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For Sale: “Your Name Here” in a Prestigious Science Journal

For Sale: “Your Name Here” in a Prestigious Science Journal | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
An investigation into some scientific papers finds worrying irregularities
-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How 'Google Science' could transform academic publishing

How 'Google Science' could transform academic publishing | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Google is allegedly working on a free, open access platform for the research, collaboration and publishing of peer-reviewed scientific journals

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Collaborative learning for robots | KurzweilAI

Collaborative learning for robots | KurzweilAI | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Researchers from MIT’s Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems have developed an algorithm in which distributed agents — such as robots exploring a building — collect data and analyze it independently. Pairs of agents, such as robots passing each other in the hall, then exchange analyses.

In experiments involving several different data sets, the researchers’ distributed algorithm actually outperformed a standard algorithm that works on data aggregated at a single location, as described in an arXiv paper.

 


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Different Facets of Memory - BrainFacts.org

Different Facets of Memory - BrainFacts.org | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
From remembering a friend's face to figuring out where you left your keys, the act of memory has many dimensions.
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There are different kinds of memory: "Different areas and systems of the brain are responsible for different kinds of memory. The hippocampus, parahippocampal region, and areas of the cerebral cortex (including the prefrontal cortex) work together to support declarative, or cognitive, memory. Different forms of nondeclarative, or behavioral, memory are supported by the amygdala, striatum, and cerebellum." 

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Stop asking if Piketty was right or wrong; not everyone will ever agree anyway

Stop asking if Piketty was right or wrong; not everyone will ever agree anyway | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

 Computer bugs and Excel mishaps are inevitable because code is written by humans and even brilliant economists aren’t perfect. But careful researchers catch important mistakes; they debug their work until the remaining bugs don’t change the result very much when they are fixed. In both the Piketty and Reinhart and Rogoff cases, it seems the bugs exposed didn’t change their original results. This explains why, while most people assume a bug is a sign of unforgivable sloppiness, economists shrug, point out the results didn’t change much, and think that’s an adequate defense. The economists are right; the existence of a bug isn’t necessarily a big deal.

Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: "At the end one of three things happen: the field comes to a consensus about whether the incumbent is right and the original research was wrong or scholars may decide original research was once right but things have changed. Or the most likely outcome: there’s no agreement and competing schools of thought form around personal judgment on whose assumptions are worse. It’s not pretty; but data is imperfect, subject to interpretation and the economy constantly evolves. That’s the best researchers (in any field) can do. If you look hard enough, at any study, you can always find something you disagree with and assumptions that didn’t prove correct, even in hard sciences. For good or bad, Piketty wrote the right book at the right time, which meant undue praise and unfair criticism."

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Neuron Light Switch Now Goes “On” and “Off” | MIT Technology Review

Neuron Light Switch Now Goes “On” and “Off” | MIT Technology Review | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A new optogenetic protein gives neuroscientists more control over brain circuits.

 

Optogenetics is a recent innovation in neuroscience that gives researchers the ability to control the activity of neurons with light. With this powerful tool, researchers are teasing apart the biological basis of memory, behavior, and disease (see “Scientists Make Mice ‘Remember’ Things That Didn’t Happen” and “An On-Off Switch for Anxiety,”). But for the first several years of this technology’s existence, the proteins that scientists added to neurons to make them react to light were only good at activating neurons. That limited researchers’ ability to understand neuronal circuits, sets of interconnected neurons that are thought to control behavior and, when misfiring, to underlie many brain conditions. Problems can arise from any imbalance in circuit activity, whether too much or too little. 


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33rd Square: Prototype Holographic Memory Device Created

33rd Square: Prototype Holographic Memory Device Created | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Researchers have demonstrated a holographic memory device that could improve storage capacity and processing capabilities in electronics.
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Big Data Brain Drain | Science Careers

Big Data Brain Drain | Science Careers | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

excerpt: ""Where scientific research is concerned, this recently accelerated shift to data-centric science has a dark side, which boils down to this: the skills required to be a successful scientific researcher are increasingly indistinguishable from the skills required to be successful in industry," VanderPlas writes. "While academia, with typical inertia, gradually shifts to accommodate this, the rest of the world has already begun to embrace and reward these skills to a much greater degree. The unfortunate result is that some of the most promising upcoming researchers are finding no place for themselves in the academic community, while the for-profit world of industry stands by with deep pockets and open arms." (Note that the emphasis is in the original.)"

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MIT's ConceptNet Helps Advance Artificial Intelligence - Design News

MIT's ConceptNet Helps Advance Artificial Intelligence - Design News | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
MIT's ConceptNet Helps Advance Artificial Intelligence
Design News
Artificial intelligence (AI) is the fodder of science fiction past, but reality may be creeping up. It is a big subject of research in today's universities and corporations.
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IBM launches research lab for big data applications

IBM launches research lab for big data applications | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
IBMIBM Accelerated Discovery Lab Dec. 4 - 5, 2013 Redwood City, CA Early Bird Tickets on Sale The world has a lot of Big Data, or massive amounts of information stored across giant data centers.
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33rd Square: Researchers Develop Multi-Touch Sensor That Can Be Cut

33rd Square: Researchers Develop Multi-Touch Sensor That Can Be Cut | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Researchers at the MIT Media Lab and the Max Planck Institutes have created a foldable, cuttable multi-touch sensor that works even when you cut it, allowing multi-touch input in a wide variety of configurations.
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Cancer therapies likely to improve with new insights into DNA repair process


Via Heather Swift
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Heather Swift's curator insight, October 3, 2013 10:10 PM

Cancer therapies likely to improve with new insights into DNA repair process
By detailing a process required for repairing DNA breakage, scientists at the Duke Cancer Institute have gained a better understanding of how cells deal with the barrage of damage that can contribute to cancer and other diseases.

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These Two Guys Studied Their Feces for a Year

These Two Guys Studied Their Feces for a Year | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
In 2009, Eric Alm, a professor of biological engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, hadn’t had a bowel movement at home for almost the entire year. Neither did Lawrence David, Alm’s graduate student at the time.
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Secrets of the Creative Brain

Secrets of the Creative Brain | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
A leading neuroscientist who has spent decades studying creativity shares her research on where genius comes from, whether it is dependent on high IQ—and why it is so often accompanied by mental illness. 
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In a superconductor, everything happens at once | Cornell Chronicle

In a superconductor, everything happens at once | Cornell Chronicle | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Scientists are closing in on the secret recipe for high-temperature superconductors. The secret ingredients are still unknown, but new research at Cornell and Brookhaven National Laboratory has revealed a little more about how they are mixed. Three previously observed events associated with the emergence of superconductivity turn out to occur at the same time.

 
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Here's How a Chimp Is Smarter Than You

Here's How a Chimp Is Smarter Than You | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Chimps recently figured out a computer game more quickly than humans. It may be because they're so familiar with navigating basic win-lose dynamics.
Sharrock's insight:

excerpt: “The hypothesis is that win or lose-type games are seminal things that happen in a chimp’s life,” Camerer says, referring to “hide and seek” situations with predators, gambits designed to seek domination within a group, and incursion by rival groups to maximize territory. “They have a lot of experience, we think, with these win-lose situations.”

  

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Syntax, semantics, and naked emperors: lessons students can learn from an academic hoax

Syntax, semantics, and naked emperors: lessons students can learn from an academic hoax | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it

Research students at the esteemed Massachusetts Institute of Technology have devised a computer programme which automatically writes academic papers. The freely available programme, called SCIgen, has met with some success given that some of the papers it has produced have been accepted by academic journals and conferences despite them being devoid of meaning. 


Via Luca Baptista
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The Power of Cursing When Practicing Affirmations

Why do people use cursing in their everyday language? Many people may see it as a sign of immaturity, but a recent study shows that cursing can help relieve pain and stress.
Sharrock's insight:

This is effing awesome! A new reason for people to say whatever the eff they want to! (In private anyway...)

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33rd Square: Supercomputer Used To Decode the Way Cells Perceive Light

33rd Square: Supercomputer Used To Decode the Way Cells Perceive Light | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Researchers have found that the melanopsin pigment in the eye is potentially more sensitive to light than its more famous counterpart, rhodopsin, the pigment that allows for night vision.
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Tech Talk: 5G- Ericsson

Tech Talk: 5G- Ericsson | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
In this Tech Talk, Erik Dahlman, Senior Expert in Radio Access Technologies within Ericsson Research talks about 5G or fifth-generation radio access, what it is and what we believe it will bring us.
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What's In That Chicken Nugget? Maybe You Don't Want To Know

What's In That Chicken Nugget? Maybe You Don't Want To Know | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
An "autopsy" of nuggets from two national fast-food chains finds they're 50 percent meat – at best.
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33rd Square: The Human Brain Project Has Begun Building the Super Brain

33rd Square: The Human Brain Project Has Begun Building the Super Brain | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
The multi-billion Euro Human Brain Project, co-funded by the European Union, plans to use supercomputers to model the human brain and then use the research to simulate drugs and treatments for diseases, create learning artificial intelligence and...
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Belinda Suvaal's curator insight, October 17, 2013 11:55 AM

Het menselijk brein: 10^12 neuronen (processoren) die door 10^15 verbindingen parallel met elkaar kunnen communiceren....lastige klus dus. 

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What Adults Need to Know about Pediatric Depression | MIND Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

What Adults Need to Know about Pediatric Depression | MIND Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Science, Technology, and Current Futurism | Scoop.it
Research shows that children, even babies, experience depression1. The clinical term is called Pediatric Depression, and rates are higher now than ever before2. In the United ...
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Medical Xpress: Massive DNA study points to new heart drug targets and a key role for triglycerides

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