Science, Technolo...
Follow
Find
1.7K views | +0 today
Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
Technology/Futurism/Science/Education/SystemsThinking/
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

What Are "Nearables," And Why Is Ideo So Excited About Them?

What Are "Nearables," And Why Is Ideo So Excited About Them? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Bluetooth beacons enter a new interactive frontier with Estimote's sticker-size hardware Last week beacon technology--sensors which can trigger actions in devices that come within range, increasing their spatial intelligence--shrank in size and...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Strange days indeed...
Scoop.it!

The Google Driverless Car Can Repair itself on Its Own

The Google Driverless Car Can Repair itself on Its Own | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The driverless car by Google is an amazing machine. In our past posts we have mentioned that it can pick and drop a passenger from anywhere. One can impose destination limitation and can prevent it...

Via F. Thunus
Sharrock's insight:

Is that you, KITT?

more...
Nancy Miller 's comment, August 28, 2014 6:06 AM
:*
degrowth economy and ecology's comment, August 28, 2014 6:11 AM
stupidless
Nancy Miller 's comment, August 28, 2014 6:34 AM
It will be doing. They have filed a patent application for it. It is all about AI
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

IBM Sees Broader Role for Watson in Aiding Research

IBM Sees Broader Role for Watson in Aiding Research | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Watson, the IBM system that won "Jeopardy," has shown promise in answering some kinds of questions. Now the company sees a broader role, a bit like the deductions that helped its namesake's famous partner solve fictional crimes.

 

"The company on Thursday is announcing advances in the technology and the availability of what it calls IBM’s Watson Discovery Advisor, a cloud service that it says can help research teams analyze vast troves of data to come up with new research ideas."

Sharrock's insight:

This announcements has implications for The Singularity in that a machine is being scientifically creative. Discovery is one of the creative activities of scientists.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Absurd Creature of the Week: Voracious Velvet Worm Ensnares Foes With Jets of Slime | Science | WIRED

Absurd Creature of the Week: Voracious Velvet Worm Ensnares Foes With Jets of Slime | Science | WIRED | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
One of the animal kingdom’s more non-exclusive semantic clubs is that of the worms. Are you “any of a number of creeping or burrowing invertebrate animals with long, slender, soft bodies and no limbs,” as the New Oxford American Dictionary defines you? Well come on in—we have a seat just for you. From the ferocious…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Time Of Our Lives

The Time Of Our Lives | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Living organisms evolved an internal biological clock, called the circadian rhythm, to help their bodies adapt to the daily cycle of day and night (light and dark) as the Earth rotates every 24 hours. The term "circadian" comes from the Latin words for about (circa) a day (diem).

 

Circadian rhythms are controlled by "clock genes" that code for clock proteins. The levels of these proteins rise and fall in rhythmic patterns. These oscillating biochemical signals control various functions, including when we sleep and rest, and when we are awake and active. Circadian rhythms also control body temperature, heart activity, hormone secretion, blood pressure, oxygen consumption, metabolism, and many other functions.

 

Daily cycles also regulate the levels of substances in our blood, including red blood cells, blood sugar, gases, and ions such as potassium and sodium. Our internal clocks may even influence our mood, particularly in the form of wintertime depression known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD).

 

A biological clock has three parts: a way to receive light, temperature, or other input from the environment; the protein and chemicals that make up the clock itself; and components that help the clock control the activity of other genes.

In the last few decades, scientists have discovered the genes that control internal clocks: period (per), clock (clk), cycle (cyc), timeless (tim), frequency (frq), doubletime (dbt) and others. Clock genes have been found in organisms ranging from people to mice, fish, fruit flies, plants, molds, and even single-celled cyanobacteria.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from The Psychogenyx News Feed
Scoop.it!

The Angry Brain: How to Help Men With Uncontrollable Tempers

The Angry Brain: How to Help Men With Uncontrollable Tempers | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Men with anger management issues present unique problems. But there's a fascinating new route to helping them overcome their tempers. (The Angry Brain: How to Help Men With Uncontrollable Tempers; negative and positive neural plasticity.

Via Luis Valdes
more...
Luis Valdes's curator insight, August 20, 2014 2:52 PM

Outstanding article.  Best of the week so far.  

Rescooped by Sharrock from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Genetically engineered pig hearts survived more than a year in baboon abdomens

Genetically engineered pig hearts survived more than a year in baboon abdomens | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

The heart didn't beat for the baboon, but it did overcome the risk of organ rejection.

 

By breeding piglets with a few choice human genes, scientists were able to create sort-of-pig hearts that seem to be compatible with primate hosts. The organ wasn't used as a heart, but was instead grafted into the abdomen of an otherwise healthy baboon. After over a year, the best of the hearts are still living, viable organs. Next stop, the chest cavity!

 

Researchers at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health will publish their results in the September issue of The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, though their findings were discussed several months ago at a conference. According to the study, the researchers experimented with different degrees of genetic modification in the pigs. They prevented all of the piglets from producing certain enzymes known to cause organ rejection in baboons (and, by extension, humans) but were given different gene alterations to keep blood from clotting, which is another common issue.

 

The most successful group had the human thrombomodulin gene added to their genomes. The expression of this gene prevented clotting, lead investigator Muhammad M. Mohiuddin said in a statement. While the average survival of the other groups were 70 days, 21 days and 80 days, the thrombomodulin group survived an average of 200 days in the baboon abdomen. And three of the five grafts in the group were still alive at 200 to 500 days since their grafting, when the study was submitted for review.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from The Psychogenyx News Feed
Scoop.it!

Brain Hacking Is Having Incredible Effects And It's Just Getting Started - Yahoo News

Brain Hacking Is Having Incredible Effects And It's Just Getting Started - Yahoo News | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Brain Hacking Is Having Incredible Effects And It's Just Getting Started Yahoo News "I don't think there's any doubt we'll eventually understand the brain," says Gary Marcus, a professor of psychology at New York University, and an editor of the...

Via Luis Valdes
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

Computational Linguistics of Twitter Reveals the Existence of Global Superdialects | MIT Technology Review

Computational Linguistics of Twitter Reveals the Existence of Global Superdialects | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

The first study of dialects on Twitter reveals global patterns that have never been observed before. A dialect is a particular form of language limited to a specific region or social group. Linguists are fascinated by dialects because they reveal social classes, patterns of immigration and how groups have influenced each other in the past. Bruno Gonçalves at the University of Toulon in France and David Sánchez at the Institute for Cross-Disciplinary Physics and Complex Systems on the island of Majorca, Spain, say they have found a new way to study dialects on a global scale using messages posted on Twitter. The results reveal a major surprise about the way dialects are distributed around the world and provide a fascinating snapshot of how they are evolving under various new pressures, such as global communication mechanisms like Twitter.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Strange days indeed...
Scoop.it!

A Computer Has Finally Proven the Answer to a 400-Year-Old Math Problem

A Computer Has Finally Proven the Answer to a 400-Year-Old Math Problem | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Way back in 1611, Johannes Kepler suggested that the most efficient way to stack spheres--like arranging oranges for sale--was in a pyramid formation.

Via F. Thunus
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Rapid eLearning
Scoop.it!

Four Ways to Think About Using ThingLink - Rethinking ThingLink

Four Ways to Think About Using ThingLink - Rethinking ThingLink | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

"Thinglink is a powerful tool, and some new uses are making it even more compelling. Beyond creating pictures with links, images, and videos, a “next level” exists that turns ThingLink into a powerful organizer, aggregation tool, and curator."


Via Beth Dichter, Laurent Blanquer, michel verstrepen
more...
Rebekah Lee's curator insight, August 15, 2014 3:29 AM

A pretty nifty way to insert signposts on a screenshot to display  pop up instructions

W. Bradley Gooderham's curator insight, August 15, 2014 1:45 PM

Whoa, just whoa.   ThingLink is so cool and what a great way to densify creative products and engage a diversity of learning pathways!    I am going to include this in my next resume for sure.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, April 22, 8:17 PM

Thinglink is one of my favourite tools :)

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The IoT Immune System

The IoT Immune System | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The IoT Immune System: Swappable systems with “destroy and replace” architectureOne of the most common reaction to my essay on the Internet of Things and the problems we face has been “OK, you
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Preparing Your Students for the Challenges of Tomorrow

Preparing Your Students for the Challenges of Tomorrow | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Here are six ways to prepare students for their future, including the ability to collaborate, evaluate information accuracy, and make every day a learning experience.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Public Relations & Social Media Insight
Scoop.it!

AIntelligent Algorithm Made Discovery That Slipped Past Art Historians For Years | The Creators Project

AIntelligent Algorithm Made Discovery That Slipped Past Art Historians For Years | The Creators Project | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

A recent project used nuanced imaging technology and classification systems to robotize the process of understanding how famous artists have influenced one another.

 

Could a computer program influence how we understand art history and the canon? Or, could an artificially intelligent algorithm do the work of art experts for them? A recent researcher project doesn't quite suggest such a reality, but it does demonstrate that machines can highlight subtleties within arts and culture that humans have previously never noticed.In a paper titled "Toward Automated Discovery Of Artistic Influence" by Babak Saleh and a team of computer science researchers at Rutgers, the academics explained how they used nuanced imaging technology and classification systems to robotize the process of understanding how famous artists have influenced and inspired one another.

 

For their research, the team chose 1,700 paintings by 66 artists, covering the 15th to the late 20th century. Using a technique that analyzes visual concepts called "classemes"—wherein objects, color shades, subjects' movement, and more are marked—the researchers created a list of 3,000 classemes for each painting, data which The Physics arXiv Blog compares to a vector. Then, they used an artificially intelligent algorithm to evaluate the vectors and look for similarities or overlapping qualities among the 1,700 paintings. ArXiv adds, "To create a ground truth against which to measure their results, they also collate expert opinions on which these artists have influenced the others."...


Via Jeff Domansky
more...
Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 28, 2014 10:45 AM

Fascinating application of technology to art and creativity. Good read. 9/10

Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Look at what two years on Mars did to the Curiosity Rover

Look at what two years on Mars did to the Curiosity Rover | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
NASA's Curiosity rover just finished its second year exploring Mars, and the red planet's harsh environment has taken its toll. Rocky terrain, tricky sand dunes, and Martian dust storms have left the robot looking a little worse for wear.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

How 'Google Science' could transform academic publishing

How 'Google Science' could transform academic publishing | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Google is allegedly working on a free, open access platform for the research, collaboration and publishing of peer-reviewed scientific journals

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

33rd Square: Doctors Implant 3D Printed Vertebra for First Time

33rd Square: Doctors Implant 3D Printed Vertebra for First Time | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A hospital in Beijing has carried out the world’s first 3D printed vertebra surgery, to replace the second vertebra in a 12-year-old boy’s neck that had developed cancer.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Quite Interesting News
Scoop.it!

Solar plants causing birds to catch on fire in mid-flight

Solar plants causing birds to catch on fire in mid-flight | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a name for birds that fly through the plant's concentrated sun rays — "streamers," for the smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair.

Via The QI Elves
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Expedition uncovers subglacial life beneath Antarctic ice sheet

Expedition uncovers subglacial life beneath Antarctic ice sheet | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The first breakthrough paper to come out of a massive U.S. expedition to one of Earth's final frontiers shows that there's life and an active ecosystem one-half mile below the surface of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, specifically in a lake that hasn't seen sunlight or felt a breath of wind for millions ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Quoc Le | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review

Quoc Le | Innovators Under 35 | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

While at Stanford, Le worked out a strategy that would let software learn things itself. Academics had begun to report promising but very slow results with a method known as deep learning, which uses networks of simulated neurons. Le saw how to speed it up significantly—by building simulated neural networks 100 times larger that could process thousands of times more data. It was an approach practical enough to attract the attention of Google, which hired him to test it under the guidance of the AI researcher Andrew Ng (see “A Chinese Internet Giant Starts to Dream”).

 
Sharrock's insight:

It amazes me that the idea of machine "deep learning" became public in 2012 (written 8/19/14). That's only 2 years ago! With the invention of the synapse processor chip and chips similar to this, deep learning will probably increase in terms of power, granularity, and impact on even more human-superior tasks: "The technique is now used in Google’s image search and speech-recognition software. The ultra-intelligent machine Le once imagined remains distant. But seeing his ideas make software smart enough to assist people in their everyday lives feels pretty good." Such technology will have more immediate impacts on radiology and diagnostics, as it does in the image search services, but may also increase capabilities in music and reading recommendation services. Who knows what else? 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Predicting PTSD

Predicting PTSD | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
New research suggests that it may be possible to identify who's more likely to have negative lasting effects from trauma—and to stop the symptoms before they start.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

New technique creates highly accurate detailed 3D maps in real time

New technique creates highly accurate detailed 3D maps in real time | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Computer scientists at MIT and the National University of Ireland (NUI) at Maynooth have developed a mapping algorithm that creates dense, highly detailed 3-D maps of indoor and outdoor environments in real time.

 

The researchers tested their algorithm on videos taken with a low-cost Kinect camera, including one that explores the serpentine halls and stairways of MIT’s Stata Center. Applying their mapping technique to these videos, the researchers created rich, three-dimensional maps as the camera explored its surroundings.

 

As the camera circled back to its starting point, the researchers found that after returning to a location recognized as familiar, the algorithm was able to quickly stitch images together to effectively “close the loop,” creating a continuous, realistic 3-D map in real time.

 

The technique solves a major problem in the robotic mapping community that’s known as either “loop closure” or “drift”: As a camera pans across a room or travels down a corridor, it invariably introduces slight errors in the estimated path taken. A doorway may shift a bit to the right, or a wall may appear slightly taller than it is. Over relatively long distances, these errors can compound, resulting in a disjointed map, with walls and stairways that don’t exactly line up.

 

In contrast, the new mapping technique determines how to connect a map by tracking a camera’s pose, or position in space, throughout its route. When a camera returns to a place where it’s already been, the algorithm determines which points within the 3-D map to adjust, based on the camera’s previous poses.

 

“Before the map has been corrected, it’s sort of all tangled up in itself,” says Thomas Whelan, a PhD student at NUI. “We use knowledge of where the camera’s been to untangle it. The technique we developed allows you to shift the map, so it warps and bends into place.”

 

The technique, he says, may be used to guide robots through potentially hazardous or unknown environments. Whelan’s colleague John Leonard, a professor of mechanical engineering at MIT, also envisions a more benign application.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Nikauly Vargas Arias's curator insight, August 14, 2014 4:44 PM

Interesante herramienta para la gestión sostenible del patrimonio construido

Rescooped by Sharrock from Social Foraging
Scoop.it!

Online collaboration: Scientists and the social network

Online collaboration: Scientists and the social network | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

In 2011, Emmanuel Nnaemeka Nnadi needed help to sequence some drug-resistant fungal pathogens. A PhD student studying microbiology in Nigeria, he did not have the expertise and equipment he needed. So he turned to ResearchGate, a free social-networking site for academics, and fired off a few e-mails. When he got a reply from Italian geneticist Orazio Romeo, an inter­national collaboration was born. Over the past three years, the two scientists have worked together on fungal infections in Africa, with Nnadi, now at Plateau State University in Bokkos, shipping his samples to Romeo at the University of Messina for analysis. “It has been a fruitful relationship,” says Nnadi — and they have never even met.


Via Ashish Umre
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sharrock from Blended Librarianship
Scoop.it!

Gartner's 2014 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Maps the Journey to Digital Tech.

Gartner's 2014 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Maps the Journey to Digital Tech. | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The journey to digital business is the key theme of Gartner, Inc.'s

Via John Shank
more...
No comment yet.