Science, Technolo...
Follow
Find tag "writing"
1.1K views | +0 today
Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
Technology/Futurism/Science/Education/SystemsThinking/
Curated by Sharrock
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sharrock from Gavagai
Scoop.it!

Syntax, semantics, and naked emperors: lessons students can learn from an academic hoax

Syntax, semantics, and naked emperors: lessons students can learn from an academic hoax | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Research students at the esteemed Massachusetts Institute of Technology have devised a computer programme which automatically writes academic papers. The freely available programme, called SCIgen, has met with some success given that some of the papers it has produced have been accepted by academic journals and conferences despite them being devoid of meaning. 


Via Luca Baptista
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sharrock
Scoop.it!

How a Computer Program Helped Reveal J. K. Rowling as Author of A Cuckoo’s Calling : Scientific American

How a Computer Program Helped Reveal J. K. Rowling as Author of A Cuckoo’s Calling : Scientific American | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Author of the Harry Potter books has a distinct linguistic signature
Sharrock's insight:

Imagine the implications. I wonder if there is scholarly research into "stylometry".

from the article: "Fiction has recently become fact with the improving science of stylometry, the study of writing style."

more...
Sharrock's comment, August 23, 2013 5:59 AM
from the article: "This technology is clearly a double-edged sword. If Rowling can be identified by computational analysis, what about whistleblowers? Is anyone safe from the modern equivalent of Sherlock’s all-seeing eye? For the moment, yes. The person who truly violated Rowling’s privacy was not my computer or even the Sunday Times reporter, but the tipster who suggested the investigation in the first place. It’s simply not feasible to look at every potential author to see who might have written a book; without old-fashioned detective work (and informants), the haystack is still large enough that needles can successfully hide."