Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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Science, Technology, and Current Futurism
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How to Write Meeting Minutes: Expert Tips, Meeting Minutes Templates and Sample Meeting Minutes

How to Write Meeting Minutes: Expert Tips, Meeting Minutes Templates and Sample Meeting Minutes | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

With everything that’s at stake in today’s challenging times, it’s no wonder that employers prize accurate minute-taking skills more than ever before. Minutes serve as a permanent record of what was decided, what actions must be taken, who must take them and when.

Every day, key meetings are probably taking place in your office. And the decisions made as a result of those meetings can involve millions of dollars, and even change people’s careers. That’s why the role of the minute-taker is so important.

Business Management Daily, publisher of Administrative Professional Today, designed this special report to teach you tips and tools to take accurate, professional minutes and save time using meeting minutes templates. Whether you’ve never taken minutes before or you want to take your skills to the next level, How to WriteMeeting Minutes will help you master the task.

 
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Syntax, semantics, and naked emperors: lessons students can learn from an academic hoax

Syntax, semantics, and naked emperors: lessons students can learn from an academic hoax | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Research students at the esteemed Massachusetts Institute of Technology have devised a computer programme which automatically writes academic papers. The freely available programme, called SCIgen, has met with some success given that some of the papers it has produced have been accepted by academic journals and conferences despite them being devoid of meaning. 

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The Art of Communicating Science

The Art of Communicating Science | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A conversation with Karl Bates,director of research communications at Duke
Sharrock's insight:

Insight treasure trove in one paragraph here…Mind blown!

 

This is a powerful insight in the article and it needs to be shared:

 

“So, in offensively broad terms, I’d say the scientist is fairly obsessive about precision, and wants to at least identify – if not absolutely control – all variables.  They strive to be comprehensive and worry about what they’ve left out.  I think some of them live in mortal fear of being seen as superficial, especially among their colleagues, so more information is almost always a better thing.  Their vocabulary is off-putting to the uninitiated, but it can be super-precise, just the way they like it.  And after many years, I started to recognize this huge difference in cognitive style between scientists and the rest of us: they are really comfortable spreading out and labeling all of the pieces of the puzzle before they get down to figuring out what it might represent.  Most folks like to study the box to know what the picture is first!”

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How a Computer Program Helped Reveal J. K. Rowling as Author of A Cuckoo’s Calling : Scientific American

How a Computer Program Helped Reveal J. K. Rowling as Author of A Cuckoo’s Calling : Scientific American | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Author of the Harry Potter books has a distinct linguistic signature
Sharrock's insight:

Imagine the implications. I wonder if there is scholarly research into "stylometry".

from the article: "Fiction has recently become fact with the improving science of stylometry, the study of writing style."

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Sharrock's comment, August 23, 2013 8:59 AM
from the article: "This technology is clearly a double-edged sword. If Rowling can be identified by computational analysis, what about whistleblowers? Is anyone safe from the modern equivalent of Sherlock’s all-seeing eye? For the moment, yes. The person who truly violated Rowling’s privacy was not my computer or even the Sunday Times reporter, but the tipster who suggested the investigation in the first place. It’s simply not feasible to look at every potential author to see who might have written a book; without old-fashioned detective work (and informants), the haystack is still large enough that needles can successfully hide."