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Nassim Taleb: my rules for life

Nassim Taleb: my rules for life | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The controversial thinker who predicted the 2008 financial crisis hates bankers, academics and journalists.
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MIT’s Daniela Rus is leading a robotics revolution

MIT’s Daniela Rus is leading a robotics revolution | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Daniela Rus’s morning is packed. My arrival appears to come as a bit of a surprise, as she readies herself to enter the gauntlet of wall-to-wall meetings. She considers the situation for a moment before inviting me into her office, where a group of students are already patiently waiting to talk self-driving cars. “You can’t report about any of the findings,” Rus says with a smile. “But you can come in.”

Rus has allowed me to sit in for a packed morning of team meetings. It’s a generous gesture, but more to the point, it’s the only way to manage some face-to-face time with the head of MIT’s groundbreaking Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Library (otherwise known as CSAIL). It’s a non-stop job, heading up the largest lab on MIT’s Cambridge, Massachusetts campus and, from the looks of it, Rus never rests. “There’s no time for an interview,” she explains, as we settle into the meeting. “Maybe during lunch.”

Inside the office, a half-dozen students are seated in a circle around a coffee table. There’s an award of some kind and an upside-down, 3D-printed robot with six legs standing up straight in the air — though both have mostly disappeared beneath piles of paperwork. 

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The sixth mass genesis? New species are coming into existence faster than ever thanks to humans

The sixth mass genesis? New species are coming into existence faster than ever thanks to humans | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Animals and plants are seemingly disappearing faster than at any time since the dinosaurs died out, 66m years ago. The death knell tolls for life on Earth. Rhinos will soon be gone unless we defend them, Mexico’s final few Vaquita porpoises are drowning in fishing nets, and in America, Franklin trees survive only in parks and gardens.

Yet the survivors are taking advantage of new opportunities created by humans. Many are spreading into new parts of the world, adapting to new conditions, and even evolving into new species. In some respects, diversity is actually increasing in the human epoch, the Anthropocene. It is these biological gains that I contemplate in a new book, Inheritors of the Earth: How Nature is Thriving in and Age of Extinction, in which I argue that it is no longer credible for us to take a loss-only view of the world’s biodiversity.
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What jobs will still be around in 20 years? Read this to prepare your future

What jobs will still be around in 20 years? Read this to prepare your future | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Jobs won’t entirely disappear; many will simply be redefined. But people will likely lack new skillsets required for new roles and be out of work anyway


The least safe jobs 

Telemarketer Chance of automation 99% 

Loan officer Chance of automation 98% 

Cashier Chance of automation 97% 

Paralegal and legal assistant Chance of automation 94% 

Taxi driver Chance of automation 89% 

Fast food cook Chance of automation 81%


The safest jobs 

Mental health and substance abuse social worker Chance of automation 0.3% 

Occupational therapist Chance of automation 0.35% 

Dietitian and nutritionist Chance of automation 0.39% 

Physician and surgeon Chance of automation 0.42% C

lergy Chance of automation 0.81%

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How A.I. Exoskeletons Could Make People Super-Human

How A.I. Exoskeletons Could Make People Super-Human | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

 Carnegie Mellon researchers are using machine learning algorithms in robotic exoskeletons that offer torque and force assistance based on individual needs.

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Brain interfaces open up a whole new way to get hacked

Brain interfaces open up a whole new way to get hacked | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Malicious software could use brain interfaces to help steal passwords and other private data. The Epoc+ is an $800 brain-wave-sensing headset marketed as being able to detect emotional states such as frustration or excitement, and permit you to control robots with your thoughts.

Nitesh Saxena, an associate professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has shown that it can also help software guess PINs and passwords by monitoring a person’s brain waves. The study joins a small but growing body of evidence on brain-interface security that researchers say shows even the limited headsets available today need better security.

“I would say it’s a risk for today’s devices, and with more advanced devices much more could be done in future,” says Saxena, of the prospects for private data being stolen with a brain interface. “People need to think though the privacy and security models of these interfaces.” Facebook and a new startup from Elon Musk are among those working on more advanced brain interfaces that would come with greater security risks (see “With Neuralink, Elon Musk Promises Human-to-Human Telepathy. Don’t Believe It”).


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What Happens When Cyborg Tech Goes Beyond Medicine?

What Happens When Cyborg Tech Goes Beyond Medicine? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
The age of the cyborg may be closer than we think. Rapidly improving medical robotics, wearables, and implants means many humans are already part machine, and this trend is only likely to continue. It is most noticeable in the field of medical prosthetics where high-performance titanium and carbon fiber replacements for limbs have become commonplace. …
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The Fourth Industrial Revolution Is Here: What Now? [Video]

The Fourth Industrial Revolution Is Here: What Now? [Video] | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
What if the world we knew was subtly being replaced with a new one? Would we notice immediately, or would it only be evident in hindsight?

According to the World Economic Forum, the “Fourth Industrial Revolution” is here. It’s a change as significant as any modern revolution before it. And if we look, we’ll see the signs.

If the first three industrial revolutions brought us the steam engine, electricity, and global communication, the fourth revolution merges the digital, physical and biological. As Ray Kurzweil often says, this trajectory will eventually eliminate the barriers between man and machine. 

"One of the features of this fourth industrial revolution is that it doesn't change what we are doing, but it changes us," says Klaus Schwab, founder and executive chairman of the World Economic Forum.
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Get Ready for Skyscrapers Made of Wood. (Yes, Wood)

Get Ready for Skyscrapers Made of Wood. (Yes, Wood) | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
WHEN CHICAGO’S JOHN Hancock Center was built in 1965, it required 5 million pounds of aluminum, roughly enough metal to manufacture the equivalent of 96 tour buses. Five years later, engineers did Hancock one better when they constructed the Sears Tower, a 1,400 foot skyscraper that used more than 176 million pounds of steel. Chicago has always been a city defined by metal and concrete, but now, an ambitious new proposal promises to introduce a new material to Chicago’s skyline, and to skyscrapers around the world: wood.
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Nike's moonshot, facial payments and more - JWT Intelligence

Nike's moonshot, facial payments and more - JWT Intelligence | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Spray-on touchscreens, Mental Health Month, the rise and fall of influencer marketing.

–Adweek goes inside Nike’s “moonshot” attempt to crack the two-hour marathon record; while unsuccessful, the ambitious stunt helped establish Nike’s “athletic cred.”

–MIT Technology Review highlights Face++, a Chinese face-detecting startup that can now authorize payments, as one of its ten breakthrough technologies.

–A new conductive system from Carnegie Mellon called Electrick can be sprayed on any surface, adding a touchscreen to everyday objects. Via the Verge.

–For Mental Health Month, Instagram is building communities to raise “awareness about mental health and the importance of finding support.” Via Fortune.
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Our Machines Now Have Knowledge We’ll Never Understand

Our Machines Now Have Knowledge We’ll Never Understand | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence is making the limits of human knowledge painfully obvious
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Johnson & Johnson Wants to Use 3D Printing to Heal Broken Bones

Johnson & Johnson Wants to Use 3D Printing to Heal Broken Bones | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

.The bone health-focused J&J unit has snapped up 3D printing tech from Tissue Regeneration Systems, Inc. (TRS). The platform is able to create implantable bone-like structures that have a special type of coating that helps the body absorb them and use them to help heal injuries and deformities. It can be used in bones throughout the body, including the face and skull. J&J didn't disclose the financial details for the deal

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Tech Made Cities Too Expensive. Here’s How to Fix It

Tech Made Cities Too Expensive. Here’s How to Fix It | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

IN 2013 PROTESTS broke out in Oakland, California, directed against the private buses that shuttle tech workers from pricey homes in the city’s gentrifying areas to jobs in Silicon Valley. “You live your comfortable lives,” read a flyer that protesters handed out to passengers, “surrounded by poverty, homelessness, and death, seemingly oblivious to everything around you, lost in the big bucks and success.”

That moment of backlash was an outgrowth of what I call the New Urban Crisis: the decline of middle-class neighborhoods, the gentrification of the downtowns of certain cities, and the reshaping of America’s metropolitan regions into islands of advantage surrounded by larger swaths of disadvantage.

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We're Entering A New Era of Mass Collaboration

In a networked world, the best way to become a dominant player is to be an indispensable partner
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Are Humans Getting Smarter or Less Intelligent?

Are Humans Getting Smarter or Less Intelligent? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

Observe the behavior of shoppers in a long supermarket line or drivers snarled in traffic, and you can quickly become disillusioned about humanity and its collective IQ. Reality TV and websites like People of Walmart inflame this consideration. Lots of songs, both popular and underground, even utter the phrase “only stupid people are breeding.” Apparently, many of us can relate.

And yet, we’re better at technology today than in times past. Never before have we been more productive, better educated, or more technologically savvy. I had a teacher in high school who said that at the time Einstein was considering relativity, few people in the entire world were intelligent enough to understand it. But just a generation later, everyone had the theory in high school and understood it well, or at least well enough to pass the test.

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Ray Kurzweil: Here's What Will Happen When We Connect Our Brains to the Cloud

Ray Kurzweil: Here's What Will Happen When We Connect Our Brains to the Cloud | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Ray Kurzweil is an inventor, thinker, and futurist famous for forecasting the pace of technology and predicting the world of tomorrow. In this video, Kurzweil looks ahead to a time in the not-too-distant future when we’ll be able to connect our brains to computers in the cloud. Individual computers and mobile devices are already billions …
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Forget the Blood of Teens. This Pill Promises to Extend Life for a Nickel a Pop.

Forget the Blood of Teens. This Pill Promises to Extend Life for a Nickel a Pop. | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
NIR BARZILAI HAS a plan. It’s a really big plan that might one day change medicine and health care as we know it. Its promise: extending our years of healthy, disease-free living by decades.
And Barzilai knows about the science of aging. He is, after all, the director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. And, as such, he usually talks about his plan with the caution of a seasoned researcher. Usually. Truth is, Barzilai is known among his colleagues for his excitability—one author says he could pass as the older brother of Austin Powers—and sometimes he can’t help himself. Like the time he referred to his plan—which, among other things, would demonstrate that human aging can be slowed with a cheap pill—as “history-making.” In 2015, he stood outside of the offices of the Federal Drug Administration, flanked by a number of distinguished researchers on aging, and likened the plan to a journey to “the promised land.”
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These 7 Disruptive Technologies Could Be Worth Trillions of Dollars

These 7 Disruptive Technologies Could Be Worth Trillions of Dollars | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Scientists, technologists, engineers, and visionaries are building the future. Amazing things are in the pipeline. It’s a big deal. But you already knew all that. Such speculation is common. What’s less common? Scale. How big is big? “Silicon Valley, Silicon Alley, Silicon Dock, all of the Silicons around the world, they are dreaming the dream. …
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What is Bitcoin?

What is Bitcoin? | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

In 2010, financial history was made when someone bought a pizza. If you haven’t heard about this groundbreaking event, don’t worry, you're not the only one.

The pizza wasn’t the important part of the transaction - it was what was used to pay for it. The meal cost 10,000 bitcoins and was the first time the virtual currency was used to buy something in the real world. The day is now celebrated every year by bitcoin enthusiasts as Bitcoin Pizza Day.

Things have come a long way since then. Bitcoin’s use and value have soared. If that diner had held onto those 10,000 bitcoins they may not have made history, but they would be around $20 million better off today.

In March this year, the price of one bitcoin climbed above the price of one ounce of gold for the first time.

Bitcoin’s increasing value is due to the fact that its popularity has rocketed in recent years. In 2009, there were fewer than 10,000 transactions in bitcoin. By January this year that number had trebled. Analysts put this down to the fact that investors think it will hold its value better than some other investments, as well as the fact that it has become increasingly popular in Asia.

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Extreme facial recognition technology: the end of hide-and-seek - Richard van Hooijdonk

Extreme facial recognition technology: the end of hide-and-seek - Richard van Hooijdonk | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
Digital Democracy makes you ‘a fly on the wall’ at the state house
Facial recognition body cameras turn police officers into mobile surveillance systems
With facial recognition software, diagnosing genetic disease is as quick as taking a photo
Fighting thieves with new-age mug shots
No more hide-and-seek
Remember that moment when you saw someone on the street and were sure you’d seen their face before? You searched your memory and then suddenly you got it — you remembered her from your trip to the grocery store the previous week. The biological process of facial recognition led you to this conclusion. Each person has distinctive facial features: their eye shape, or maybe a big forehead or a pointy nose, and we use these features to differentiate between people at a glance.

Nodal points – those features we don’t immediately recognise
However, there are some delicate characteristics that we’re not able to recognise immediately, things like the distance between a person’s eyes, the depth of their eye sockets, or the length of their jaw. These are known as nodal points, and researchers suggest that each face has approximately eighty of them. We’re not able to process those features because we look at the face as a whole, but they’re a distinctive marker of identity. ”Facial recognition software is already quite accurate in measuring unchanging and unique ratios between facial features that identify you as you,” Jan Chipchase, a facial recognition researcher insists. “It’s like a fingerprint.”
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Digital treatments can be real medicine

Digital treatments can be real medicine | Futurewaves | Scoop.it


What if an app could replace a pill? That’s the big question behind an emerging trend known as “digital therapeutics.” The idea: software that can improve a person’s health as much as a drug can, but without the same cost and side-effects.

Digital therapeutics, or “digiceuticals,” as some call them, have become a Holy Grail in some quarters of Silicon Valley, where investors see the chance to deliver medicine through your smartphone. Andreessen Horowitz, the venture firm, even predicts digital drugs will become “the third phase” of medicine, meaning the successor to the chemical and protein drugs we have now, but without the billion-dollar cost of bringing one to market.  

“It’s going to seem backwards and even barbaric that our solution to everything was just giving out pills,” partner Vijay Pande wrote on the investment company’s blog.

But defining exactly what a digital therapeutic actually is can be as elusive as finding the famous chalice. “It’s still a fluid space that everyone is trying to categorize,” says Peter Hames, the British CEO of a startup called Big Health, which offers an online therapy program for insomnia suffers called sleep.io that it claims can replace “pills or potions” with visualization exercises.

Hames says digital therapies fall into two groups, which he calls “medication augmentation” and “medication replacement.” He says sleep.io is in the latter category because it actually makes sleeping pills unnecessary. “We’ve been able to show through multiple peer-reviewed studies that the outcomes are better than drugs,” he says.

The term digital therapeutics began to circulate around 2013, in large part due to Sean Duffy, CEO of Omada Health. He began using it at conferences and in the company’s marketing materials to describe its online coaching software to help pre-diabetics avoid getting sick by exercising more and losing weight.

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Google’s 3 Secrets To Designing Perfect Conversations

Google’s 3 Secrets To Designing Perfect Conversations | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

We’ve all been frustrated when talking to a computer. Maybe it can’t understand what you’re saying. Maybe it hears you, but doesn’t understand what you mean. Or maybe it’s just a tedious chat with a cloying personality with whom you’d never choose to associate in real life.

Such are the problems of designing voice interfaces. In theory, voice is the ultimate medium–one people don’t have to learn to use. “Users are instant experts. There’s nothing to teach, or at least there shouldn’t be,” says Daniel Padgett, conversational design lead at Google. “It’s something that they’ve been doing forever. Because of that, they have high expectations.”

However, the fact that human speech is so nuanced and contextually driven makes a serious challenge for any designer or company looking to break into this new medium. And voice interfaces aren’t just for companies like Google, Microsoft, Amazon, and Apple anymore. Now that more and more businesses actually build their own chatbots for shopping and customer support, it’s a skill more companies need to learn.

At Google’s big I/O conference last week, conversational experts from across the company gave half a dozen different talks about the best practices of designing dialogs between people and computers. We listened in–and compiled the best bits into three overarching tips.



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Meet the People Who Train the Robots (to Do Their Own Jobs)

Meet the People Who Train the Robots (to Do Their Own Jobs) | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO — What if part of your job became teaching a computer everything you know about doing someone’s job — perhaps your own?

Before the machines become smart enough to replace humans, as some people fear, the machines need teachers. Now, some companies are taking the first steps, deploying artificial intelligence in the workplace and asking their employees to train the A.I. to be more human.

We spoke with five people — a travel agent, a robotics expert, an engineer, a customer-service representative and a scriptwriter, of sorts — who have been put in this remarkable position. More than most, they understand the strengths (and weaknesses) of artificial intelligence and how the technology is changing the nature of work.

Here are their stories.
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What Has Digital Health Ever Done For Us? Well, At Least 60 Things! - The Medical Futurist

What Has Digital Health Ever Done For Us? Well, At Least 60 Things! - The Medical Futurist | Futurewaves | Scoop.it

I get a lot of questions after my keynotes and online either from patients or physicians about what digital health has ever done for us. They ask this as if digital health was non-existent or not useful. As if medicine should be practiced and healthcare should be delivered like it has been for hundreds of years. While we need to preserve real values such as the human touch and the creativity of physicians, the future will be and must be technological and digital.

The era of technological advances we live in brought new opportunities for improving care; and digital health is the essence of the transition. So instead of a long philosophical essay about why digital health is the only way to go, I give you 60 responses to the pressing question: what digital health has ever done for us.

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Algorithm predicts epileptic seizures in real-time - Futurity

Algorithm predicts epileptic seizures in real-time - Futurity | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
A new system could detect seizures in patients with epilepsy before they happen—and potentially stop them in advance.
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Next List 2017: 20 Tech Visionaries You Should Have Heard of by Now

Next List 2017: 20 Tech Visionaries You Should Have Heard of by Now | Futurewaves | Scoop.it
MICROSOFT WILL BUILD computers even more sleek and beautiful than Apple’s. Robots will 3-D-print cool shoes that are personalized just for you. (And you’ll get them in just a few short days.) Neural networks will take over medical diagnostics, and Snapchat will try to take over the entire world. The women and men in these pages are the technical, creative, idealistic visionaries who are bringing the future to your doorstep. You might not recognize their names—they’re too busy working to court the spotlight—but you’ll soon hear about them a lot. They represent the best of what’s next.
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