Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
2.4K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Sharrock from Amazing Science
onto Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
Scoop.it!

New device to store electricity on silicon chips themselves

New device to store electricity on silicon chips themselves | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

All the things that define us in a modern environment require electricity,” said Pint. “The more that we can integrate power storage into existing materials and devices, the more compact and efficient they will become.” New device stores electricity on silicon chips.

 

Solar cells that produce electricity 24/7, not just when the sun is shining. Mobile phones with built-in power cells that recharge in seconds and work for weeks between charges. These are just two of the possibilities raised by a novel supercapacitor design invented by material scientists at Vanderbilt University that is described in a paper published in the Oct. 22, 2013 issue of the journal Scientific Reports.

 

It is the first supercapacitor that is made out of silicon so it can be built into a silicon chip along with the microelectronic circuitry that it powers. In fact, it should be possible to construct these power cells out of the excess silicon that exists in the current generation of solar cells, sensors, mobile phones and a variety of other electromechanical devices, providing a considerable cost savings.

 

“If you ask experts about making a supercapacitor out of silicon, they will tell you it is a crazy idea,” said Cary Pint, the assistant professor of mechanical engineering who headed the development. “But we’ve found an easy way to do it.”

 

Instead of storing energy in chemical reactions the way batteries do, “supercaps” store electricity by assembling ions on the surface of a porous material. As a result, they tend to charge and discharge in minutes, instead of hours, and operate for a few million cycles, instead of a few thousand cycles like batteries.

 

“The big challenge for this approach is assembling the materials,” said Pint. “Constructing high-performance, functional devices out of nanoscale building blocks with any level of control has proven to be quite challenging, and when it is achieved it is difficult to repeat.” 

 

With experience in growing carbon nanostructures, Pint’s group decided to try to coat the porous silicon surface with carbon. “We had no idea what would happen,” said Pint. “Typically, researchers grow graphene from silicon-carbide materials at temperatures in excess of 1400 degrees Celsius. But at lower temperatures – 600 to 700 degrees Celsius – we certainly didn’t expect graphene-like material growth.”

 

 

When the researchers pulled the porous silicon out of the furnace, they found that it had turned from orange to purple or black. When they inspected it under a powerful scanning electron microscope they found that it looked nearly identical to the original material but it was coated by a layer of graphene a few nanometers thick.

 

 

When the researchers tested the coated material they found that it had chemically stabilized the silicon surface. When they used it to make supercapacitors, they found that the graphene coating improved energy densities by over two orders of magnitude compared to those made from uncoated porous silicon and significantly better than commercial supercapacitors.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
Technology/Futurism/Science/Education/SystemsThinking/
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

AI, machine learning blossom in agriculture and pest control

AI, machine learning blossom in agriculture and pest control | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
In a departure from using AI and machine learning tools for tasks such as automating customer service, some companies are applying the technologies to grow better corn crop
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Trapping a Self-Driving Car is Surprisingly Easy | Nerdist

Trapping a Self-Driving Car is Surprisingly Easy | Nerdist | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It looks like self-driving cars are the future, doesn't it? Studies have suggested traffic would be quicker to navigate with a robot behind the wheel instead of
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

A Tweet to Kurt Eichenwald, a Strobe and a Seizure. Now, an Arrest. - NYTimes.com

A Tweet to Kurt Eichenwald, a Strobe and a Seizure. Now, an Arrest. - NYTimes.com | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
When the journalist Kurt Eichenwald opened an animated image sent to him on Twitter in December, the message “You deserve a seizure for your posts” appeared in capital letters along with a blinding strobe light. Mr. Eichenwald, who has epilepsy, immediately suffered a seizure.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

366 links to understand fact-checking in 2016

366 links to understand fact-checking in 2016 | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
2016 was fact-checking’s finest year [1]. No it wasn’t, it was the year of “post-truth” [2] — some preferred “post-fact” [3] — and fact-checking is a fool’…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How is technology changing finance the way we know it?

How is technology changing finance the way we know it? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Jamie Dimon of JP Morgan famously remarked to his wall street colleagues “Silicon Valley is coming to eat our lunch”. The anxiousness of disruption (by startups) at the corridor of large global banks…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Newly Discovered Fossil Reveals Ancient Penguins Were Huge

Newly Discovered Fossil Reveals Ancient Penguins Were Huge | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The ancient penguin was the size of a small adult human, which says a lot about penguins' evolution. Learn more about the discovery at HowStuffWorks.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Swine Flu Virus Has Mutated Dangerously

The Swine Flu Virus Has Mutated Dangerously | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The virus has already infected more than 25,000 people across India this year
Sharrock's insight:
"The point we're trying to make is that there is a real need for aggressive surveillance to ensure that the anxiety and hysteria are brought down and people are able to focus on what they really need to worry about," said Sasisekharan.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Why Neuroscientists Need to Study the Crow - Issue 40: Learning - Nautilus

Why Neuroscientists Need to Study the Crow - Issue 40: Learning - Nautilus | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Corvids, such as crows, ravens, and magpies, are among the most intelligent birds on the planet—the list of their cognitive achievements goes on and on—yet neuroscientists have not scrutinized their brains for one simple reason: They don’t have a neocortex.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

The Computational Social Science Society of the Americas | CSSSA

The Computational Social Science Society of the Americas | CSSSA | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Computational Social Science (CSS) is the science that investigates social and behavioral dynamics through social simulation,social network analysis, and social media analysis. The Computational Social Science Society of the Americas (CSSSA) is a professional society that aims to advance the field of computational social science in all its areas, including basic and applied orientations, by holding conferences and workshops, promoting standards of scientific excellence in research, teaching, and publishing research findings and results.

CSSSA has the goals of:

1) Improve the scientific credibility of computational social science.

2) Maintain a institutionally neutral society characterized by scientific integrity.

3) Promote the advancement of computational social science through scientific exchange, transparency, and open discussion.

Scientific progress requires scientists to build upon previous research and developments of their peers and give explicit credit to these peers — to foster trust and integrity. Publishing your research, providing transparency into your algorithms and computer models is strongly encouraged via the Open Agent-Based Modeling Consortium. In addition to providing an open repository for models and simulations OpenABM also provides a valuable forum for collaboration, learning, and networking.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Creature 344: Euhaplorchis californiensis

Creature 344: Euhaplorchis californiensis | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Another mind altering parasite Euhaplorchis californiensis is a flatworm parasite which has three different hosts.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Snow and sand erosion explained

Snow and sand erosion explained | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Scientists at EPFL and SLF describe with precision how snow and sand surfaces erode when exposed to wind. Their description can contribute to better predictions of dust emissions from deserts and snow transport in Antarctica
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

History of Mechanical Calculators - Part I

History of Mechanical Calculators - Part I | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The purpose of this document is to briefly describe the most common non-electronic calculating devices within an historical context, and to create a source of reference to other pages in the Internet related with this topic. The journey starts 2500 years ago with the Abacus, and ends 30 years ago with the introduction of the first electronic calculators.

In order to facilitate the download, the document has been split into three parts: Part I, describes the evolution of the calculating devices up to the invention of the Stepped Wheel by Leibniz. Part II, discusses the main events during the 19th Century, and Part III reviews the development of office machines until the 1960's when the first electronic calculators appeared in the market.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Here's Why Listening to Sad Music Makes You Feel Better

Here's Why Listening to Sad Music Makes You Feel Better | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new study sheds light on what's going on inside our brains when we match our music to our feels, and it looks like sad music can be enjoyable - rather than simply depressing - because it triggers positive memories that can help to lift our mood.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Peru floods kill 67 and spark criticism of country's climate change preparedness

Peru floods kill 67 and spark criticism of country's climate change preparedness | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Devastating downpour, caused by high ocean temperatures, could not have been predicted, president said, months after state of emergency declared for wildfires
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How the Wave Disk Generator Works

How the Wave Disk Generator Works | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The wave disk generator propulsion system could revolutionize the way we move our vehicles. Read about what makes the wave disk generator so special.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

And I Think To Myself, What A Virtual World

And I Think To Myself, What A Virtual World | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Academia, public sector, and commercial enterprises are all looking to go
digital and virtual in one fashion or another. What does this world look
like? Expert Chuc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

After 100 Years of Debate, Hitting Absolute Zero Has Been Declared Mathematically Impossible

After 100 Years of Debate, Hitting Absolute Zero Has Been Declared Mathematically Impossible | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The Third Law Of Thermodynamics finally gets its proof.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

Why Are Gorillas Committing Mob Violence?

Why Are Gorillas Committing Mob Violence? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
For the first time, these great apes have been seen ganging up on single males—and researchers don’t know the reason. Among the gorillas, females and juveniles also took part in the beatings. That was the most surprising part of the discovery, says Martha Robbins, a primatologist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology who has studied these gorillas. “I find it extremely unlikely that an adult female with a small baby attached would start biting a silverback, who is twice her size,” she says. And yet that’s exactly what Rosenbaum saw. “They were actual participants: hair-pulling, biting, kicking.”
more...
No comment yet.