Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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The Synapse #1: NEUROTRANSMITTERS

The Synapse #1: NEUROTRANSMITTERS | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The synapse is a HUGE topic. Why? Because this is where everything happens. Personality, memory, mood, it’s all encoded here, in these tiny little synapses, thousands of which stud a single dendritic tree. 
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BRAIN MYTH-BUSTING: You only use 10% of your brain

BRAIN MYTH-BUSTING: You only use 10% of your brain | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
 looking at brains under microscopes, they saw neurons. They soon figured out that neurons are important for processing information, making you conscious, allowing you to move your muscles, and all the other things neurons do. But most of the cells the scientists saw weren’t neurons, and these cells didn’t seem to do anything important. They named these cells glia, which means "glue." They looked at their slides and thought, "Wow, only 10% of the cells are neurons. The other 90% of the brain is glue. People only use 10% of their brains!"
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How did gene therapy go from experimental disasters to wondrous cures?

How did gene therapy go from experimental disasters to wondrous cures? | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Scientists have solved fundamental problems that were holding back cures for rare hereditary disorders. Next we’ll see if the same approach can take on cancer, heart disease, and other common illnesses.
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A Completely new Look at DNA Replication

A Completely new Look at DNA Replication | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Scientists have gotten a close look at a process that is fundamental to life on earth - DNA replication - and were suprised by what they saw.
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Transportation as a service (TaaS): a look ahead | The Robot Report - tracking news about the business of robotics

Chris predicts an inevitable shift to EVs, a change in the ownership concept to transportation services, and dramatic changes in manufacturing and jobs in what used to be the auto industry and will soon be the transportation services industry.

Urmson attributes the shift in thought from gradually adding more self-driving features until it becomes time to remove the pedals and steering wheel - the stated posture of most of the auto industry - to using deep learning and simulation training to be able to directly go to self-driving cars - the position taken by Google, Ford, and many of the new startups - as a particularly important contribution made by Google. Later in his lecture, when answering a question about the state of the robotics industry versus the state of the art being developed in universities and research labs such as CMU, he lauded the deep pockets that business - and especially Google - brings to research in general and self-driving cars in particular.
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What's slowing the use of robots in the ag industry? | The Robot Report - tracking news about the business of robotics

Two traditional qualifyers for farmers buying new equipment are flexibility and return on investment. Precision agriculture isn't just rhetoric; it's real-time intelligence flowing into analytics software that transforms that flow into meaningful, practical information that farm managers can react to quickly. That data -- and that process -- have costs and, for the last few years, farmers have been stretched because commodity prices are down. But changes effecting labor, water, commodity prices and politics are speeding up the need for significant automation in the already heavily automated agriculture industry while technological improvements are speeding up, particularly in the areas of vision systems, perception and grasping.

Consider these four key providers:
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“Why is your research important?” – Society

“Why is your research important?” – Society | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Basic research is generally done to further scientific knowledge without obvious or immediate benefits, which is a difficult concept to explain to society.
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Cash for weight loss | Duke-NUS Medical School

“Our findings not only show the value of rewards to increase weight loss and weight loss maintenance, but they show it can be done in a manner that minimizes third party payments, such as those by employers or insurers. This should help to expand access to these types of programmes.” said senior author Dr Finkelstein, a professor in the Duke-NUS Programme for Health Services and Systems Research.

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Inside the bizarre human job of being a face for artificial intelligence

Inside the bizarre human job of being a face for artificial intelligence | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Some people are famous only among fans of a particular sport, a specific age group, or their hometown locals. Lauren Hayes, a 27-year-old model and entrepreneur, is famous at the automation software company IPsoft. At a recent conference the company hosted in New York, suited c-level executives stopped her in the hallway to tak
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The brain's amazing potential for recovery

The brain's amazing potential for recovery | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Although parts of the brain may be damaged, destroyed or even missing, remaining parts can learn how to take over the functions that were lost. This may be how someone like Giffords can recover her ability to do basic tasks such as walk, however slowly.
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40,000-year-old bracelet made by extinct human species found

40,000-year-old bracelet made by extinct human species found | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The bracelet was discovered in a site called the Denisova Cave in Siberia, close to Russia's border with China and Mongolia. It was found next to the bones of extinct animals, such as the wooly mammoth, and other artifacts dating back 125,000 years.
The cave is named after the Denisovan people — a mysterious species of hominins from the Homo genus, who are genetically different from both Homo sapiens and Neanderthals.
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The Wondrous And Completely Terrifying Future Of Food

The Wondrous And Completely Terrifying Future Of Food | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new report examines the path to sci-fi culinary ideas like implantable meals or farming on Mars.
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New species of lizard created in lab that reproduces by cloning itself

New species of lizard created in lab that reproduces by cloning itself | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Efforts such as these are, not surprisingly, more often successful than not; the problem is, the offspring are usually infertile, such as mules, or too weak to survive. The trick has been to create a new species that is able to both survive and reproduce, because otherwise, it can’t really be called a new species if it only exists for the duration of one generation.
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The Action Potential

The Action Potential | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Neurons are a lot like electrical wires. In fact, the axons areelectrical wires. As you’ve no doubt noticed, electrical wires are fast. As I type, words pass through my computer to appear on my monitor the instant my fingers press down the keys. That’s pretty darn fast.
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It’s becoming possible to know our own cells in astonishing, unparalleled detail

It’s becoming possible to know our own cells in astonishing, unparalleled detail | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The objective is to construct the first comprehensive “cell atlas,” or map of human cells, a technological marvel that should comprehensively reveal, for the first time, what human bodies are actually made of and provide scientists a sophisticated new model of biology that could speed the search for drugs.

To perform the task of cataloguing the 37.2 trillion cells of the human body, an international consortium of scientists from the U.S., U.K., Sweden, Israel, the Netherlands, and Japan is being assembled to assign each a molecular signature and also give each type a zip code in the three-dimensional space of our bodies.
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TR10: Biological Machines - MIT Technology Review

TR10: Biological Machines - MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Michel Maharbiz’s novel interfaces between machines and living systems could give rise to a new generation of cyborg devices.
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Finally! Google sells Boston Dynamics to SoftBank | The Robot Report - tracking news about the business of robotics

Finally! Google sells Boston Dynamics to SoftBank | The Robot Report - tracking news about the business of robotics | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
In a long-awaited transaction, The New York Times Dealbook announced that SoftBank was buying Boston Dynamics from Alphabet (Google). Also included in the deal is the Japanese startup Schaft. Acquisition details were not disclosed.
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New heart attack treatment uses photosynthetic bacteria to make oxygen

New heart attack treatment uses photosynthetic bacteria to make oxygen | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Bringing oxygen to starved tissues is what Stanford cardiovascular surgeon Joseph Woo had in mind when he and colleagues dreamed up the plan to put light-harvesting bacteria into the heart. In a heart attack, clogged arteries or blood clots cut off blood flow to the organ. Without oxygen supplied by the blood, heart cells die.

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