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Phys.Org Mobile: Engineers build first nonreciprocal acoustic circulator: A one-way sound device

Phys.Org Mobile: Engineers build first nonreciprocal acoustic circulator: A one-way sound device | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
" The scientific knowledge gained from successfully building a nonreciprocal sound circulator may lead to advances in noise control, new acoustic equipment for sonars and sound communication systems, and improved compact components for acoustic imaging and sensing."
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Modular Robotics' MOSS Kit Makes Building Robots a Snap - IEEE Spectrum

Modular Robotics' MOSS Kit Makes Building Robots a Snap - IEEE Spectrum | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Anyone can build a robot with these modular parts (RT @Peter_Bowden: Modular Robotics' MOSS Kit Makes Building Robots a Snap http://t.co/CfIiEsn1by via @IEEESpectrum #robots #diy #education …)...
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SensoMotoric Instruments: Gaze and Eye Tracking Systems

SensoMotoric Instruments: Gaze and Eye Tracking Systems | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
SensoMotoric Instruments (SMI) is a world leader in hardware and software solutions for gaze and eye tracking, eye movement and eye control in psychology, neurology, usability, market research, sports, training, medicine.

 

From January 22-25, 2014, the World Leaders will gather in Davos, CH, as they have been doing each year for more than three decades. SensoMotoric Instruments (SMI; www.smivision.com) will be there to present eye tracking as a key technology which drives industry transformation – especially when used in combination with brain response data. Decision making, the related information processing and human-machine-interaction are being transformed by better understanding and real time usage of visual attention, emotions and brain information processing.

 

In a unique on-site eye tracking experiment with world leaders conducted in Davos, SMI will demonstrate how eye tracking reveals the underlying factors of information retrieval. How these insights can be used to improve decision making, inform policy-making and strategy will be explained by Olivier Oullier, professor of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at Aix-Marseille University (France) and also a Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum. He will lead the experiment all week long and, on January 23rd, he will present results from an innovative worldwide lab and on site study he conducted for the World Economic Forum and his partners. Key insights on sustainable consumption were investigated and compared across countries thanks to the unique mobility afforded by the combination of SMI Eye Tracking Glasses 2.0 (ETG) in combination with Emotiv's EPOC brain response technology.


Via Ashish Umre
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The robotic future won't look anything like what you imagine

The robotic future won't look anything like what you imagine | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
In late autumn, I walked through drifts of crunchy leaves in Berkeley's warehouse district to find a strange lab on the shores of San Francisco Bay.

Via Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Flow system overcomes reagent incompatibility issues | Chemistry World

Flow system overcomes reagent incompatibility issues | Chemistry World | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Cyclic carbonate yields are boosted by making them from alkenes and carbon dioxide in a flow reactor
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Stephen Hawking: 'There are no black holes'

Stephen Hawking: 'There are no black holes' | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Notion of an 'event horizon', from which nothing can escape, is incompatible with quantum theory, physicist claims.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "Polchinski’s team came to the startling realization that the laws of quantum mechanics, which govern particles on small scales, change the situation completely. Quantum theory, they said, dictates that the event horizon must actually be transformed into a highly energetic region, or 'firewall', that would burn the astronaut to a crisp."

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Now You Can Build Google's $1M Artificial Brain on the Cheap | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

Now You Can Build Google's $1M Artificial Brain on the Cheap | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Andrew Ng wants to bring deep learning -- an emerging computer science field that seeks to mimic the human brain with hardware and software -- into the DIY era.
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excerpt: 

“GPUs are so incredibly powerful,” says David Anderson, a computer scientist at Berkeley. “Programs that previously ran on supercomputers, we’re now realizing we can rewrite to run on GPUs at a fraction of the price.” His team at Berkeley recently rejigged the volunteer-parallel-computing platform, BOINC, to be able to run on GPUs. BOINC helps scientists analyze astronomical and biomedical data.

 
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Brains in Silicon

Brains in Silicon | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
We're emulating the brain —in silicon

Welcome to Brains in Silicon. Learn about the lab, get to know the brains that work here, and find out about new projects that you could join. 

We have crafted two complementary objectives: To use existing knowledge of brain function in designing an affordable supercomputer—one that can itself serve as a tool to investigate brain function—feeding back and contributing to a fundamental, biological understanding of how the brain works.

We model brains using an approach far more efficient than software simulation: We emulate the flow of ions directly with the flow of electrons—don't worry, on the outside it looks just like software.

Welcome and enjoy your time here!

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When nanotechnology meets quantum physics in 1 dimension

Scientists from McGill University and Sandia National Laboratories have succeeded in conducting a new experiment that supports the existence of the long-sought-after Luttinger liquid state. Their findings, published in the Jan. instructive excerpt: " Making a device with the correct parameters to conduct the experiment was no simple task, however, despite the team's 2011 discovery of a way to do so. It took years of trial, and more than 250 faulty devices – each of which required 29 processing steps – before Laroche's painstaking efforts succeeded in producing functional devices yielding reliable data. "So many things could go wrong during the fabrication process that troubleshooting the failed devices felt like educated guesswork at times," explains Laroche. "Adding in the inherent failure rate compounded at each processing step made the fabrication of these devices extremely challenging."
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33rd Square: Scientists Create Artificial Plastic Cell With Functioning Organelles

33rd Square: Scientists Create Artificial Plastic Cell With Functioning Organelles | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
For the first time, chemists have successfully produced an artificial cell containing organelles capable of carrying out the various steps of a chemical reaction.
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The Future of Drones

The Future of Drones | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
We’ve all heard of drone use in the military. But did you know that drones are being used by a wide variety of individuals and organizations right here at home every day… and that they’ll have
Sharrock's insight:

Real Estate and photographers using them for difficult shots--that's pretty cool. This is a good read. 

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Kelsey Von Berge's curator insight, March 13, 12:00 AM

Just like most public policies, drones can be good and also bad. I think drones should definitely be used for filming videos, sports and taking cool pictures that just wouldn't be able to be captured with a normal camera. On the other hand, they can be used to spy on other people which can raise a lot of controversy and confusion. 

Madisen Schimek's comment, March 16, 8:39 PM
It's all a question whether the good out weighs the bad. I think they may end up causing some serious issues but also could help a lot with the right about of regulations in place to protect the rights of the people.
Maureen Disque's comment, March 17, 3:41 PM
It's hard to tell whether or not drones are generally good or bad. I agree that drones should be used for filming and taking pictures normal cameras couldn't capture, although the use of drones for spying is a huge controversy in America.
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33rd Square: RoboEarth Project Aims To Build Cloud for Robots

33rd Square: RoboEarth Project Aims To Build Cloud for Robots | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The RoboEarth project aims to build a cloud computing platform for robotics.
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33rd Square: Synthetic Magnetic Monopole Created In the Lab

33rd Square: Synthetic Magnetic Monopole Created In the Lab | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
With a discovery that may lead to entirely new materials, such as superconductors, researchers have been able to create a magnetic monopole in the lab.
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Mass Personalization Is Coming. Are We Ready For It?

Mass Personalization Is Coming. Are We Ready For It? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
As big data opens up a new world of possibilities, we’re going to have to come to terms with what we really want. Excerpt: "technology can decipher signals that we aren’t even aware of. Mattersight is a company that has developed software that can analyze your personality during a routine customer service call. In his book, Honest Signals, MIT’s Sandy Pentland describes a machine that can predict behavior from subtle physical cues."
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Bose-Einstein Condensate Made at Room Temperature for First Time

Bose-Einstein Condensate Made at Room Temperature for First Time | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

The quantum mechanical phenomena, known as Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC), was first demonstrated in 1995 when experiments proved that the septuagenarian theory did in fact exist in the physical world. Of course, to achieve the phenomena a state of near absolute zero (-273 Celsius, -459 Fahrenheit) had to be created.

 

Now researchers at IBM’s Binnig and Rohrer Nano Center have been able to achieve the BEC at room temperature using a specially developed polymer, a laser, and some mirrors.

 

IBM believes that this experiment could potentially be used in the development of novel optoelectronic devices, including energy-efficient lasers and ultra-fast optical switches. One application for BEC is for the building of so-called atom lasers, which could have applications ranging from atomic-scale lithography to measurement and detection of gravitational fields.

 

For the first time, the IBM team achieved it at room temperature by placing a thin polymer film—only 35 nanometers thick—between two mirrors and then shining a laser into the configuration. The bosonic particles are created as the light travels through the polymer film and bounces back and forth between the two mirrors.

 

While this BEC state of matter only lasts for a few picoseconds (trillionths of a second), the IBM researchers believe that it exists long enough to create a source of laser-like light or an optical switch that could be used in optical interconnects.

 

“That BEC would be possible using a polymer film instead of the usual ultra-pure crystals defied our expectations,” said Dr. Thilo Stöferle, a physicist, at IBM Research, in a press release. “It’s really a beautiful example of quantum mechanics where one can directly see the quantum world on a macroscopic scale.”

 

Now that the researchers have managed to trigger the effect, they are now looking to gain more control over it. In the process they will be evaluating how the effect could best be exploited for a range of applications. One interesting application that will be examined is using the BEC in analog quantum simulations for such macroscopic quantum phenomena as superconductivity, which is extremely difficult to model with today’s simulation approaches.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Sweet success for bio-battery | Chemistry World

Sweet success for bio-battery | Chemistry World | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Battery running on sugar holds double the energy of conventional lithium-ion batteries and could be powering phones in a matter of years
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From Football Fans to Communist Regimes, It Doesn't Take Much to Form a Group

From Football Fans to Communist Regimes, It Doesn't Take Much to Form a Group | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Computer model suggests two simple rules drive the creation of "us”" versus "them"
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Daniel Kahneman - Interview Transcript

Daniel Kahneman - Interview Transcript | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Nobelprize.org, The Official Web Site of the Nobel Prize

 

I never think of myself as having demonstrated irrationality.  There is a definition of rationality within the contest of economic theory or decision theory more broadly, which is a completely unrealistic conception of a human agent with a complete preference order about all states of the world, with a Bayesian set of beliefs about all possible states and this defines rationality in the context of economic theory. Now as a descriptive hypothesis this is a totally implausible hypothesis and, you know, it is fairly easy to show that that hypothesis isn’t true and we’ve been doing that, my late colleague Amos Tversky and I, and many others. It’s also not particularly interesting to show that it isn’t true because it’s so easy to do. We have been able to show some of the ways in which people depart from this ideal of rationality but this is not irrationality. People are reasonable, they’re prudent agents. It’s just that the definition of rationality that is used in economic theory is, I think, a very implausible definition and it fails descriptively and we have been able to document some of these failures and explain them. 

Sharrock's insight:

There is a lot of material and thought in these interviews with Nobel Prize Winners. This may be a powerful resource to learn the powerful ideas from the developers of them because when they are interviewed in this context, they are compelled to impress and inform. 

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Big Data Brain Drain | Science Careers

Big Data Brain Drain | Science Careers | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

excerpt: ""Where scientific research is concerned, this recently accelerated shift to data-centric science has a dark side, which boils down to this: the skills required to be a successful scientific researcher are increasingly indistinguishable from the skills required to be successful in industry," VanderPlas writes. "While academia, with typical inertia, gradually shifts to accommodate this, the rest of the world has already begun to embrace and reward these skills to a much greater degree. The unfortunate result is that some of the most promising upcoming researchers are finding no place for themselves in the academic community, while the for-profit world of industry stands by with deep pockets and open arms." (Note that the emphasis is in the original.)"

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Energy Efficient Brain Simulator Outperforms Supercomputers

Energy Efficient Brain Simulator Outperforms Supercomputers | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Neurogrid is a computing platform that scientists hope will revolutionize our understanding of the brain.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "The difference is that the computations that underlie whether or not a neuron fires are driven by continuous, non-linear processes, more akin to an analog signal. Neurogrid uses an analog signal for computations, and a digital signal for communication. In doing so, it follows the samehybrid

 analog-digital approach as the brain."

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Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience

Brainlike Computers, Learning From Experience | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The new computing approach is based on the biological nervous system, specifically on how neurons react to stimuli and connect with other neurons to interpret information.
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33rd Square: Scientists Create Artificial Plastic Cell With Functioning Organelles

33rd Square: Scientists Create Artificial Plastic Cell With Functioning Organelles | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
For the first time, chemists have successfully produced an artificial cell containing organelles capable of carrying out the various steps of a chemical reaction.
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Research in Brain Function and Learning

Research in Brain Function and Learning | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Interventions
Reward good behaviors quickly and as frequently as possible. Please refer to the module on giving praise. Follow through with consequences. 
When a child breaks the established rules, warn once. If the behavior continues, follow through with the promised consequence immediately. For excessive activity Use activity as a reward. Alternate a seat-based activity with a more physical activity. For example, send the child to the office with a note for the secretary or give an activity that removes the child from the situation. Solicit active responses. Examples include talking, moving or organizing responses. Do not try to reduce physical activity. 
Encourage non-disruptive movement 
Allow students to stand while doing seatwork Positively reinforce effort as well as success. For example, tell the child how well he/she is working. Give clear, concise instructions. Have a child repeat directions to you aloud. Reinforce directions with a visual reminder when appropriate. For example, provide a list on the blackboard of what is expected and the approximate amount of time that each step should take. Allow limited choice of tasks, topics and activities. Use a child’s interest whenever possible in designing activities or introducing material. Match a child’s learning ability and preferred method of response. Allow alternate response modes (computer, taped assignments) with every assignment. Provide a predictable routine in your class. Encourage the use of color coded folders, PDAs etc. Make tasks as interesting as possible. Allow children to work with partners. Alternate high and low interest tasks. Give targeted children priority seating close to the teacher. Increase or provide novelty at later stages of the task to keep the child motivated. Decrease the length of the tasks you assign. Break up tasks into smaller parts. Have tasks arranged so that children complete smaller parts after longer parts. For every unpreferred task, engage in two preferred tasks. Let students know that this will happen. Give fewer math or spelling problems. For example, have the child do only the odd or even problems. Or put fewer problems (words on one page). Use distributed (rather than mass) practice for problems beginning a task. Increase structure and/or add emphasis to relevant parts of a task or assignment. Ask a child to repeat directions. Use written directions. Set realistic standards for acceptable work. Point out topic sentences, headings, etc. to improve task completion. Use lists and assignment organizers. Substitute verbal or motor responses for written responses. Have a child work on easier parts of a task before tackling the more difficult ones. Underline key words in directions. Allow quiet play. Encourage note taking for older children in high school. Reward short intervals of patient waiting. Don’t assume that impulsive behaviors are aggressive. Cue the child to upcoming difficult times when extra control is needed. Bring distracters or toys that are quiet and absorbing. Encourage after school activities. Develop the child’s sense of confidence and responsibility. Model good behavior. Encourage targeted children to play with children who can serve as positive role models. Reward good behavior.
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8 Unexpected Ways Technology Will Change The World By 2020

8 Unexpected Ways Technology Will Change The World By 2020 | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Six years isn't that long but the rapid pace of innovation means everything--from education to health care to the Internet itself--could look a lot...

Via Anna Hu
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Anna Hu 's curator insight, January 19, 5:32 AM

"The membrane between the online world and the offline will effectively disappear, as continuously connected devices fully disappear into our pockets, clothing, our jewelry, our selves,"

Dorai Thodla's curator insight, January 23, 10:21 PM

How do we detect some of these changes early enough to be prepared?