Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Five Best Document Scanners for Going Paperless

Five Best Document Scanners for Going Paperless | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Not every scanner is a great one if you're thinking about going paperless.
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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Creativity will be the source of our next industrial revolution, not machines

Creativity will be the source of our next industrial revolution, not machines | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Growth in the first industrial revolution was driven by engineering, the second through electricity and production lines, and the third by technology and information. The modern economies that will undergo a fourth industrial revolution will not be those that worship machines, but those that support human creativity. When we understand how people think an
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New Guide Offers Dialogue and Guidance on Vicarious Trauma

New Guide Offers Dialogue and Guidance on Vicarious Trauma | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
MENU New Guide Offers Dialogue and Guidance on Vicarious Trauma Our third handbook is about the challenges posed by vicarious trauma, and provides practical tips and guidance to journalists, newsroom managers and universities. Journalism and Vicarious Trauma Guide Illustrations by Hannah Barrett Aimee Rinehart by: Aimee Rinehart Date: April 19, 2017 4 mins Recommend: 0 Log in to save this article Add to a pack Share: Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone Tags: best practice, guide, vicarious trauma “Twenty years ago, we’d have maybe two edits from the Hungarian border because of the cost of doing feeds, and it would have been packaged on the ground, you’d get broadcastable packages. Now everything just comes in…that filter has disappeared.” As this agency journalist explains, the amount of graphic content journalists view every day on their computers has increased substantially. Furthermore research has shown that levels of vicarious trauma in newsroom staff is also on the rise. The sheer number of images and videos shot by eyewitnesses, but also the unfiltered nature of the content, has bought the realities of the field into the newsroom. In our third handbook, “Journalism and Vicarious Trauma: A Guide for Journalists, Editors and News Organisations,” Sam Dubberley and Michele Grant have written about the challenges posed by vicarious trauma and provide practical tips and guidance. The guide is relevant for journalists at different stages of their newsroom careers as well as decision makers in the newsroom and human resources departments. The guide will also be useful for journalism professors who need to equip future journalists with the tools to cope with the new realities of the job. Journalism and Vicarious TraumaWe define vicarious trauma in the guide as exposure to distressing images and videos that can cause similar emotional responses as when someone witnesses trauma firsthand in the field. The risk of vicarious trauma is supported by research from Eyewitness Media Hub in its report, “Making Secondary Trauma a Primary Issue: A Study of Eyewitness Media and Vicarious Trauma on the Digital Frontline,” and argues that as well as geographic frontlines, we need to think about the digital frontline.
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Laennec’s Baton: A Short History of the Stethoscope

Laennec’s Baton: A Short History of the Stethoscope | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Since its invention in 1816, the stethoscope has become one of the most iconic symbols of the medical profession. Yet there was a time when doctors had to assess the inner sounds of the human body unaided. In 350 B.C., Hippocrates—the ‘Father of Medicine’—suggested gently shaking the patient by the shoulders, while applying one’s ear directly to the chest in order to determine the presence of thoracic empyema, or pus in the lungs. For over a thousand years, medical practitioners would follow in Hippocrates’s footsteps, relying on only their ears to diagnose chest infections in patients.

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Reconstructive memory: Confabulating the past, simulating the future

Reconstructive memory: Confabulating the past, simulating the future | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The term ‘Rashomon effect’ is often used by psychologists in situations where observers give different accounts of the same event,and describes the effect of subjective perceptions on recollection. The phenomenon is named after a 1950 film by the great Japanese director Akira Kurosawa. It was with Rashōmon that Western cinema-goers discovered both Kurosawa and Japanese film in general – the film won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1951, as well as the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film the following year.

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Confabulations of Everyday Life

Confabulations of Everyday Life | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Is a memoir ever free from confabulations, if not outright lies? Can we ever give an honest account of our history without embellishing the facts? Even with the most generous and forgiving view of Frey, is there something about the nature of autobiography that makes it bound to be forged? The cognitive psychologist Ulric Neisser described memory retrieval as a kind of cognitive paleontology: much like dinosaur bones, we have bits and fragments of episodic memory that have been encoded. When we recall our past, we reconstruct these pieces into coherent narratives, filling in the blanks. And of course, these reconstructions change over time and meet the idiosyncratic, often unconscious needs of the present moment.

Sharrock's insight:
From the Great Courses Series, Steven Novella, M.D.lectures for a course on critical thinking called "Your Deceptive Mind". He introduces the term "confabulation." Although this article refers to psychopathology, it describes the less publicized neurotypical fallibility of our memories. He says that memory retrieval is better described as a constructive process, and that unlike our past beliefs in memory, we actually can "lose" memories, something hard for me to believe. Even though I have often faced complete losses of events that others remember and recount to me, I had always blamed the loss as more of a retrieval problem. But maybe the memories simply aren't there in my brain anymore. 
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How a visual effects studio helped complete Paul Walker’s role in 'Furious 7'

How a visual effects studio helped complete Paul Walker’s role in 'Furious 7' | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Peter Jackson's Weta Digital stepped in to complete Walker's role in the film.
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AI, machine learning blossom in agriculture and pest control

AI, machine learning blossom in agriculture and pest control | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
In a departure from using AI and machine learning tools for tasks such as automating customer service, some companies are applying the technologies to grow better corn crop
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Trapping a Self-Driving Car is Surprisingly Easy | Nerdist

Trapping a Self-Driving Car is Surprisingly Easy | Nerdist | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It looks like self-driving cars are the future, doesn't it? Studies have suggested traffic would be quicker to navigate with a robot behind the wheel instead of
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A Tweet to Kurt Eichenwald, a Strobe and a Seizure. Now, an Arrest. - NYTimes.com

A Tweet to Kurt Eichenwald, a Strobe and a Seizure. Now, an Arrest. - NYTimes.com | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
When the journalist Kurt Eichenwald opened an animated image sent to him on Twitter in December, the message “You deserve a seizure for your posts” appeared in capital letters along with a blinding strobe light. Mr. Eichenwald, who has epilepsy, immediately suffered a seizure.
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366 links to understand fact-checking in 2016

366 links to understand fact-checking in 2016 | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
2016 was fact-checking’s finest year [1]. No it wasn’t, it was the year of “post-truth” [2] — some preferred “post-fact” [3] — and fact-checking is a fool’…
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How is technology changing finance the way we know it?

How is technology changing finance the way we know it? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Jamie Dimon of JP Morgan famously remarked to his wall street colleagues “Silicon Valley is coming to eat our lunch”. The anxiousness of disruption (by startups) at the corridor of large global banks…
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Newly Discovered Fossil Reveals Ancient Penguins Were Huge

Newly Discovered Fossil Reveals Ancient Penguins Were Huge | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The ancient penguin was the size of a small adult human, which says a lot about penguins' evolution. Learn more about the discovery at HowStuffWorks.
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Does a sweet tooth affect sugar intake?

Does a sweet tooth affect sugar intake? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It has long been known taste plays an important role in many of our food choices, but what if we knew whether having a so-called "sweet tooth" did indeed lead to a sugar habit?
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You'll Never Guess Where This FBI Agent Left a Secret Interrogation Manual | Mother Jones

You'll Never Guess Where This FBI Agent Left a Secret Interrogation Manual | Mother Jones | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
For years, the American Civil Liberties Union fought a legal battle to force the FBI to release a range of documents concerning FBI guidelines, including this one, which covers the practices agents are supposed to employ when questioning suspects. Through all this, unbeknownst to the ACLU and the FBI, the manual sat in a government archive open to the public. When the FBI finally relented and provided the ACLU a version of the interrogation guidebook last year, it was heavily redacted; entire pages were blacked out. But the version available at the Library of Congress, which a Mother Jones reporter reviewed last week, contains no redactions.

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Amazing Insects: Ants Create Chemical Cocktails to Brew Antibiotics

Amazing Insects: Ants Create Chemical Cocktails to Brew Antibiotics | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
To keep fungal pathogens at bay in their crowded homes, wood ants mix potions to create powerful protection for their nest and their young. Makes sense, right? Humans mix chemicals all the time to make medicines, household cleaners, and other health and wellness products. But wood ants (Formica paralugubris) have apparently been at it for millions of years longer than us. In a study published in Ecology and Evolution, researchers from Switzerland, at the University of Lausanne and University of Neuchâtel, discovered that wood ants not only know about the natural antibiotic properties of the
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Confabulation | Encyclopedia of Psychology

Confabulation | Encyclopedia of Psychology | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Confabulations are classified into one of two categories: provoked and spontaneous. A provoked confabulation is when a patient invents an untrue story in response to a question. These tend to be quite common among patients with amnesia or dementia. A spontaneous confabulation is a more rare occurrence and involves the telling of an untrue story with no apparent motivation.

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How the McGurk effect mixes up sights and sounds in the brain

How the McGurk effect mixes up sights and sounds in the brain | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Let's say you record a person pronouncing a couple sounds over and over again - say, "bah" and "vah", which are very similar sounds made with clearly different lip movements. Now you keep the audio of the person saying "bah" but overlay it with the video of the person saying "vah." Which sound will you hear? 


Any sane person would think you'd still hear "bah", but that isn't the case at all. The mind prioritizes the visual information over the auditory information, deciding what it sees as the correct noise - the person mouthing "vah" - trumps the ears clearly hearing the person say "bah." You can literally watch the mixed video, clearly hear the person say "vah", then close your eyes and it immediately switches back to "bah", and the only change in sounds occurred entirely in your mind. That's the McGurk effect. 


If that seems impossible to believe, check out this video demonstrating its power over our minds:

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The World's Largest 'Artificial Sun' Has Just Been Switched on in Germany

The World's Largest 'Artificial Sun' Has Just Been Switched on in Germany | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It's a bit bright in here.
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Here's Why Listening to Sad Music Makes You Feel Better

Here's Why Listening to Sad Music Makes You Feel Better | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new study sheds light on what's going on inside our brains when we match our music to our feels, and it looks like sad music can be enjoyable - rather than simply depressing - because it triggers positive memories that can help to lift our mood.

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