Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Mind Wandering Is More Than Just A Fault In The System

Mind Wandering Is More Than Just A Fault In The System | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and the University of York in England have shown that involuntary and intentional mind wandering can be dissociated based on brain structure and function, building on prior studies that demonstrate behavioral and psychological differences. “We found that in people who often purposefully allow their minds to go off on a tangent the cortex is thicker in some prefrontal regions”, says Johannes Golchert, PhD student at the Max Planck Institute in Leipzig and first author of the study. “Furthermore, we found that in people who intentionally mind wander, two main brain networks broadly overlap each other: the default-mode network, which is active when focusing on information from memory, and the fronto-parietal network, which stabilizes our focus and inhibits irrelevant stimuli as part of our cognitive control system.”
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Maladaptive daydreaming - Wikipedia

Maladaptive daydreaming - Wikipedia

But most psychologists have never heard of maladaptive daydreaming, and it is not officially recognized as a disorder. Many scoff at the idea that a normal activity like fantasizing could cause such distress. So how can people who believe their daydreaming is out of control receive help?

Maladaptive daydreaming or excessive daydreaming is a psychological concept first introduced by Eli Somer[1] to describe an extensive fantasy activity that replaces human interaction and/or interferes with academic, interpersonal, or vocational functioning.

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Does a sweet tooth affect sugar intake?

Does a sweet tooth affect sugar intake? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It has long been known taste plays an important role in many of our food choices, but what if we knew whether having a so-called "sweet tooth" did indeed lead to a sugar habit?
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You'll Never Guess Where This FBI Agent Left a Secret Interrogation Manual | Mother Jones

You'll Never Guess Where This FBI Agent Left a Secret Interrogation Manual | Mother Jones | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
For years, the American Civil Liberties Union fought a legal battle to force the FBI to release a range of documents concerning FBI guidelines, including this one, which covers the practices agents are supposed to employ when questioning suspects. Through all this, unbeknownst to the ACLU and the FBI, the manual sat in a government archive open to the public. When the FBI finally relented and provided the ACLU a version of the interrogation guidebook last year, it was heavily redacted; entire pages were blacked out. But the version available at the Library of Congress, which a Mother Jones reporter reviewed last week, contains no redactions.

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Amazing Insects: Ants Create Chemical Cocktails to Brew Antibiotics

Amazing Insects: Ants Create Chemical Cocktails to Brew Antibiotics | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
To keep fungal pathogens at bay in their crowded homes, wood ants mix potions to create powerful protection for their nest and their young. Makes sense, right? Humans mix chemicals all the time to make medicines, household cleaners, and other health and wellness products. But wood ants (Formica paralugubris) have apparently been at it for millions of years longer than us. In a study published in Ecology and Evolution, researchers from Switzerland, at the University of Lausanne and University of Neuchâtel, discovered that wood ants not only know about the natural antibiotic properties of the
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Confabulation | Encyclopedia of Psychology

Confabulation | Encyclopedia of Psychology | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Confabulations are classified into one of two categories: provoked and spontaneous. A provoked confabulation is when a patient invents an untrue story in response to a question. These tend to be quite common among patients with amnesia or dementia. A spontaneous confabulation is a more rare occurrence and involves the telling of an untrue story with no apparent motivation.

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How the McGurk effect mixes up sights and sounds in the brain

How the McGurk effect mixes up sights and sounds in the brain | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Let's say you record a person pronouncing a couple sounds over and over again - say, "bah" and "vah", which are very similar sounds made with clearly different lip movements. Now you keep the audio of the person saying "bah" but overlay it with the video of the person saying "vah." Which sound will you hear? 


Any sane person would think you'd still hear "bah", but that isn't the case at all. The mind prioritizes the visual information over the auditory information, deciding what it sees as the correct noise - the person mouthing "vah" - trumps the ears clearly hearing the person say "bah." You can literally watch the mixed video, clearly hear the person say "vah", then close your eyes and it immediately switches back to "bah", and the only change in sounds occurred entirely in your mind. That's the McGurk effect. 


If that seems impossible to believe, check out this video demonstrating its power over our minds:

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The World's Largest 'Artificial Sun' Has Just Been Switched on in Germany

The World's Largest 'Artificial Sun' Has Just Been Switched on in Germany | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It's a bit bright in here.
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Here's Why Listening to Sad Music Makes You Feel Better

Here's Why Listening to Sad Music Makes You Feel Better | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new study sheds light on what's going on inside our brains when we match our music to our feels, and it looks like sad music can be enjoyable - rather than simply depressing - because it triggers positive memories that can help to lift our mood.

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Peru floods kill 67 and spark criticism of country's climate change preparedness

Peru floods kill 67 and spark criticism of country's climate change preparedness | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Devastating downpour, caused by high ocean temperatures, could not have been predicted, president said, months after state of emergency declared for wildfires
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How the Wave Disk Generator Works

How the Wave Disk Generator Works | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The wave disk generator propulsion system could revolutionize the way we move our vehicles. Read about what makes the wave disk generator so special.
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And I Think To Myself, What A Virtual World

And I Think To Myself, What A Virtual World | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Academia, public sector, and commercial enterprises are all looking to go
digital and virtual in one fashion or another. What does this world look
like? Expert Chuc
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This online tool makes checking crowd sizes easier

This online tool makes checking crowd sizes easier | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

This online tool makes checking crowd sizes easier – Poynter

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Dissociation (psychology) - Wikipedia

Dissociation (psychology) - Wikipedia

In psychology, dissociation is any of a wide array of experiences from mild detachment from immediate surroundings to more severe detachment from physical and emotional experience. The major characteristic of all dissociative phenomena involves a detachment from reality, rather than a loss of reality as in psychosis.

French philosopher and psychologist Pierre Janet (1859–1947) is considered to be the author of the concept of dissociation.[16] Contrary to some conceptions of dissociation, Janet did not believe that dissociation was a psychological defense.[17][18] Psychological defense mechanisms belong to Freud's theory of psychoanalysis, not to Janetian psychology. Janet claimed that dissociation occurred only in persons who had a constitutional weakness of mental functioning that led to hysteria when they were stressed. Although it is true that many of Janet's case histories described traumatic experiences, he never considered dissociation to be a defense against those experiences. Quite the opposite: Janet insisted that dissociation was a mental or cognitive deficit. Accordingly, he considered trauma to be one of many stressors that could worsen the already-impaired "mental efficiency" of a hysteric, thereby generating a cascade of hysterical (in today's language, "dissociative") symptoms.[16][19][20][21]

Although there was great interest in dissociation during the last two decades of the nineteenth century (especially in France and England), this interest rapidly waned with the coming of the new century.[16] Even Janet largely turned his attention to other matters. On the other hand, there was a sharp peak in interest in dissociation in America from 1890 to 1910, especially in Boston as reflected in the work of William James, Boris Sidis, Morton Prince, and William McDougall. Nevertheless, even in America, interest in dissociation rapidly succumbed to the surging academic interest in psychoanalysis and behaviorism. For most of the twentieth century, there was little interest in dissociation. Discussion of dissociation only resumed when Ernest Hilgard (1977) published his neodissociation theory in the 1970s and when several authors wrote about multiple personality in the 1980s.[citation needed]

Carl Jung described pathological manifestations of dissociation as special or extreme cases of the normal operation of the psyche. This structural dissociation, opposing tension, and hierarchy of basic attitudes and functions in normal individual consciousness is the basis of Jung's Psychological Types.[22] He theorized that dissociation is a natural necessity for consciousness to operate in one faculty unhampered by the demands of its opposite.

Attention to dissociation as a clinical feature has been growing in recent years as knowledge of post-traumatic stress disorder increased, due to interest in dissociative identity disorder and the multiple personality controversy, and as neuroimaging research and population studies show its relevance.[23]

Historically the psychopathological concept of dissociation has also another different root: the conceptualization of Eugen Bleuler that looks into dissociation related to schizophrenia.[24]
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Creativity will be the source of our next industrial revolution, not machines

Creativity will be the source of our next industrial revolution, not machines | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Growth in the first industrial revolution was driven by engineering, the second through electricity and production lines, and the third by technology and information. The modern economies that will undergo a fourth industrial revolution will not be those that worship machines, but those that support human creativity. When we understand how people think an
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New Guide Offers Dialogue and Guidance on Vicarious Trauma

New Guide Offers Dialogue and Guidance on Vicarious Trauma | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
MENU New Guide Offers Dialogue and Guidance on Vicarious Trauma Our third handbook is about the challenges posed by vicarious trauma, and provides practical tips and guidance to journalists, newsroom managers and universities. Journalism and Vicarious Trauma Guide Illustrations by Hannah Barrett Aimee Rinehart by: Aimee Rinehart Date: April 19, 2017 4 mins Recommend: 0 Log in to save this article Add to a pack Share: Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone Tags: best practice, guide, vicarious trauma “Twenty years ago, we’d have maybe two edits from the Hungarian border because of the cost of doing feeds, and it would have been packaged on the ground, you’d get broadcastable packages. Now everything just comes in…that filter has disappeared.” As this agency journalist explains, the amount of graphic content journalists view every day on their computers has increased substantially. Furthermore research has shown that levels of vicarious trauma in newsroom staff is also on the rise. The sheer number of images and videos shot by eyewitnesses, but also the unfiltered nature of the content, has bought the realities of the field into the newsroom. In our third handbook, “Journalism and Vicarious Trauma: A Guide for Journalists, Editors and News Organisations,” Sam Dubberley and Michele Grant have written about the challenges posed by vicarious trauma and provide practical tips and guidance. The guide is relevant for journalists at different stages of their newsroom careers as well as decision makers in the newsroom and human resources departments. The guide will also be useful for journalism professors who need to equip future journalists with the tools to cope with the new realities of the job. Journalism and Vicarious TraumaWe define vicarious trauma in the guide as exposure to distressing images and videos that can cause similar emotional responses as when someone witnesses trauma firsthand in the field. The risk of vicarious trauma is supported by research from Eyewitness Media Hub in its report, “Making Secondary Trauma a Primary Issue: A Study of Eyewitness Media and Vicarious Trauma on the Digital Frontline,” and argues that as well as geographic frontlines, we need to think about the digital frontline.
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Laennec’s Baton: A Short History of the Stethoscope

Laennec’s Baton: A Short History of the Stethoscope | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Since its invention in 1816, the stethoscope has become one of the most iconic symbols of the medical profession. Yet there was a time when doctors had to assess the inner sounds of the human body unaided. In 350 B.C., Hippocrates—the ‘Father of Medicine’—suggested gently shaking the patient by the shoulders, while applying one’s ear directly to the chest in order to determine the presence of thoracic empyema, or pus in the lungs. For over a thousand years, medical practitioners would follow in Hippocrates’s footsteps, relying on only their ears to diagnose chest infections in patients.

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Reconstructive memory: Confabulating the past, simulating the future

Reconstructive memory: Confabulating the past, simulating the future | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The term ‘Rashomon effect’ is often used by psychologists in situations where observers give different accounts of the same event,and describes the effect of subjective perceptions on recollection. The phenomenon is named after a 1950 film by the great Japanese director Akira Kurosawa. It was with Rashōmon that Western cinema-goers discovered both Kurosawa and Japanese film in general – the film won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1951, as well as the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film the following year.

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