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Hypnosis as a research tool | Hypnosis.Tools

Hypnotic suggestion can be used to model unusual conditions or behaviours in order to study them more closely. Used this way as a research tool hypnotic suggestion can be of significant use to psychologists, cognitive neuroscientists, and medical researchers. This page reviews a number of recent examples of this kind of use of hypnosis in research.

"Imaging techniques of the living brain may illuminate the anatomical and functional nature of hypnosis. Moreover, hypnosis can also be used as a tool to study cognitive phenomena, as we unravel some of the neural mechanisms subserving hypnotic expression." (Raz & Shaipro, 2002).

"As researchers who are not familiar with hypnosis gain confidence in its strategic use in mainstream psychological and neuropsychological work we can expect to see a resurgence in its popularity as a practical tool." (Oakley, 2006).

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Just how plastic is the brain?

Just how plastic is the brain? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Differences between M.M. and controls were also seen in brain scans. Typically, the ventral visual cortex shows different patterns of activity depending on whether you are viewing a face, an object, or a scene – but M.M. didn’t seem to have developed the necessary networks.
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Molecular cartography of the human skin surface in 3D

Molecular cartography of the human skin surface in 3D | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

The human skin is an organ with a surface area of 1.5–2 m2 that provides our interface with the environment. The molecular composition of this organ is derived from host cells, microbiota, and external molecules. The chemical makeup of the skin surface is largely undefined. Here we advance the technologies needed to explore the topographical distribution of skin molecules, using 3D mapping of mass spectrometry data and microbial 16S rRNA amplicon sequences. Our 3D maps reveal that the molecular composition of skin has diverse distributions and that the composition is defined not only by skin cells and microbes but also by our daily routines, including the application of hygiene products. The technological development of these maps lays a foundation for studying the spatial relationships of human skin with hygiene, the microbiota, and environment, with potential for developing predictive models of skin phenotypes tailored to individual health.


Amina Bouslimani, Carla Porto, Christopher M. Rath, Mingxun Wang, Yurong Guo, Antonio Gonzalez, Donna Berg-Lyon, Gail Ackermann, Gitte Julie Moeller Christensen, Teruaki Nakatsuji, Lingjuan Zhang, Andrew W. Borkowski, Michael J. Meehan, Kathleen Dorrestein, Richard L. Galla, Nuno Bandeira, Rob Knight, Theodore Alexandrova,j,k,l,2, and Pieter C. Dorrestein

PNAS

doi: 10.1073/pnas.1424409112


Via NatProdChem
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Synthetic quorum-sensing circuit to control consortial biofilm formation and dispersal in a microfluidic device : Nature Communications : Nature Publishing Group

Synthetic quorum-sensing circuit to control consortial biofilm formation and dispersal in a microfluidic device : Nature Communications : Nature Publishing Group | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Via Socrates Logos
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​Airlines Are Getting Crappier, Study Confirms

​Airlines Are Getting Crappier, Study Confirms | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
From less legroom to inedible plane food, almost everything about the flying experience feels like it’s getting worse. Turns out, it’s not just your imagination -- a new study shows that, while carriers are making more money than ever, the service they provide is reaching new levels of suckiness.
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Hair Regrowth Discovery Suggests Skin Cells Communicate Like Bacteria

Hair Regrowth Discovery Suggests Skin Cells Communicate Like Bacteria | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A chemical signaling system called quorum sensing allows those single-celled bugs to detect when their numbers have multiplied enough to mount an effective attack or emit glowing light. Yet decades after scientists learned about this brainless bacterial coordination a research team has uncovered new evidence suggesting animal cells may speak the same lingo.
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The 5 Biggest Reasons People Get Anxious or Depressed - PsyBlog

The 5 Biggest Reasons People Get Anxious or Depressed - PsyBlog | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Plus: three thinking styles which can lead to depression and anxiety.
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Phys.Org Mobile: New mitochondrially-derived peptides show what they can do

Phys.Org Mobile: New mitochondrially-derived peptides show what they can do | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
These results suggest that mitochondria may actively regulate metabolic homeostasis at the cellular and organismal level via peptides encoded within their genome.
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Your Brain Detects Confidence In Voices Faster Than You Can Blink

Your Brain Detects Confidence In Voices Faster Than You Can Blink | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

New research puts a finer point on the confidence issue by tracking changes in listeners’ brain activity when hearing someone make a statement. The results suggest that the brain detects and assesses confidence in another’s voice in as little as 0.2 seconds.


Via Maggie Rouman
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Scientists use immunotherapy to reduce memory problems with Alzheimer’s disease

Scientists use immunotherapy to reduce memory problems with Alzheimer’s disease | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has revealed that a single dose of an immunotherapy reverses memory problems in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease.
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Magnetic nanoparticles open blood-brain barrier for delivery of therapeutic molecules

Magnetic nanoparticles open blood-brain barrier for delivery of therapeutic molecules | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The blood-brain barrier is a highly selective semipermeable barrier running inside almost all vessels in the brain that lets through water, some gases and a few other select molecules, while preventing potentially toxic elements in the blood from...
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Has Technology Changed Us?: BBC Animations Answer the Question with the Help of Marshall McLuhan (Video)

Has Technology Changed Us?: BBC Animations Answer the Question with the Help of Marshall McLuhan (Video) | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
“BBC Radio 4 addressing the question 'How Did Everything Begin?' In February, we featured its follow-up on an equally eternal question, 'What Makes Us Human?' Both came scripted by Philosophy Bites co-creator Nigel Warburton and narrated by X-Files co-star Gillian Anderson (in full British mode).”
Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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New research finds oceanic microbes behave in synchrony across ocean basins

New research finds oceanic microbes behave in synchrony across ocean basins | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
"Surprisingly, however," said Aylward, "our work shows that these extremely different ecosystems exhibit very similar diel cycles, driven largely by sunlight and interspecies microbial interactions. This suggests that different microbial communities across the Pacific Ocean, and likely waters across the entire planet, behave in much more orderly ways than has previously been supposed."  
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Pain | Hypnosis.Tools

Hypnosis is an extremely effective treatment for both acute and chronic pain. Pain is one of the few areas where hypnosis can be applied clinically in the absence of a broader treatment framework - although hypnosis allied to cognitive behavioural techniques may well be an extremely effective intervention.

A number of studies have examined the effectiveness of hypnosis in treating pain, either when used alone or alongside cognitive behavioural therapy. Pain is one of the best-researched areas - there have been a number of meta-analyses (literally a study of studies - one of the most a reliable ways to find out if there is an effect) of hypnosis for pain control.
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Catching a Molecule in an Excited State

Catching a Molecule in an Excited State | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A twist on an established imaging method has detected a molecule’s short-lived, excited state, raising the possibility of movies of chemical reactions.

 

Masakazu Yamazaki, Keiya Oishi, Hiroyuki Nakazawa, Chaoyuan Zhu, and Masahiko Takahashi

Molecular Orbital Imaging of the Acetone S2 Excited State Using Time-Resolved (e, 2e) Electron Momentum Spectroscopy

Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 103005 (2015)

 


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Researchers engineer bacterium to hunt down and kill pathogens

Researchers engineer bacterium to hunt down and kill pathogens | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Recent examples of new genetic circuits that enable cells to acquire biosynthetic capabilities, such as specific pathogen killing, present an attractive therapeutic application of synthetic biology. A team of researchers in Singapore has developed a technique for bioengineering a bacterium to seek out and kill targeted pathogens.

 

They demonstrate a novel genetic circuit that reprograms Escherichia coli to specifically recognize, migrate toward, and eradicate both dispersed and biofilm-encased pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells. The reprogrammed E. coli degraded the mature biofilm matrix and killed the latent cells encapsulated within by expressing and secreting the antimicrobial peptide microcin S and the nuclease DNaseI upon the detection of quorum sensing molecules naturally secreted by P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, the reprogrammed E. coli exhibited directed motility toward the pathogen through regulated expression of CheZ in response to the quorum sensing molecules.

 

By integrating the pathogen-directed motility with the dual antimicrobial activity in E. coli, we achieved signifincantly improved killing activity against planktonic and mature biofilm cells due to target localization, thus creating an active pathogen seeking killer E. coli.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, NCPbiology
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NCPbiology's curator insight, June 27, 2014 6:26 AM

Interesting extra reading?

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Human embryos make viral proteins within days of fertilization, a new study shows

Human embryos make viral proteins within days of fertilization, a new study shows | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

A fertilized human egg may seem like the ultimate blank slate. But within days of fertilization, the growing mass of cells activates not only human genes but also viral DNA lingering in the human genome from ancient infections. Now researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found that the early human cells produce viral proteins, and even become crowded with what appear to be assembled viral particles. These viral proteins could manipulate some of the earliest steps in human development, affecting gene expression and even possibly protecting the cells from further viral infection.

 

The finding raises questions as to who, or what, is really pulling the strings during human embryogenesis. “It’s both fascinating and a little creepy,” said Joanna Wysocka, PhD, associate professor of developmental biology and of chemical and systems biology. “We’ve discovered that a specific class of viruses that invaded the human genome during recent evolution becomes reactivated in the early development of the human embryo, leading to the presence of viral-like particles and proteins in the human cells.” A paper describing the findings was published online April 20 in Nature.

 

Retroviruses are a class of virus that insert their DNA into the genome of the host cell for later reactivation. In this stealth mode, the virus bides its time, taking advantage of cellular DNA replication to spread to each of an infected cell’s progeny every time the cell divides. HIV is one well-known example of a retrovirus that infects humans.

 

When a retrovirus infects a germ cell, which makes sperm and eggs, or infects a very early-stage embryo before the germ cells have arisen, the viral DNA is passed along to future generations. Over evolutionary time, however, these viral genomes often become mutated and inactivated. About 8 percent of the human genome is made up of viral sequences left behind during past infections.

 

One retrovirus, HERVK, however, infected humans repeatedly until relatively recently — within about 200,000 years. Much of HERVK’s genome is still snuggled, intact, in each of our cells.

 

Most of these sequences are inactive in mature cells, but recent research has shown that they can spring to life in tumor cells or in human embryonic stem cells. A study published in February in Cell Stem Cell by researchers from Singapore’s Genome Institute showed that sequences from a primate virus called HERVH are also activated in early human development.

 

Now the Stanford researchers have shown for the first time that viral proteins are abundantly present in the developing human embryo and assemble into what appear to be viral particles in electron microscopy images. By following up with additional studies in human embryonic cells grown in vitro, scientists showed that these viral proteins affect gene expression in the developing embryo and may protect the cells from infection by other viruses.

 

But it’s not clear whether this sequence of events is the result of thousands of years of co-existence, a kind of evolutionary symbiosis, or if it represents an ongoing battle between humans and viruses. “Does the virus selfishly benefit by switching itself on in these early embryonic cells?” said Grow. “Or is the embryo instead commandeering the viral proteins to protect itself? Can they both benefit? That’s possible, but we don’t really know.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Revolution In Robotics | MIT Technology Review

The Revolution In Robotics | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The Revolution In Robotics In this content collection, MIT Technology Review takes a look at the latest robotic technologies. Editors and contributors discuss the growing use of robots and drones in medicine, agriculture, and other industries—as well as in our homes. Learn about efforts to develop robot security guards, automated home health aides, an air traffic control system for drones, and much more.
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Study Deciphers the Noise in the Human Brain

Study Deciphers the Noise in the Human Brain | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Electrical recordings directly from the human brain show remarkable precision in the coordination of widely distributed regions involved in memory recall, at rest and during sleep.
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Uber: The Big Data Company

Uber: The Big Data Company | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
As I write this column, I am at my office on Main Street in San Francisco. When I’m done here, I’ll head back to my house in the Richmond District to pick up some luggage as I head to SFO.
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‘Nanoneedles’ generate new blood vessels in mice, paving the way for new regenerative medicine

‘Nanoneedles’ generate new blood vessels in mice, paving the way for new regenerative medicine | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
“Scientists have developed “nanoneedles” that have successfully prompted parts of the body to generate new blood vessels, in a trial in mice.The researchers, from Imperial College London and Houston Methodist Research Institute in the USA, hope their nanoneedle technique could ultimately help damaged organs and nerves repair themselves and help transplanted organs thrive.In a trial described in Nature Materials, the team showed they could deliver nucleic acids DNA and siRNA to back muscles in mice. After seven days there was a six-fold increase in the formation of new blood vessels in the mouse back muscles, and blood vessels continued to form over a 14 day period.The nanoneedles are tiny porous structures that act as a sponge to load significantly more nucleic acids than solid structures. This makes them more effective at delivering their payload. They can penetrate the cell, bypassing its outer membrane, to deliver nucleic acids without harming or killing the cell.The nanoneedles are made from biodegradable silicon, meaning that they can be left in the body without leaving a toxic residue behind. The silicon degrades in about two days, leaving behind only a negligible amount of a harmless substance called orthosilicic acid.”

The hope is that one day scientists will be able to help promote the generation of new blood vessels in people, using nanoneedles, to provide transplanted organs or future artificial organ implants with the necessary connections to the rest of the body, so that they can function properly with a minimal chance of being rejected.

“This is a quantum leap compared to existing technologies for the delivery of genetic material to cells and tissues,” said Ennio Tasciotti, Co-Chair, Department of Nanomedicine at Houston Methodist Research Institute and co-corresponding author of the paper.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Literally Nothing Will Stick To This New Slippery Surface

Literally Nothing Will Stick To This New Slippery Surface | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new generation of materials could radically reduce unwanted stickiness and solve lots of problems. The technology is called SLIPS—or Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces.
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Quadcopter converted into balloon-hunting Laser Drone

Quadcopter converted into balloon-hunting Laser Drone | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The ability to view real-time video from a quadcopter's onboard camera is certainly a handy feature, but let's be honest – there are probably a lot of people who just think, "Wouldn't be great if I could use this to shoot at stuff?
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Marshall McLuhan's Four Innovation Fundamentals | Big Think Edge | Big Think

Marshall McLuhan's Four Innovation Fundamentals | Big Think Edge | Big Think | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
“ Marshall McLuhan, the outlandish visionary of 60s and 70s who predicted the World Wide Web, created a blueprint for innovation in the digital age. ”
Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 11, 2013 3:55 AM

Some interesting points to reflect on in this article.

Larchmont Films's comment, July 11, 2013 5:15 AM
He definitely foresaw Twitter with his household "the medium is the message" It's changed the way many people write.
Tracy Mehoke (梅恬溪)'s curator insight, July 22, 2013 5:35 AM

These points from the article are soothing in a way.


1. Innovation has to enhance something

 

2. Innovation needs to destroy something old

 

3. An innovation returns us to something that we feel we’ve lost

 

4. Innovation over time becomes anti-innovation

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Data Security Is Becoming the Sparkle in Bitcoin

Data Security Is Becoming the Sparkle in Bitcoin | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Underlying Bitcoin — created as a way to make payments directly, anonymously and outside government control — is the block chain, a decentralized database that is driven by cryptography.

 
Sharrock's insight:

I've read an article (that I need to find) about how block chain technology could solve issues of copyright and creative works protection. I have to find it.

 

excerpt: "Entrepreneurs worldwide are now working to harness that technology for use beyond Bitcoin transactions. The block chain, they say, could ultimately upend not only the traditional financial system but also the way people transfer and record financial assets like stocks, contracts, property titles, patents and marriage licenses — essentially anything that requires a trusted middleman for verification."

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