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Libraries are Screwed, Part 2

So we've enumerated the threats to libraries and the difficulties in finding a new formula to providing value to our communities in the absence of access to ...
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Second part of libraries are screwed. Uploaded on october 2010 very transparent and important talk.

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AI Principles - Future of Life Institute

AI Principles - Future of Life Institute | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Artificial intelligence has already provided beneficial tools that are used every day by people around the world. Its continued development, guided by the following 23 principles, will offer amazing opportunities to help and empower people in the decades and centuries ahead. 

Research Issues

1) Research Goal: The goal of AI research should be to create not undirected intelligence, but beneficial intelligence.
2) Research Funding: Investments in AI should be accompanied by funding for research on ensuring its beneficial use, including thorny questions in computer science, economics, law, ethics, and social studies, such as:

How can we make future AI systems highly robust, so that they do what we want without malfunctioning or getting hacked?
How can we grow our prosperity through automation while maintaining people’s resources and purpose?
How can we update our legal systems to be more fair and efficient, to keep pace with AI, and to manage the risks associated with AI?
What set of values should AI be aligned with, and what legal and ethical status should it have?
3) Science-Policy Link: There should be constructive and healthy exchange between AI researchers and policy-makers.

4) Research Culture: A culture of cooperation, trust, and transparency should be fostered among researchers and developers of AI.

5) Race Avoidance: Teams developing AI systems should actively cooperate to avoid corner-cutting on safety standard.


Read the other 18 principles

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Brain scanners allow scientists to 'read minds' – could they now enable a 'Big Brother' future?

Brain scanners allow scientists to 'read minds' – could they now enable a 'Big Brother' future? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Are you lying? Do you have a racial bias? Is your moral compass intact? To find out what you think or feel, we usually have to take your word for it. But questionnaires and other explicit measures to reveal what’s on your mind are imperfect: you may choose to hide your true beliefs or you may not even be aware of them.

But now there is a technology that enables us to “read the mind” with growing accuracy: functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). It measures brain activity indirectly by tracking changes in blood flow – making it possible for neuroscientists to observe the brain in action. Because the technology is safe and effective, fMRI has revolutionised our understanding of the human brain. It has shed light on areas important for speech, movement, memory and many other processes.
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I’ll never bring my phone on an international flight again. Neither should you.

I’ll never bring my phone on an international flight again. Neither should you. | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

A few months ago I wrote about how you can encrypt your entire life in less than an hour. Well, all the security in the world can’t save you if someone has physical possession of your phone or laptop…

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How Robots Helped Create 100,000 Jobs at Amazon

How Robots Helped Create 100,000 Jobs at Amazon | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Accelerating technology has been creating a lot of worry over job loss to automation, especially as machines become capable of doing things they never could in the past. A recent report released by the McKinsey Global Institute estimated that 49 percent of job activities could currently be fully automated—that equates to 1.1 billion workers globally.

What gets less buzz is the other side of the coin: automation helping to create jobs. Believe it or not, it does happen, and we can look at one of the world’s largest retailers to see that.

Thanks in part to more robots in its fulfillment centers, Amazon has been able to drive down shipping costs and pass those savings on to customers. Cheaper shipping made more people use Amazon, and the company hired more workers to meet this increased demand

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Google is teaching its AI to turn on each other

Google is teaching its AI to turn on each other | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence is slowly creeping into our daily lives, and soon, it will become necessary to understand how different agents behave in social dilemmas.

To see what would happen in such a scenario, Google's DeepMind researchers developed two games known as ‘Gathering’ and ‘Wolfpack,’ which build off the Prisoner’s Dilemma from game theory.

Over time, the AI agents learned how to behave rationally – and while they showed the researchers that they would sometimes cooperate, the games revealed the AI would turn on others when necessary.

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11 New Jobs in the Future of Healthcare and Medicine – Part II. - The Medical Futurist

11 New Jobs in the Future of Healthcare and Medicine – Part II. - The Medical Futurist | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

As I am certain that the huge waves of technological change transform the medical professional palette; based on the current and prospective trends in digital health technologies I envisioned what potential new professions could appear in our lives. Don’t miss the first part of the list!

If you have an idea about another new job of the future, please let me know and I will keep on improving the list.

1) No one knows what disease are you suffering from? Ask a healthcare navigator!
2) Healing will be joy and fun with gamification specialists
3) Augmented/virtual reality operation planners for the success of every surgical intervention
4) Reducing suffering and alleviating pain through professionally designed VR therapies
5) With the rise of nanosolutions, nanomedical engineers will be in huge demand
6) Do you have trouble with sending data from your home sensors to your smartphone? Ask an internet of healthy things connector!
7) Do you have trouble in getting from A to B in the healthcare jungle? Hire a patient assistant!
8) End-of-life therapists will prepare patients for death
9) Does your cyborg neighbor complain constantly about his life? Send him to a cyborg therapist!
10) Health data analysts wanted for making sense of big data!
11) People with paralysis will get help from brain-computer interface designers!

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The Next Big Blue-Collar Job Is Coding

The Next Big Blue-Collar Job Is Coding | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
WHEN I ASK people to picture a coder, they usually imagine someone like Mark Zuckerberg: a hoodied college dropout who builds an app in a feverish 72-hour programming jag—with the goal of getting insanely rich and, as they say, “changing the world.”

But this Silicon Valley stereotype isn’t even geographically accurate. The Valley employs only 8 percent of the nation’s coders. All the other millions? They’re more like Devon, a programmer I met who helps maintain a ­security-software service in Portland, Oregon. He isn’t going to get fabulously rich, but his job is stable and rewarding: It’s 40 hours a week, well paid, and intellectually challenging. “My dad was a blue-­collar guy,” he tells me—and in many ways, Devon is too.
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Jose Luis Yañez's curator insight, Today, 5:36 AM
The Next Big Blue-Collar Job Is Coding
 
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World's eight richest people have same wealth as poorest 50%

World's eight richest people have same wealth as poorest 50% | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The World Economic Forum (WEF) said last week that rising inequality and social polarisation posed two of the biggest risks to the global economy in 2017 and could result in the rolling back of globalisation.

Oxfam said the world’s poorest 50% owned the same in assets as the $426bn owned by a group headed by Gates, Amancio Ortega, the founder of the Spanish fashion chain Zara, and Warren Buffett, the renowned investor and chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway.

The others are Carlos Slim Helú: the Mexican telecoms tycoon and owner of conglomerate Grupo Carso; Jeff Bezos: the founder of Amazon; Mark Zuckerberg: the founder of Facebook; Larry Ellison, chief executive of US tech firm Oracle; and Michael Bloomberg; a former mayor of New York and founder and owner of the Bloomberg news and financial information service.
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trendwatching.com: 5 Trends for 2017

trendwatching.com: 5 Trends for 2017 | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Get ready. 5 big trends for 2017. Featuring Google, Starbucks, Abba (yes, really!) and more. Source: trendwatching.com | 5 Trends for 2017 | TrendWatching

Via Fred Zimny
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CES 2017: Health meets mobility - JWT Intelligence

CES 2017: Health meets mobility - JWT Intelligence | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Auto companies at CES explored how emerging tech could boost drivers’ health.
Only a few years ago, wearable health trackers were a buzzworthy novelty at CES, and before long you could hardly turn a corner on the show floor without tripping over a treadmill demonstration. More recently, with the looming prospect of autonomous driving, the prevalence of auto brands at CES has led some to jokingly dub it the “Car Excitement Show.”

In 2017, the two trends are meeting, as auto brands are floating concepts that link cars with health. Hyundai has partnered with human-centric design firm IDEO on a multisensory vision for mood enhancement behind the wheel. Meanwhile, Mercedes-Benz has organized its showing this year under the banner of “Fit&Healthy”, including “a vision of how society’s increasing health consciousness can be intelligently combined with future mobility.”
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What Happens When Algorithms Design a Concert Hall? The Stunning Elbphilharmonie

What Happens When Algorithms Design a Concert Hall? The Stunning Elbphilharmonie | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
THE MOST INTERESTING thing about Herzog and De Meuron’s newly opened concert hall, the Elbphilharmonie, isn’t its wave-like facade, which rises above the city of Hamburg, Germany. It’s not the gently curved elevator at the base of the lobby that deposits you into the belly of the Swiss architects’ alien landscape. And it’s not the Escher-esque stairways that guide you from one floor to the next.

Though Hamburg’s $843 million philharmonic is filled with stunning architectural gems, its most interesting feature is the central auditorium, a gleaming ivory cave built from 10,000 unique acoustic panels that line the ceiling, walls, and balustrades. The room looks almost organic—like a rippling, monochromatic coral reef—but bringing it to life was a technological feat.

The auditorium—the largest of three concert halls in the Elbphilharmonie—is a product of parametric design, a process by which designers use algorithms to develop an object’s form.
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AI and the Next Industrial Revolution - SERIOUS WONDER

AI and the Next Industrial Revolution - SERIOUS WONDER | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

The actual path of a raindrop as it goes down the valley is unpredictable, but the general direction is inevitable,” says digital visionary Kevin Kelly — and technology is much the same, driven by patterns that are surprising but inevitable. Over the next 20 years, he says, our penchant for making things smarter and smarter will have a profound impact on nearly everything we do. Kelly explores three trends in AI we need to understand in order to embrace it and steer its development. “The most popular AI product 20 years from now that everyone uses has not been invented yet,” Kelly says. That means that you’re not late.

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The self-driving utopia we almost had

The self-driving utopia we almost had | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Half a century after its heyday, the Alden StaRRcar clearly wasn’t made for its world. It looks like a white flatiron with wheels or a sleek, plastic bullet, dwarfed by the regal sedans o
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When Will Augmented Reality Get Real?

When Will Augmented Reality Get Real? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Augmented reality, or AR, is technology that blends virtual content with real-world surroundings. Unlike virtual reality, which immerses you in a self-contained digital world, AR overlays 3D graphics and interactive characters into your everyday world.

In the hit game Pokémon Go, players use their smartphones to catch Pokémon characters in the local park or at the office. Released in July 2016, the game was downloaded faster than any mobile app in history and generated nearly $1 billion in revenue in its first six months.

Yet despite Pokémon Go's huge numbers, when surveyors asked average Americans what they thought about augmented reality, the majority of people didn't have a clue. In a ReportLinker survey conducted last September — the same month that Pokémon Go downloads topped 500 million — 58 percent of Americans said they were "not at all familiar with" augmented reality. Awareness was slightly higher among famously connected millennials.

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Elon Musk thinks humans need to become cyborgs or risk irrelevance

Elon Musk thinks humans need to become cyborgs or risk irrelevance | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Human beings are in danger of being eclipsed by artificial intelligence and need to evolve the ability to communicate directly with machines or risk irrelevance, Elon Musk said in a typically heartwarming speech from everyone’s favorite billionaire technologist.

“Over time I think we will probably see a closer merger of biological intelligence and digital intelligence," Musk told an audience at the World Government Summit in Dubai, where he also launched Tesla in the United Arab Emirates, according to CNBC. "It's mostly about the bandwidth, the speed of the connection between your brain and the digital version of yourself, particularly output.
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The moral dilemmas of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

The moral dilemmas of the Fourth Industrial Revolution | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Should your driverless car value your life over a pedestrian's? Should your Fitbit activity be used against you in a court case? Should we allow drones to become the new paparazzi? Can one patent a human gene?

Scientists are already struggling with such dilemmas. As we enter the new machine age, we need a new set of codified morals to become the global norm. We should put as much emphasis on ethics as we put on fashionable terms like disruption.

This is starting to happen. Last year, America's Carnegie Mellon University announced a new centre studying the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence; under President Obama, the White House published a paper on the same topic; and tech giants including Facebook and Google have announced a partnership to draw up an ethical framework for AI. Both the risks and the opportunities are vast: Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk and other experts signed an open letter calling for efforts to ensure AI is beneficial to society:

"The potential benefits are huge, since everything that civilization has to offer is a product of human intelligence; we cannot predict what we might achieve when this intelligence is magnified by the tools AI may provide, but the eradication of disease and poverty are not unfathomable. Because of the great potential of AI, it is important to research how to reap its benefits while avoiding potential pitfalls.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 13, 4:12 PM
Ethics are lived out in the real world, rather than as abstract propositions. Kwame Appiah has written about ethics and legal moralism.
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The AI Threat Isn’t Skynet. It’s the End of the Middle Class

The AI Threat Isn’t Skynet. It’s the End of the Middle Class | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

.IN FEBRUARY 1975, a group of geneticists gathered in a tiny town on the central coast of California to decide if their work would bring about the end of the world. These researchers were just beginning to explore the science of genetic engineering, manipulating DNA to create organisms that didn’t exist in nature, and they were unsure how these techniques would affect the health of the planet and its people. So, they descended on a coastal retreat called Asilomar, a name that became synonymous with the guidelines they laid down at this meeting—a strict ethical framework meant to ensure that biotechnology didn’t unleash the apocalypse.

Forty-two years on, another group of scientists gathered at Asilomar to consider a similar problem. But this time, the threat wasn’t biological. It was digital. In January, the world’s top artificial intelligence researchers walked down the same beachside paths as they discussed their rapidly accelerating field and the role it will play in the fate of humanity. It was a private conference—the enormity of the subject deserves some privacy—but in recent days, organizers released several videos from the conference talks, and some participants have been willing to discuss their experience, shedding some light on the way AI researchers view the threat of their own field.

The rise of driverless cars and trucks is just a start. It’s not just blue-collar jobs that AI endangers.
Yes, they discussed the possibility of a superintelligence that could somehow escape human control, and at the end of the month, the conference organizers unveiled a set of guidelines, signed by attendees and other AI luminaries, that aim to prevent this possible dystopia. But the researchers at Asilomar were also concerned with more immediate matters: the effect of AI on the economy

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Haptic ads - JWT Intelligence

Haptic ads - JWT Intelligence | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Touch technologies are adding a new dimension to mobile advertising.

As media consumption moves to mobile devices and brands seek any edge to stand out on small screens, haptic technologies, which communicate with users using the sensation of touch, are getting renewed attention.

Haptics technology has existed for years in various forms, but is quickly gaining ground in the consumer electronics industry. A 2016 market report by Technavio estimates that the haptics technology market in consumer electronics will grow at a CAGR of 21.1% from 2014 through 2019. Meanwhile, a new study by IPG Mediabrands and Immersion Corporation has quantified the effects of haptics on consumer perceptions of advertising.
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Will Algorithms Erode Our Decision-Making Skills?

Will Algorithms Erode Our Decision-Making Skills? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The advancement of algorithms may result in the loss of human judgment, a new report says. Experts on the subject weigh the pros and cons of computer code that aims to make our lives easier.
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The Technological Future of Surgery - The Medical Futurist

The Technological Future of Surgery - The Medical Futurist | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The future of surgery offers an amazing cooperation between humans and technology, through which surgeries reach high levels of precision and efficiency.
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Aging and Death Are the Evolutionary Price of Complexity

Aging and Death Are the Evolutionary Price of Complexity | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Life’s ever-repeating cycles of birth and death are among the most fundamental principles of nature. An organism starts out as a single cell that grows and divides, develops into an embryo, matures and reaches adulthood, but then ages, deteriorates, and eventually succumbs to death.

But why does life have to be cyclic, and why does it have to end in senescence and death?

After all, animals like corals and marine sponges live for thousands of years and are capable of virtually infinite regeneration and cell repair. Even in more complex animals, offspring do not inherit their parents’ age: every new generation starts with cells in a pristine state, with no trace of aging. If senescence is somehow suppressed in reproductive cells, why do the rest of the organism’s tissues end up deteriorating and dying?
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The End of Conventional Industry Sectors

The End of Conventional Industry Sectors | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
These days, few people expect to work for a single company throughout their career. But what about the expectation that companies will remain in one industry forever? Is that, too, becoming an artifact of the past?

In a new PwC report called “The Future of Industries: Bringing Down the Walls,” we look at how the boundaries among sectors are shifting. The pace of technological change is creating at least the prospect of a new industrial order, in which most companies no longer operate within the comfort zones of their established sectors. Already, a few companies (Apple, Amazon, and GE, among them) have boldly and successfully moved into new industries. Now just about every other company will have to do business that way.

Consider the telecommunications and automobile industries. Until the past few years, a telecom company based its business primarily on routing calls and data. But now, almost 25 years after the launch of the World Wide Web, telecom companies have become entertainment content companies. Technological change has taken them across industry borders.
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The Future 100 - JWT Intelligence

The Future 100 - JWT Intelligence | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The Future 100 takes a snapshot of emerging trends for 2017, spanning culture, tech and innovation, travel and hospitality, brands and marketing, food and drink, beauty, retail, health, lifestyle, and luxury.

As we look ahead to 2017, markets are confident, even though assumptions have been questioned and narratives overturned. Amid the massive shifts that are sure to follow, there’s never been a more important time for brands to keep tabs on forecasts and emerging consumer behaviors.
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Omidyar, Hoffman create $27M research fund for AI in the public interest

Omidyar, Hoffman create $27M research fund for AI in the public interest | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
eBay founder Pierre Omidyar and LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman are among the backers of a new $27 million fund, announced today, that’s aiming to promote research into artificial intelligence in the public interest.

Concern about the societal impact of AI is rising up political agendas as it becomes clearer how much power autonomous technologies have to shape behavior and outcomes at scale. Witness, for example, the furore around Facebook and algorithmically promoted fake news in the wake of the US presidential election result.

Last month the IEEE technical professional association put out a first draft guide aiming to foster the development of ethically designed AI systems. The political establishment has also been paying more attention to the implications of rising use of autonomous systems.
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Why machine learning will decide which IoT ‘things’ survive

Why machine learning will decide which IoT ‘things’ survive | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
No billion-dollar machine could replace a doctor. But a $25 machine can tell you when you need one.

In 1996, the ER at Cook County Hospital of Chicago used an algorithm to determine when a patient with chest pain was in danger of having a heart attack and was thus worth one of its scarce hospital beds. Using a systematic, flowchart-based approach of basic tests, the algorithm proved not only to be quick and efficient, but accurate: It sorted 70 percent more patients into the low-risk category, but caught a higher percentage of heart attacks (95 percent) than human doctors (75-89 percent). And this was before any deep computing was involved.
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