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White House Recognizes Local Robotics Team - (multiple names)

White House Recognizes Local Robotics Team - (multiple names) | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
White House Recognizes Local Robotics Team
(multiple names)
A mid-Michigan school is getting attention from the White House for a documentary it put together about finding missing war planes.
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How the Ancient Romans Made Better Concrete Than We Do Now

How the Ancient Romans Made Better Concrete Than We Do Now | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
If you've ever wondered why the ancient structures of Rome have endured for millennia, when our own modern concrete is susceptible to cracks and crumbles, well, now you have your answer.
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Pharmacy Owners, Employees Arrested After Meningitis Outbreak

Pharmacy Owners, Employees Arrested After Meningitis Outbreak | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The 2012 outbreak sickened 750 people in 20 states, killing 64.
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What Is This “Atmospheric River” That Is Flooding California? | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network

What Is This “Atmospheric River” That Is Flooding California? | Observations, Scientific American Blog Network | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
In 1861 an atmospheric river that brought storms for 43 days turned California’s Central Valley into an inland sea 300 miles long and 20 miles wide. Thousands of people died, 800,000 cattle drowned and the state went bankrupt. A similar disaster today would be much more devastating, because the region is much more populated and it is the single largest food producer in the U.S.


"So maybe 1861 was an oddity. Not really. Geologic core samples show that extreme floods like the one in 1861 have happened in California about every 200 years, since the year 200 A.D. So the next disaster could be coming around the bend. The West Coast has actually been slowly constructing large, specialized, meteorological observatories that can sense atmospheric rivers as they develop, so forecasters can give early warnings."

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Phys.Org Mobile: Assessing scientific research by 'citation wake' detects Nobel laureates' papers

Phys.Org Mobile: Assessing scientific research by 'citation wake' detects Nobel laureates' papers | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
"Our wake citation score is less sensitive to the size of the research community of a paper than other existing measures, as we do not focus on the direct citation count of a paper," Bornholdt told Phys.org. "What makes our wake citation score unique is our focus on whether a paper 'started something,' by estimating its 'word of mouth dynamics' from the subsequent citation network."
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DNA nanobots deliver drugs in living cockroaches - health - 08 April 2014 - New Scientist

DNA nanobots deliver drugs in living cockroaches - health - 08 April 2014 - New Scientist | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The DNA computers – known as origami robots because they work by folding and unfolding strands of DNA – travel around the insect's body and interact with each other, as well as the insect's cells. When they uncurl, they can dispense drugs carried in their folds.
Sharrock's insight:

bots in bugs! 

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Phys.Org Mobile: Study shows way to design 'digital' metamaterials

Phys.Org Mobile: Study shows way to design 'digital' metamaterials | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
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definition of term: " Permittivity is the property of a material that describes its reaction to an electric field inside it. As such, it's a key quality to consider when designing optical devices, such as lenses and waveguides. Materials with the desired permittivity may not always exist in nature, however."
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Neuroprosthetics | The Scientist Magazine®

Neuroprosthetics | The Scientist Magazine® | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Beyond the ability to infer intentions about limb and hand movement from neuronal activity, the neuronal signals picked up by these so-called intraparenchymal electrodes can be used to control a robotic limb. Research teams at the University of Pittsburgh, Stanford, Duke, and Brown have each performed real-time control of robotic arms based on the brain activity of macaque monkeys. By implanting electrode arrays into the animals’ motor cortex, for example, Andrew Schwartz of the University of Pittsburgh and colleagues found that the monkeys could manipulate a robotic arm well enough to feed themselves. By tapping into the motor cortex, the researchers recorded the primates’ movement intentions and used the information to control the movement of the robotic arm.4
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New nuclear weapons needed, experts say, pointing to aged arsenal

New nuclear weapons needed, experts say, pointing to aged arsenal | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Warheads in the nation's stockpile are an average of 27 years old, which raises serious concerns about their reliability.
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New largest number factored on a quantum device is 56,153

New largest number factored on a quantum device is 56,153 | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—Researchers have set a new record for the quantum factorization of the largest number to date, 56,153, smashing the previous record of 143 that was set in 2012. They have shown that the exact same room-temperature nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment used to factor 143 can actually ...
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Microbes help vultures eat rotting meat

Microbes help vultures eat rotting meat | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Gut bacteria and strong gastric juices show how the birds can live on decaying flesh.
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Who Will Pay Ebola Patients' Medical Bills in the U.S.?

Who Will Pay Ebola Patients' Medical Bills in the U.S.? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Some hospitals and lawmakers are looking to the federal government to cover treatment, which can total more than $1 million for a single patient.
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Wireless Data Could Travel Twice as Fast Using a New Circuit | MIT Technology Review

Wireless Data Could Travel Twice as Fast Using a New Circuit | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A circuit that lets a radio send and receive data simultaneously over the same frequency could supercharge wireless data transfer.
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Study shows how brain maps develop to help us perceive the world

Study shows how brain maps develop to help us perceive the world | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
the order in which we see things could help the brain calibrate how we perceive time, as well as the objects around us.
Sharrock's insight:

"the order in which we see things could help the brain calibrate how we perceive time, as well as the objects around us."

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Paint or Paint App? Value of Creating Digital Vs. Traditional Art

Paint or Paint App? Value of Creating Digital Vs. Traditional Art | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Teachers say there is value to learning to create using digital tools, especially when blended with more hands-on means of expression.
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For Sale: “Your Name Here” in a Prestigious Science Journal

For Sale: “Your Name Here” in a Prestigious Science Journal | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
An investigation into some scientific papers finds worrying irregularities
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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5 Creepy Ways Your Town Is Designed to Control Your Mind

5 Creepy Ways Your Town Is Designed to Control Your Mind | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
All around you are little design choices you've probably never even noticed, that are absolutely influencing you.
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Smarter Artificial Skin for Prosthetic Hands | MIT Technology Review

Smarter Artificial Skin for Prosthetic Hands | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
South Korean and U.S. researchers have developed a stretchable material that senses touch, pressure, and moisture, and could be used to give artificial limbs feeling.
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NTU develops ultra-fast charging batteries that last 20 years

NTU develops ultra-fast charging batteries that last 20 years | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Scientists at Nanyang Technology University (NTU) have developed ultra-fast charging batteries that can be recharged up to 70 per cent in only two minutes.

The new generation batteries also have a long lifespan of over 20 years, more than 10 times compared to existing lithium-ion batteries.
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Sociologist Orlando Patterson does landmark work on slavery and freedom. | Harvard Magazine Nov-Dec 2014

Sociologist Orlando Patterson does landmark work on slavery and freedom. | Harvard Magazine Nov-Dec 2014 | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

The study of culture—of values, established ideas, traditions, language, customs, learned behaviors, symbolic materials, including the arts, and other nonbiological inheritances—has been central to Patterson’s work. Sociologists often contrast culture with structure: the “hard” variables that include prevailing institutions, distribution of wealth, education, housing, jobs, and other “physical-world” factors. For decades, researchers have debated whether culture informs structure, or vice versa.

"Many scholars oversimplify culture by equating it simply with values, Patterson says. This can lead to paradoxes like citing the same cultural complex as the cause of opposite results. “Confucianism was used in the past to explain backwardness in China, before it became successful. The Confucian ethic was supposedly inconsistent with capitalism,” he explains. “Then China becomes economically successful, and suddenly it is the Confucian ethic that explains its success. The same cultural values can move in either direction. So you need a dynamic approach that shows how culture interacts with structure."

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Mitochondria Munchers | The Scientist Magazine®

Mitochondria Munchers | The Scientist Magazine® | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Most cells clean up their own damaged mitochondria by transporting the organelles into lysosomes, where they are digested internally. Lysosomes are located in the cell body, so neurons with long axons were thought to shuttle far-off axonal mitochondria back to the cell bodies for disposal. Nicholas Marsh-Armstrong of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and colleagues observed that in mice, retinal glial cells called astrocytes, clustered around the head of the optic nerve, were constantly chomping up cellular parcels extruded by axons in the nerve, leading Marsh-Armstrong to wonder what the neurons might be exporting for degradation.
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Study shows graphene able to withstand a speeding bullet

Study shows graphene able to withstand a speeding bullet | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
ABSTRACT
Multilayer graphene is an exceptional anisotropic material due to its layered structure composed of two-dimensional carbon lattices. Although the intrinsic mechanical properties of graphene have been investigated at quasi-static conditions, its behavior under extreme dynamic conditions has not yet been studied. We report the high–strain-rate behavior of multilayer graphene over a range of thicknesses from 10 to 100 nanometers by using miniaturized ballistic tests. Tensile stretching of the membrane into a cone shape is followed by initiation of radial cracks that approximately follow crystallographic directions and extend outward well beyond the impact area. The specific penetration energy for multilayer graphene is ~10 times more than literature values for macroscopic steel sheets at 600 meters per second.
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Synthetic biology, genetic engineering and you: Two-component signaling pathways as elements in synthetic circuit design

Synthetic biology, genetic engineering and you: Two-component signaling pathways as elements in synthetic circuit design | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
When asked if a longer-term implication of their study might be that an ability to implement robust logic circuits in mammalian cells could lead to a novel translational approach to medical protocols, Benenson replied, "I think that this novel methodology will mesh with existing synthetic biology tools to enable better, more robust, and more programmable gene circuits for rational control of cell physiology, including the control of cell fate or the detection of pathological cell states. Being a signaling cascade, transplanted two-component pathways might improve the speed of information processing in these circuits and enable new ways to sense metabolites." That said, he points that metabolite sensing will have to be experimentally demonstrated.
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How lapping canine tongues create columns of liquid, allowing them to gulp down water

How lapping canine tongues create columns of liquid, allowing them to gulp down water | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
If you've ever watched a dog drink water, you know that it can be a sloshy, spilly, splashy affair—in other words, adorable.
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excerpt: "Behind all of the happy, wet messes, however, lies the mechanical logic of carnivorous compensation—dogs splash when they drink because they have the cheeks of a predatory quadruped. By studying the drinking habits of various dog breeds and sizes, a group of researchers at Virginia Tech and Purdue University has recently identified and modeled the fluid dynamics at play when dogs drink water."

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Researchers Provide First Peek at How Neurons Multitask

Researchers Provide First Peek at How Neurons Multitask | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Michigan have shown how a single neuron can perform multiple functions in a model organism, illuminating for the first time this fundamental biological mechanism and shedding light on the human brain.

Investigators in the lab of Shawn Xu at the Life Sciences Institute found that a neuron in C. elegans, a tiny worm with a simple nervous system used as a model for studying sensation, movement and other neurological function, regulates both the speed and direction in which the worm moves. The individual neurons can route information through multiple downstream neural circuits, with each circuit controlling a specific behavioral output.

The findings are scheduled for online publication in the journal Cell on Nov. 6. The research is also featured on the cover.

"Understanding how the nervous system and genes lead to behavior is a fundamental question in neuroscience, and we wanted to figure out how C. elegans are able to perform a wide range of complex behaviors with their small nervous systems," Xu said.

The C. elegans nervous system contains 302 neurons.

"Scientists think that even though humans have billions of neurons, some perform multiple functions. Seeing the mechanism in worms will help to understand the human brain," Xu said.

The model neuron studied, AIY, regulates at least two distinct motor outputs: locomotion speed and direction-switch. AIY interacts with two circuits, one that is inhibitory and controls changes in the direction of the worm's movement, and a second that is excitatory and controls speed.

"It's important to note that these two circuits have connections with other neurons and may cross-talk with each other," Xu said. "Neuronal control of behavior is very complex."

Xu is a faculty member in the U-M Life Sciences Institute, where his laboratory is located and research conducted. He is also a professor of molecular and integrative physiology at the U-M Medical School.

Other authors on the paper were Zhaoyu Li, Jie Liu and Maohua Zheng, also of the Life Sciences Institute and Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology in the U-M Medical School.
The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health.
Shawn Xu: www.lsi.umich.edu/labs/shawn-xu-lab ;


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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