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Red squirrels Give Birth to Fast-Growers If They Hear Crowds

Red squirrels Give Birth to Fast-Growers If They Hear Crowds | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
As parents, we set our children up for life’s challenges by feeding them, caring for their health, and …
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Literally Nothing Will Stick To This New Slippery Surface

Literally Nothing Will Stick To This New Slippery Surface | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new generation of materials could radically reduce unwanted stickiness and solve lots of problems. The technology is called SLIPS—or Slippery Liquid-Infused Porous Surfaces.
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Quadcopter converted into balloon-hunting Laser Drone

Quadcopter converted into balloon-hunting Laser Drone | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The ability to view real-time video from a quadcopter's onboard camera is certainly a handy feature, but let's be honest – there are probably a lot of people who just think, "Wouldn't be great if I could use this to shoot at stuff?
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Marshall McLuhan's Four Innovation Fundamentals | Big Think Edge | Big Think

Marshall McLuhan's Four Innovation Fundamentals | Big Think Edge | Big Think | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
“ Marshall McLuhan, the outlandish visionary of 60s and 70s who predicted the World Wide Web, created a blueprint for innovation in the digital age. ”
Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, July 11, 2013 3:55 AM

Some interesting points to reflect on in this article.

Larchmont Films's comment, July 11, 2013 5:15 AM
He definitely foresaw Twitter with his household "the medium is the message" It's changed the way many people write.
Tracy Mehoke (梅恬溪)'s curator insight, July 22, 2013 5:35 AM

These points from the article are soothing in a way.


1. Innovation has to enhance something

 

2. Innovation needs to destroy something old

 

3. An innovation returns us to something that we feel we’ve lost

 

4. Innovation over time becomes anti-innovation

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Data Security Is Becoming the Sparkle in Bitcoin

Data Security Is Becoming the Sparkle in Bitcoin | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Underlying Bitcoin — created as a way to make payments directly, anonymously and outside government control — is the block chain, a decentralized database that is driven by cryptography.

 
Sharrock's insight:

I've read an article (that I need to find) about how block chain technology could solve issues of copyright and creative works protection. I have to find it.

 

excerpt: "Entrepreneurs worldwide are now working to harness that technology for use beyond Bitcoin transactions. The block chain, they say, could ultimately upend not only the traditional financial system but also the way people transfer and record financial assets like stocks, contracts, property titles, patents and marriage licenses — essentially anything that requires a trusted middleman for verification."

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Five Major Psychiatric Disorders Share Genetic Link

Five Major Psychiatric Disorders Share Genetic Link | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new study has found that five common psychiatric disorders - bipolar disorder, autism, ADHD, and schizophrenia - have the same genetic risk factors.

Via Dimitris Agorastos
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Phys.Org Mobile: Scientists unlock tangled mysteries of DNA

Phys.Org Mobile: Scientists unlock tangled mysteries of DNA | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It is up to a group of proteins known as chromosomal proteins to unlock the information required to trigger a function in a given cell—to form a bone, determine eye color, metabolize food, fight infections or any other function. While significant information is available about the structure and functions of chromosomal proteins, very little is known about their origin and evolution. The team of researchers is the first to explain the mechanisms responsible for the evolutionary diversification of a specific group of chromosomal proteins known as High Mobility Group Nucleosome-binding (HMG-N) proteins.
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Versal Helps Teachers Create Interactive Online Lessons, Partners With Wolfram Alpha

Versal Helps Teachers Create Interactive Online Lessons, Partners With Wolfram Alpha | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Versal is a service that allows teachers to build and publish interactive online courses, homework assignments and tutorials. The company launched its service..
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9 Cool Facts About Magnets

9 Cool Facts About Magnets | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Magnetism is light: Why do magnets stick? Magnets attract each other because they exchange photons, or the particles that make up light. But unlike the photons streaming out of a desk lamp or reflecting off of everything you see around you, these photons are virtual, and your eyes (or any particle detector) can't "see" them. They can, however, exchange momentum, and this is why they stick to things or repel them. When a kid throws a dodge ball, they're exchanging momentum with the ball, and the thrower feels a slight push back. Meanwhile the target person feels the force of the ball, and (maybe) gets knocked over — they are "repelled" from the thrower. With photons, the process can also happen in reverse, as though one kid reached out and grabbed the ball while the other was still hanging on to it, which would look like an attractive force.

Photons are the force carriers not only for magnets but also for electrostatic phenomena like static electricity, and it's why electromagnetism is the term we use for effects produced by these phenomena – including light, which is an electromagnetic wave.
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Hunger promotes acquisition of nonfood objects

Hunger promotes acquisition of nonfood objects | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Hunger motivates people to consume food, for which finding and acquiring food is a prerequisite. We test whether the acquisition component spills over to nonfood objects: Are hungry people more likely to acquire objects that cannot satisfy their hunger? Five laboratory and field studies show that hunger increases the accessibility of acquisition-related concepts and the intention to acquire not only food but also nonfood objects. Moreover, people act on this intention and acquire more nonfood objects (e.g., binder clips) when they are hungry, both when these items are freely available and when they must be paid for. However, hunger does not influence how much they like nonfood objects. We conclude that a basic biologically based motivation can affect substantively unrelated behaviors that cannot satisfy the motivation. This presumably occurs because hunger renders acquisition-related concepts and behaviors more accessible, which influences decisions in situations to which they can be applied.

Via Ashish Umre
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Ultra-cold mirrors could reveal gravity's quantum side

Ultra-cold mirrors could reveal gravity's quantum side | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

An experiment not much bigger than a tabletop, using ultra-cold metal plates, could serve up a cosmic feast. It could give us a glimpse of quantum gravity and so lead to a "theory of everything": one that unites the laws of quantum mechanics, governing the very small, and those of general relativity, concerning the monstrously huge.

 

Such theories are difficult to test in the lab because they probe such extreme scales. But quantum effects have a way of showing up unexpectedly. In a strange quantum phenomenon known as the Casimir effect, two sheets of metal held very close together in a vacuum will attract each other.

 

The effect occurs because, even in empty space, there is an electromagnetic field that fluctuates slightly all the time. Placing two metal sheets very close to one another limits the fluctuations between them, because the sheets reflect electromagnetic waves. But elsewhere the fluctuations are unrestricted, and this pushes the plates together.

James Quach at the University of Tokyo suggests that we might be able to observe the equivalent effect for gravity. That would, in turn, be direct evidence of the quantum nature of gravity: the Casimir effect depends on vacuum fluctuations, which are only predicted by quantum physics.

 

But in order to detect it, you would need something that reflects gravitational waves – the ripples in space-time predicted by general relativity. Earlier research suggested that superconductors (for example, metals cooled to close to absolute zero such that they lose all electrical resistance) might act as mirrors in this way.

 

"The quantum properties of superconductors may reflect gravitational waves. If this is correct, then the gravitational Casimir effect for superconductors should be large," says Quach. "The experiment I propose is feasible with current technology."

 

It's still unclear if superconductors actually reflect gravitational waves, however. "The exciting part of this paper has to do with a speculative idea about gravitational waves and superconductors," says Dimitra Karabali at Lehman College in New York. "But if it's right, it's wonderful."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Germ-killing molecules identified in alligator blood

Germ-killing molecules identified in alligator blood | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Thick armor and jaws packed full of teeth aren't the only defences that alligators and crocodiles have. They also have formidable immune systems and some of the protective molecules that enable this have now been identified. Their discovery in the blood of the American alligator might even pave the way for a new generation of antibiotics.

 

Crocodilians have existed on Earth for at least 37 million years. Over the course of their evolution, they have developed a very strong defence against infection. "They inflict wounds on each other from which they frequently recover without complications from infection despite the fact that the environments in which they live are less than sterile," says Barney Bishop of George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia, co-author of the new study.

 

American alligators have an enviable innate immune system, the "primitive" first line of defence that is shared by all vertebrates. In 2008, chemists in Louisiana found that blood serum taken from the reptiles destroyed 23 strains of bacteria and depleted reserves of the HIV virus. The germ-killing molecules were identified as enzymes that break down a type of lipid.

 

Although their results have yet to lead to any new antibiotics, enzymes aren't the only pathogen-busting molecules that alligators have up their sleeve. Bishop's group has now identified and isolated peptides known as a CAMPs or cationic antimicrobial peptides. These molecules are positively charged so the team developed nanoparticles to electrostatically pick them out of the complex mix of proteins in alligator blood plasma.

 

In total, the group fished out 45 peptides. Of these, they chemically synthesised eight and evaluated their antimicrobial properties. Five killed some of the E.colibacteria they were presented with, while the other three destroyed most of theE.coli and also showed some activity against bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can cause inflammation and sepsis, and Staphylococcus aureus, which can trigger skin infections, sinusitis and food poisoning. So far, the strains have performed well, says Bishop. Identifying novel antimicrobial peptides is urgently needed because of the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, says Guangshun Wang at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. "Because of the novelty of the sequences," he says, "these peptides provide new templates for developing antimicrobials to combat superbugs."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Sorting Out Emotions | Caltech

Sorting Out Emotions | Caltech | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Building on previous studies targeting the amygdala, a team of researchers has found that some brain cells recognize emotions based on the viewer's preconceptions rather than the true emotion being expressed.
Sharrock's insight:

"These are very exciting findings suggesting that the amygdala doesn't just respond to what we see out there in the world, but rather to what we imagine or believe about the world," says Ralph Adolphs, the Bren Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Caltech and coauthor of a paper that discusses the team's study.  "It's particularly interesting because the amygdala has been linked to so many psychiatric diseases, ranging from anxiety to depression to autism.  All of those diseases are about experiences happening in the minds of the patients, rather than objective facts about the world that everyone shares."


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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, March 2, 12:49 AM

emotions are the products of our mind, as much as they are of objective reality out there!

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, March 4, 3:29 AM

Another, deeper roots to our biases... on the brain-cell level... well, that might be a challenge...

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Data Mining Indian Recipes Reveals New Food Pairing Phenomenon | MIT Technology Review

Data Mining Indian Recipes Reveals New Food Pairing Phenomenon | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
By studying the network of links between Indian recipes, computer scientists have discovered that the presence of certain spices makes a meal much less likely to contain ingredients with flavors in common. In the same way that Western chefs search for unusual ingredients that share the same flavors, negative food pairing may also drive the development of new flavor combinations and recipes in Indian food. “Our study could potentially lead to methods for creating novel Indian signature recipes, healthy recipe alterations and recipe recommender systems,” conclude Jain and co.
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Scientists use immunotherapy to reduce memory problems with Alzheimer’s disease

Scientists use immunotherapy to reduce memory problems with Alzheimer’s disease | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has revealed that a single dose of an immunotherapy reverses memory problems in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease.
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Magnetic nanoparticles open blood-brain barrier for delivery of therapeutic molecules

Magnetic nanoparticles open blood-brain barrier for delivery of therapeutic molecules | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The blood-brain barrier is a highly selective semipermeable barrier running inside almost all vessels in the brain that lets through water, some gases and a few other select molecules, while preventing potentially toxic elements in the blood from...
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Has Technology Changed Us?: BBC Animations Answer the Question with the Help of Marshall McLuhan (Video)

Has Technology Changed Us?: BBC Animations Answer the Question with the Help of Marshall McLuhan (Video) | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
“BBC Radio 4 addressing the question 'How Did Everything Begin?' In February, we featured its follow-up on an equally eternal question, 'What Makes Us Human?' Both came scripted by Philosophy Bites co-creator Nigel Warburton and narrated by X-Files co-star Gillian Anderson (in full British mode).”
Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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New research finds oceanic microbes behave in synchrony across ocean basins

New research finds oceanic microbes behave in synchrony across ocean basins | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
"Surprisingly, however," said Aylward, "our work shows that these extremely different ecosystems exhibit very similar diel cycles, driven largely by sunlight and interspecies microbial interactions. This suggests that different microbial communities across the Pacific Ocean, and likely waters across the entire planet, behave in much more orderly ways than has previously been supposed."  
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Circadian Surprise: How Our Body Clocks Help Shape Our Waistlines

Circadian Surprise: How Our Body Clocks Help Shape Our Waistlines | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
scientists have made a cool discovery: We have different clocks in virtually every organ of our bodies — from our pancreas to our stomach to our fat cells.

"Yes, there are clocks in all the cells of your body," explains Fred Turek, a circadian scientist at Northwestern University. "It was a discovery that surprised many of us."
Sharrock's insight:

I've seen this in other research, especially regarding perception and cognition. Charisma, for example, is correlated with speed (frequency) and volume (amplitude) of speech/delivery and the intensity of gestures. Increasingly, research points to how we socially analyze based on timing. 

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Researchers can work out your location based on who you talk to on Twitter (TWTR)

Researchers can work out your location based on who you talk to on Twitter (TWTR) | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Researchers from Cornell University have worked out how to track Twitter users' locations — even when they have location services disabled.
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Google has developed a technology to tell whether ‘facts’ on the Internet are true

Google has developed a technology to tell whether ‘facts’ on the Internet are true | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It gives new meaning to the phrase "let me Google that for you."
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Google has developed a technology to tell whether ‘facts’ on the Internet are true

Google has developed a technology to tell whether ‘facts’ on the Internet are true | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
It gives new meaning to the phrase "let me Google that for you."
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Sound waves precisely position nanowires

Sound waves precisely position nanowires | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
"Because the pitch of both the one-dimensional and two-dimensional structures is sensitive to the frequency of the standing surface acoustic wave field, this technique allows for the patterning of nanowires with tunable spacing and density," the researchers report in a recent issue of ACS Nano. The nanowires in solution will settle in place onto the substrate when the solution evaporates, preserving the pattern. The researchers note that the patterned nanowires could then be transferred to organic polymer substrates with good accuracy by placing the polymer onto the top of the nanowires and with slight pressure, transferring the nanowires.
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Home : Statistics for Biologists

Home : Statistics for Biologists | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A collection of articles from the publisher of Nature that discusses statistical issues biologists should be aware of and provides practical advice to improve the statistical rigor of their work.
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Schizophrenia not a single disease but multiple genetically distinct disorders - PsyPost

Schizophrenia not a single disease but multiple genetically distinct disorders - PsyPost | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
New research shows that schizophrenia isn’t a single disease but a group of eight genetically distinct disorders, each with its own set of symptoms. The fi ...
Sharrock's insight:
"The investigators also replicated their findings in two additional DNA databases of people with schizophrenia, an indicator that identifying the gene variations that are working together is a valid avenue to explore for improving diagnosis and treatment." http://www.psypost.org/2014/09/schizophrenia-single-disease-multiple-genetically-distinct-disorders-28177
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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » The Great Cow Epiphany and the Six Immutable Laws of Information

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » The Great Cow Epiphany and the Six Immutable Laws of Information | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
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