piece of the country's desire to automate sectors of its economy: automotive manufacturing, food production, electronics and more.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Connecting a Human Brain to the Internet in Real Time

Connecting a Human Brain to the Internet in Real Time | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Summary: A new project dubbed Brainternet can turn the brain into an Internet of Things node online.

Source: Wits.

Can you read my mind? In research thought to be a world first, biomedical engineers at Wits are connecting a human brain to the internet in real time.

The ‘Brainternet’ project streams brainwaves onto the internet. Essentially, it turns the brain into an Internet of Things (IoT) node on the World Wide Web. IoT refers to connecting any device with an on and off switch to the internet.

Brainternet is the brainchild of Adam Pantanowitz, a lecturer in the Wits School of Electrical and Information Engineering, who supervised fourth-years Jemma-Faye Chait and Danielle Winter in its development.

“Brainternet is a new frontier in brain-computer interface systems. There is a lack of easily understood data about how a human brain works and processes information. Brainternet seeks to simplify a person’s understanding of their own brain and the brains of others. It does this through continuous monitoring of brain activity as well as enabling some interactivity,” explains Pantanowitz.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Designer Creates Amazing Tents That Can Collect Water and Harvest Energy from the Sun

Designer Creates Amazing Tents That Can Collect Water and Harvest Energy from the Sun | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
A designer bases her design on temporary huts of nomadic tribes, to provide a solution for this increasingly relevant problem of the not too distant future,
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

'Alarm bells we cannot ignore': world hunger rising for first time this century

'Alarm bells we cannot ignore': world hunger rising for first time this century | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The number of hungry people in the world has increased for the first time since the turn of the century, sparking concern that conflict and climate change could be reversing years of progress.

In 2016, the number of chronically undernourished people reached 815 million, up 38 million from the previous year. The increase is due largely to the proliferation of violence and climate-related shocks, according to the state of food insecurity and nutrition in 2017, a report produced by five UN agencies.

Poll reveals 85% of Americans oblivious to hunger in Africa and Middle East

The study also noted a rise in the number of people globally who are chronically hungry, from 10.6% in 2015 to 11% in 2016.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

What Philosophers Say About the Inevitability of Virtual Reality

What Philosophers Say About the Inevitability of Virtual Reality | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

A few months ago, I pulled on an Oculus Rift headset for the first time and stepped into a virtual reality meeting room. I was there to tape an early screen test for Conundrums, Slate’s new virtual reality talk show. My role was simple: I had been told that I was going to play the part of a famous comedic actor and that I just had to answer questions about his favorite sports teams. Though I am rarely funny and know almost nothing about sports, I was game to pretend. What else is virtual reality for? Alone in the space, I started fiddling with the tools. Before long, I had figured out how to change the appearance of my environment. Soon my original surroundings vanished, replaced by a photographic 360-degree panorama of a gorgeous plain. I was somewhere far in the north. In the sky above me, the aurora borealis rippled like a living crown. When a colleague appeared a little later, he was transfixed. “This will end civilization,” he said. “No one is ever going to leave home again.”  I suspect he was being hyperbolic, but there was something earnest in his awe. He would hardly have been the first to detect a sinister edge to the appeal of virtual reality. In her book Magic and Loss, Virginia Heffernan writes, “Sometimes when I listened to developers talk about their eagerness to ‘immerse’ audiences in multisensory experiences, I thought I detected a less savory desire to imprison them in programming, to leave them with no sensory exit.”Virtual reality has long been something of a stand-in for all forms of digital technology. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Intelligence and the DNA Revolution

Intelligence and the DNA Revolution | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

More than 60 years ago, Francis Crick and James Watson discovered the double-helical structure of deoxyribonucleic acid—better known as DNA. Today, for the cost of a Netflix subscription, you can have your DNA sequenced to learn about your ancestry and proclivities. Yet, while it is an irrefutable fact that the transmission of DNA from parents to offspring is the biological basis for heredity, we still know relatively little about the specific genes that make us who we are.
That is changing rapidly through genome-wide association studies—GWAS, for short. These studies search for differences in people’s genetic makeup—their “genotypes”—that correlate with differences in their observable traits—their “phenotypes.” In a GWAS recently published in Nature Genetics, a team of scientists from around the world analyzed the DNA sequences of 78,308 people for correlations with general intelligence, as measured by IQ tests.
The major goal of the study was to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms—or SNPs—that correlate significantly with intelligence test scores. Found in most cells throughout the body, DNA is made up of four molecules called nucleotides, referred to by their organic bases: cytosine (C), thymine (T), adenine (A), and guanine (G). Within a cell, DNA is organized into structures called chromosomes­. Humans normally have 23 pairs of chromosomes, with one in each pair inherited from each parent. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Beter lopen met geprinte ‘3D-heup’ | MedicalFacts.nl

Beter lopen met geprinte ‘3D-heup’ | MedicalFacts.nl | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Voor het eerst in Nederland is een 3D-geprinte plaat gebruikt om een ‘afgegleden heupkop’ te corrigeren. Orthopedisch chirurg Melinda Witbreuk van OLVG Amsterdam plaatste het plaatje op de heupkop van een 13-jarige patiënt. Hiermee is de scheefstaande heup flink gecorrigeerd en kan het meisje straks een stuk beter lopen.

‘Met de 3D-print van de heup was het mogelijk om voor de operatie een plaat te maken die precies bij deze heupkop past. Hiermee konden we de heup beter corrigeren en staat het been van de patiënt een stuk rechter. Een verbetering in vergelijking met de gangbare methode’, aldus dr. Melinda Witbreuk van OLVG.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

A robot named 'Pepper' is here to take care of all your funeral needs

A robot named 'Pepper' is here to take care of all your funeral needs | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

TOKYO, Aug 23 (Reuters) - A Japanese company has introduced a new role for SoftBank's humanoid robot "Pepper" - a Buddhist priest for hire at funerals.

Chanting sutras in a computerized voice while tapping a drum, the robot was on display on Wednesday at a funeral industry fair - the Life Ending Industry Expo - in Tokyo

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Civilization Is Breaking Down—Here's What We Need to Do About It

Civilization Is Breaking Down—Here's What We Need to Do About It | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

I think civilization is fundamentally breaking down today.” These were the opening words of Salim Ismail’s talk at Singularity University’s Global Summit in San Francisco this week.

Not the most uplifting intro. But the good news is, Ismail had some pretty unique insight to share about the nature of the problems society is facing, and plenty of thoughts on how to fix them too.

Ismail is the best-selling author of Exponential Organizations and a sought-after strategist and tech entrepreneur who built and sold his company to Google. He was founding executive director at Singularity University and has been the company’s global ambassador for the last seven years.

While technology has helped civilization, according to Ismail, it’s also partly to blame for widespread discontent that’s manifesting in the form of armed conflicts, terrorism, extremism, and nationalism.

“Never before have we had a dozen technologies all accelerating in their own right,” he said. “Each one is doubling at a rate of anywhere between 18 to 30 months. But where they intersect, that adds a whole other multiplier to the equation.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

7 Chinese superstructures that leave the rest of the world in the shade

7 Chinese superstructures that leave the rest of the world in the shade | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
China’s economic power has grown at breakneck speed. Its ever-strengthening political might reflects that fact, as does an increase in its military muscle. But there are other, less obvious, areas in which China is rapidly becoming a world leader.

The country's infrastructure is racing to keep up with its economic growth and, as it does so, we are seeing many new engineering projects on a truly remarkable scale.

Here are some of the Asian giant's most significant projects.

World’s largest floating solar power plant

China invests more each year in wind, hydro and solar power than any other country on earth. It has many major projects under construction and recently switched on the world’s largest floating solar power plant.

Floating over a flooded former coal-mine, the facility is located in the city of Huainan, in China’s eastern Anhui province. It has a capacity of 40 megawatts (MW), enough to power a small town.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Breakthrough device heals organs with a single touch

Breakthrough device heals organs with a single touch | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Ohio State's College of Engineering have developed a new technology, Tissue Nanotransfection (TNT), that can generate any cell type of interest for treatment within the patient's own body. This technology may be used to repair injured tissue or restore function of aging tissue, including organs, blood vessels and nerve cells.

Results of the regenerative medicine study published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
"By using our novel nanochip technology, injured or compromised organs can be replaced. We have shown that skin is a fertile land where we can grow the elements of any organ that is declining," said Dr. Chandan Sen, director of Ohio State's Center for Regenerative Medicine & Cell Based Therapies, who co-led the study with L. James Lee, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering with Ohio State's College of Engineering in collaboration with Ohio State's Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

A Six-Legged Insectile Robot Is Just As Creepy As It Sounds

A Six-Legged Insectile Robot Is Just As Creepy As It Sounds | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

THE UNCANNY VALLEY teems with creepy humanoids—machines not quite perfect enough to be mistaken for people, but not quite comically robotic enough to be endearing. Lately, they've been joined by robo-animals, like the mechanical dog from Boston Dynamics that not-at-all-unsettlingly regains its balance if you kick it.
Now, a new robot is scuttling into the uncanny valley. Hexa has six legs, looks like a bug, and moves with bizarre confidence. And it just might bring robot hacking to the masses.
Hexa uses a variety of sensors to find its way around, including a camera and distance sensor. You control this bot with your phone, and it scales steps and uneven terrain with ease. You don't have to control individual legs to stagger up a step, either—Hexa automatically summits obstacles along the way

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Automatica – Robots that play drums, guitar and turntables and destroy a warehouse

Humans are constantly fascinated by music-playing robots. There is something profoundly compelling about watching a mechanical being imitate the art and skill of playing a musical instrument. The latest crazy robot musical symphony comes in Automatica – a project that enlists several industrial robots to form a giant mechanical orchestra, with amazing and destructive results.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

How Quantum Computers Will Revolutionize Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning And Big Data

How Quantum Computers Will Revolutionize Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning And Big Data | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Quantum computers promise to give us computing power that is millions or even billion times faster than the computers in use today. This will transform the fields of big data, artificial intelligence and machine learning, which today often operate at the very limits of computing capabilities.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Alphabet is reportedly considering investing $1 billion in Lyft

Alphabet is reportedly considering investing $1 billion in Lyft | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Google's parent company, Alphabet, is in talks to invest about $1 billion in Lyft, according to published reports.

The talks are being driven by top officials at Alphabet, according to the news website Axios. The potential investment could come either from Google or from CapitalG, Alphabet's investment division, Bloomberg reported.

Representatives of both Alphabet and Lyft representative declined to comment on the potential investment.

The two companies have already forged strong ties. In May, Alphabet's self-driving car unit, Waymo, signed a deal with Lyft to collaborate on autonomous-vehicle technology.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

You Are Already Living Inside a Computer

You Are Already Living Inside a Computer | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Suddenly, everything is a computer. Phones, of course, and televisions. Also toasters and door locks, baby monitors and juicers, doorbells and gas grills. Even faucets. Even garden hoses. Even fidget spinners. Supposedly “smart” gadgets are everywhere, spreading the gospel of computation to everyday objects.

It’s enough to make the mundane seem new—for a time anyway. But quickly, doubts arise. Nobody really needs smartphone-operated bike locks or propane tanks. And they certainly don’t need gadgets that are less trustworthy than the “dumb” ones they replace, a sin many smart devices commit. But people do seem to want them—and in increasing numbers. There are now billions of connected devices, representing a market that might reach $250 billion in value by 2020.

Why? One answer is that consumers buy what is on offer, and manufacturers are eager to turn their dumb devices smart. Doing so allows them more revenue, more control, and more opportunity for planned obsolescence. It also creates a secondary market for data collected by means of these devices. Roomba, for example, hopes to deduce floor plans from the movement of its robotic home vacuums so that it can sell them as business intelligence.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

An artificially intelligent baby could unlock the secrets of human nature

An artificially intelligent baby could unlock the secrets of human nature | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
BabyX, the virtual, artificially intelligent creation of Mark Sagar and his new company, Soul Machines Ltd., looks, sounds, and acts so much like a real baby that interacting with her produces a genuine emotional response — just like the kind you get when a real baby coos and giggles at you. That’s exactly the point: BabyX makes it appealing to humans to interact with an AI, and each instance of interaction teaches her more about what it’s like being human.

Sagar is a force for the humanization of AI, which he believes may be important to installing a symbiotic relationship between humans and AIs. Many AI experts argue that robots and AI systems can only realize their full potential if they become more like humans, with emotions and memories informing their behavior and decision; those are the things that motivate us to seek out new experiences.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Do We Need a Speedometer for Artificial Intelligence?

Do We Need a Speedometer for Artificial Intelligence? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
MICROSOFT SAID LAST week that it had achieved a new record for the accuracy of software that transcribes speech. Its system missed just one in 20 words on a standard collection of phone call recordings—matching humans given the same challenge.
The result is the latest in a string of recent findings that some view as proof that advances in artificial intelligence are accelerating, threatening to upend the economy. Some software has proved itself better than people at recognizing objects such as cars or cats in images, and Google’s AlphaGo software has overpowered multiple Go champions—a feat that until recently was considered a decade or more away. Companies are eager to build on this progress; mentions of AI on corporate earnings calls have grown more or less exponentially.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Chill: Robots Won’t Take All Our Jobs

Chill: Robots Won’t Take All Our Jobs | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

LAST YEAR, THE Japanese company SoftBank opened a cell phone store in Tokyo and staffed it entirely with sales associates named Pepper. This wasn’t as hard as it sounds, since all the Peppers were robots.
Humanoid robots, to be more precise, which SoftBank describes as “kindly, endearing, and surprising.” Each Pepper is equipped with three multidirectional wheels, an anticollision system, multiple sensors, a pair of arms, and a chest-mounted tablet that allows customers to enter information. Pepper can “express his own emotions” and use a 3-D camera and two HD cameras “to identify movements and recognize the emotions on the faces of his interlocutors.”

The talking bot can supposedly identify joy, sadness, anger, and surprise and determine whether a person is in a good or bad mood—abilities that Pepper’s engineers figured would make “him” an ideal personal assistant or salesperson. And sure enough, there are more than 10,000 Peppers now at work in SoftBank stores, Pizza Huts, cruise ships, homes, and elsewhere.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

This 23-year-old just closed her second fund — which is focused on aging — with $22 million

This 23-year-old just closed her second fund — which is focused on aging — with $22 million | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Laura Deming is not your typical venture capitalist. Then again, she isn’t typical in many ways.

For starters, the 23-year-old, New Zealand native was home schooled, developing along the way a love of math and physics and, perhaps most interestingly, the biology of aging. In fact, she became so preoccupied with the latter that at age 11, Deming wrote to Cynthia Kenyon, a renowned molecular biologist who specializes in the genetics of aging, asking if she could visit Kenyon’s San Francisco lab during a family trip to the Bay Area. Kenyon said yes. When, soon after the visit, Deming asked if she could work in the lab, Kenyon said yes again.

Deming’s family moved to the U.S. to make it possible, and it’s highly doubtful they regret the decision. Indeed, by age 14, Deming was a student at MIT, and two years after that — at the tender age of 16 — she was a college drop-out, having been accepted into Peter Thiel’s two-year-old Thiel Fellowship program, which gives $100,000 to young people “who want to build new things.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

10 Artificial Intelligence (AI) Technologies that will rule 2018 - KnowStartup

10 Artificial Intelligence (AI) Technologies that will rule 2018 - KnowStartup | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Here are the 10 most revolutionary artificial intelligence technologies that will rule 2018.

1. Natural Language Generation
2. Speech recognition
3. Machine Learning Platforms
4. Virtual Agents
5. Decision Management
6. AI-Optimized Hardware

7. Deep learning platforms

8. Robotic Process Automation

9. Text Analytics and NLP 

10. Biometrics 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

Elon Musk en andere CEO's vragen VN-verbod voor 'killer robots'

Elon Musk en andere CEO's vragen VN-verbod voor 'killer robots' | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Een honderdtal CEO's van bedrijven gespecialiseerd in robotica en artificiële intelligentie, onder wie miljardair Elon Musk, hebben in een open brief aan de Verenigde Naties gewaarschuwd voor de gevaren van autonome wapens, beter gekend als 'killer robots'. Ze roepen op tot een internationaal verbod op dergelijke wapens.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

6 ways to make sure AI creates jobs for all and not the few

6 ways to make sure AI creates jobs for all and not the few | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Whenever I talk to people about the potential impact of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, it’s clear there is a lot of anxiety surrounding these developments.

And no wonder: these technologies already have a huge impact on the world of work, from AI-powered algorithms that recommend optimal routes to maximize Lyft and Uber drivers’ earnings; to machine learning systems that help optimize lists of customer leads so salespeople can be more effective.

We’re on the verge of tremendous transformations to work. Millions of jobs will be affected and the nature of work itself may change profoundly. We have an obligation to shape this future — the good news is that we can.

It’s easier to see the jobs that will disappear than to imagine the jobs that will be created in the future but are as yet unknown. If, as The Wall Street Journal suggests, we think of AI as a technology that predicts, it’s much easier to map its impact. We must push ourselves to do that and understand the future of work.

Here are six principles to keep in mind as we imagine how the world of work will evolve.

1. Expect massive disruption
2. AI will replace repetitive tasks more than jobs
3. Middle-skilled jobs will be hit hardest
4. Opportunities will be unequally distributed — at first
5. Technology designers have responsibility
6. The long-term trend can be positive — if we make it so.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Trudy Raymakers
Scoop.it!

The Plan to Put a 3-D Printer With Robot Arms Into Orbit

The Plan to Put a 3-D Printer With Robot Arms Into Orbit | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

SPACE IS INDIFFERENT to your suffering. It doesn’t care that it’ll freeze you to death unless you’re wearing a fancy suit, or that even before freezing you’ll suffocate in its vacuum. And it certainly doesn’t care how difficult it is for humans to get stuff done in the void: practical things like screwing in bolts and drinking water and 3-D printing replacement parts.
But a company called Made in Space is indifferent to space’s indifference. In a first, it’s showed that it can 3-D print in a thermal vacuum chamber, which simulates the nastiness of space. It’s a milestone in the outfit’s ambitious Archinaut program, which hopes to launch a 3-D printer with robot arms into orbit. You know, to build things like satellites and telescopes and stuff.
This 3-D printer works like one you'd buy for yourself, extruding layer upon layer of polymer to build a structure.

more...
No comment yet.