Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Watch Surgical Robot Deftly Suture a Grape

Watch Surgical Robot Deftly Suture a Grape | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
We've covered Intuitive Surgical's da Vinci surgical robot for years. In fact, to some, the system's long history—1.5 million surgeries dating back to 2000—may be one of its most surprising attributes. But this video really drives home the system's dexterity. Using a new tool, the FDA-approved Single-Site Wristed Needle Driver, a surgeon guides the bot to gently stitch the …
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The Internet Of Things Is Transforming Industries You Would Never Think Of | Digital Tonto

The Internet Of Things Is Transforming Industries You Would Never Think Of | Digital Tonto | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
As digital connectivity begins to transform physical machines, it’s likely that we’re now in the early days of a new productivity boom.
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Our Alarming Food Future, Explained in 7 Charts | Mother Jones

Our Alarming Food Future, Explained in 7 Charts | Mother Jones | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The takeaway from a blockbuster climate report: As the temperature goes up, crop yields will go down.
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3-D printers open new design space for wireless devices

3-D printers open new design space for wireless devices | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
"There are a lot of complicated 3-D metamaterial structures that people have imagined, designed and made in small numbers to prove they could work," said Steve Cummer, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke. "The challenge in transitioning to these more complicated designs has been the manufacturing process. With the ability to do this on a common 3-D printer, anyone can build and test a potential prototype in a matter of hours with relatively little cost."
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Minding the details of mind wandering

Minding the details of mind wandering | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
“Over the years, a number of different constructs have been unified under the single term ‘mind wandering,’ and through that process, the distinction between intentional and unintentional types was lost,” said Seli. “However, if intentional and unintentional types of mind wandering behave differently, and if their causes differ, then it would be exceptionally important to distinguish between the two. Without such a distinction, researchers will effectively conflate two unique cognitive experiences, and as a consequence, our understanding of mind wandering will be incomplete and perhaps even flawed.”

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, April 27, 1:51 PM
Is mind wandering good in some cases? I think it can be. It might be in those moments we explore and sow the seeds of creating. It may also point out a pedagogy need to engage each student in different ways. Learning who your students are is essential to teaching them.
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Dissociation (psychology) - Wikipedia

Dissociation (psychology) - Wikipedia

In psychology, dissociation is any of a wide array of experiences from mild detachment from immediate surroundings to more severe detachment from physical and emotional experience. The major characteristic of all dissociative phenomena involves a detachment from reality, rather than a loss of reality as in psychosis.

French philosopher and psychologist Pierre Janet (1859–1947) is considered to be the author of the concept of dissociation.[16] Contrary to some conceptions of dissociation, Janet did not believe that dissociation was a psychological defense.[17][18] Psychological defense mechanisms belong to Freud's theory of psychoanalysis, not to Janetian psychology. Janet claimed that dissociation occurred only in persons who had a constitutional weakness of mental functioning that led to hysteria when they were stressed. Although it is true that many of Janet's case histories described traumatic experiences, he never considered dissociation to be a defense against those experiences. Quite the opposite: Janet insisted that dissociation was a mental or cognitive deficit. Accordingly, he considered trauma to be one of many stressors that could worsen the already-impaired "mental efficiency" of a hysteric, thereby generating a cascade of hysterical (in today's language, "dissociative") symptoms.[16][19][20][21]

Although there was great interest in dissociation during the last two decades of the nineteenth century (especially in France and England), this interest rapidly waned with the coming of the new century.[16] Even Janet largely turned his attention to other matters. On the other hand, there was a sharp peak in interest in dissociation in America from 1890 to 1910, especially in Boston as reflected in the work of William James, Boris Sidis, Morton Prince, and William McDougall. Nevertheless, even in America, interest in dissociation rapidly succumbed to the surging academic interest in psychoanalysis and behaviorism. For most of the twentieth century, there was little interest in dissociation. Discussion of dissociation only resumed when Ernest Hilgard (1977) published his neodissociation theory in the 1970s and when several authors wrote about multiple personality in the 1980s.[citation needed]

Carl Jung described pathological manifestations of dissociation as special or extreme cases of the normal operation of the psyche. This structural dissociation, opposing tension, and hierarchy of basic attitudes and functions in normal individual consciousness is the basis of Jung's Psychological Types.[22] He theorized that dissociation is a natural necessity for consciousness to operate in one faculty unhampered by the demands of its opposite.

Attention to dissociation as a clinical feature has been growing in recent years as knowledge of post-traumatic stress disorder increased, due to interest in dissociative identity disorder and the multiple personality controversy, and as neuroimaging research and population studies show its relevance.[23]

Historically the psychopathological concept of dissociation has also another different root: the conceptualization of Eugen Bleuler that looks into dissociation related to schizophrenia.[24]
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Creativity will be the source of our next industrial revolution, not machines

Creativity will be the source of our next industrial revolution, not machines | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Growth in the first industrial revolution was driven by engineering, the second through electricity and production lines, and the third by technology and information. The modern economies that will undergo a fourth industrial revolution will not be those that worship machines, but those that support human creativity. When we understand how people think an
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New Guide Offers Dialogue and Guidance on Vicarious Trauma

New Guide Offers Dialogue and Guidance on Vicarious Trauma | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
MENU New Guide Offers Dialogue and Guidance on Vicarious Trauma Our third handbook is about the challenges posed by vicarious trauma, and provides practical tips and guidance to journalists, newsroom managers and universities. Journalism and Vicarious Trauma Guide Illustrations by Hannah Barrett Aimee Rinehart by: Aimee Rinehart Date: April 19, 2017 4 mins Recommend: 0 Log in to save this article Add to a pack Share: Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInEmail this to someone Tags: best practice, guide, vicarious trauma “Twenty years ago, we’d have maybe two edits from the Hungarian border because of the cost of doing feeds, and it would have been packaged on the ground, you’d get broadcastable packages. Now everything just comes in…that filter has disappeared.” As this agency journalist explains, the amount of graphic content journalists view every day on their computers has increased substantially. Furthermore research has shown that levels of vicarious trauma in newsroom staff is also on the rise. The sheer number of images and videos shot by eyewitnesses, but also the unfiltered nature of the content, has bought the realities of the field into the newsroom. In our third handbook, “Journalism and Vicarious Trauma: A Guide for Journalists, Editors and News Organisations,” Sam Dubberley and Michele Grant have written about the challenges posed by vicarious trauma and provide practical tips and guidance. The guide is relevant for journalists at different stages of their newsroom careers as well as decision makers in the newsroom and human resources departments. The guide will also be useful for journalism professors who need to equip future journalists with the tools to cope with the new realities of the job. Journalism and Vicarious TraumaWe define vicarious trauma in the guide as exposure to distressing images and videos that can cause similar emotional responses as when someone witnesses trauma firsthand in the field. The risk of vicarious trauma is supported by research from Eyewitness Media Hub in its report, “Making Secondary Trauma a Primary Issue: A Study of Eyewitness Media and Vicarious Trauma on the Digital Frontline,” and argues that as well as geographic frontlines, we need to think about the digital frontline.
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Laennec’s Baton: A Short History of the Stethoscope

Laennec’s Baton: A Short History of the Stethoscope | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Since its invention in 1816, the stethoscope has become one of the most iconic symbols of the medical profession. Yet there was a time when doctors had to assess the inner sounds of the human body unaided. In 350 B.C., Hippocrates—the ‘Father of Medicine’—suggested gently shaking the patient by the shoulders, while applying one’s ear directly to the chest in order to determine the presence of thoracic empyema, or pus in the lungs. For over a thousand years, medical practitioners would follow in Hippocrates’s footsteps, relying on only their ears to diagnose chest infections in patients.

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Reconstructive memory: Confabulating the past, simulating the future

Reconstructive memory: Confabulating the past, simulating the future | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The term ‘Rashomon effect’ is often used by psychologists in situations where observers give different accounts of the same event,and describes the effect of subjective perceptions on recollection. The phenomenon is named after a 1950 film by the great Japanese director Akira Kurosawa. It was with Rashōmon that Western cinema-goers discovered both Kurosawa and Japanese film in general – the film won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival in 1951, as well as the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language film the following year.

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Confabulations of Everyday Life

Confabulations of Everyday Life | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Is a memoir ever free from confabulations, if not outright lies? Can we ever give an honest account of our history without embellishing the facts? Even with the most generous and forgiving view of Frey, is there something about the nature of autobiography that makes it bound to be forged? The cognitive psychologist Ulric Neisser described memory retrieval as a kind of cognitive paleontology: much like dinosaur bones, we have bits and fragments of episodic memory that have been encoded. When we recall our past, we reconstruct these pieces into coherent narratives, filling in the blanks. And of course, these reconstructions change over time and meet the idiosyncratic, often unconscious needs of the present moment.

Sharrock's insight:
From the Great Courses Series, Steven Novella, M.D.lectures for a course on critical thinking called "Your Deceptive Mind". He introduces the term "confabulation." Although this article refers to psychopathology, it describes the less publicized neurotypical fallibility of our memories. He says that memory retrieval is better described as a constructive process, and that unlike our past beliefs in memory, we actually can "lose" memories, something hard for me to believe. Even though I have often faced complete losses of events that others remember and recount to me, I had always blamed the loss as more of a retrieval problem. But maybe the memories simply aren't there in my brain anymore. 
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40,000-year-old bracelet made by extinct human species found

40,000-year-old bracelet made by extinct human species found | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The bracelet was discovered in a site called the Denisova Cave in Siberia, close to Russia's border with China and Mongolia. It was found next to the bones of extinct animals, such as the wooly mammoth, and other artifacts dating back 125,000 years.
The cave is named after the Denisovan people — a mysterious species of hominins from the Homo genus, who are genetically different from both Homo sapiens and Neanderthals.
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The Wondrous And Completely Terrifying Future Of Food

The Wondrous And Completely Terrifying Future Of Food | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new report examines the path to sci-fi culinary ideas like implantable meals or farming on Mars.
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New species of lizard created in lab that reproduces by cloning itself

New species of lizard created in lab that reproduces by cloning itself | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Efforts such as these are, not surprisingly, more often successful than not; the problem is, the offspring are usually infertile, such as mules, or too weak to survive. The trick has been to create a new species that is able to both survive and reproduce, because otherwise, it can’t really be called a new species if it only exists for the duration of one generation.
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Grinding meat with tools let our teeth shrink, allowed brains to grow

Grinding meat with tools let our teeth shrink, allowed brains to grow | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Instead of chewing through tough raw vegetables, our ancestors began to pound meat with tools, and this change in diet led to a huge change in the way we look.

This caused our faces, teeth and jaws to shrink while our brains and bodies got larger. 

In particular, we stopped having snouts and began to look less like apes and more like modern humans - and it may even have been the key to developing language. 

The changes arose because we could get more calories from meat pounded with stone tools than from the tough vegetable roots available to early man.

The greater calorie content of meat over vegetables per gram helped provide the energy for us to roam long distances.

Meanwhile, extra room in our skulls may have allowed our brains to grow and helped us to develop language.

Our diet would have also provided more calories to power the needs of bigger brains.
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As fidget spinner craze goes global, its inventor struggles to make ends meet

As fidget spinner craze goes global, its inventor struggles to make ends meet | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Florida-based creator Catherine Hettinger couldn’t afford the patent on the ubiquitous playground toy but insists she’s ‘pleased’ about its sudden popularity
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Read This Before You Freak Out Over Gene-Edited Superbabies

Read This Before You Freak Out Over Gene-Edited Superbabies | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
This is the promise of embryonic gene editing: that our species can genetically vaccinate itself against disease, from Alzheimer’s to cystic fibrosis.
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